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Undergraduate Catalog 



ooH-iooii 




TOWSON 



UNIVERSITY 



Towson University 
Academic Calendar 



Information about course offerings and registration is found online, http://students. towson. edu 



Fall Term 2005 

Classes begin August 29 iMi 

Change of Schedule period begins August 19 (M) 

Labor Day — No classes September 5 (M) 

Change of Schedule period ends. Last day to 

drop a course with no grade posted to 

academic record. Last day to add a course. . . .September 7 (W) 

Last day to withdraw from first 7-week 

courses with a grade of W September 26 (M) 

.Mid-term and end of first ^-week courses . . . .October 14 (F) 

Second 7-week courses begin October 17 (M) 

Last day to withdraw from full term courses 

with a grade of W. Last day to change 

to or from Pass or Audit grading options November 9 (W) 

Last day to withdraw from second T'-week 

courses with a grade of \X' November 14 (Ml 

Thanksgivmg Holiday — No classes November 23-25 (W-F) 

Classes resume November 28 (M) 

Last day of classes (Last Saturday classes 

meet December 3.*) December 9 (F) 

Final examinations begin" December 10 (S) 

Last day of examinations and end of term December 16 (F) 

(December 17 will be used in the event of 
inclement weather.) 

Commencement January 8 (SU| 



^Saturday exams will be held at the regularly scheduled meeting time on 
December 10. 



Minimester 2006 

.Minimester begins January 3 (T) 

.\Imimester Change of Schedule period January 3-4 (T-W) 

Last day to withdraw from 

Minimester courses January 1 1 (W) 

.Martin Luther King Day — No classes January 16 (M) 

Minimester ends January 25 (W) 

Spring Term 2006 

Spring classes begm January 30 (M) 

Change of Schedule period begins January 30 (.M) 

Change of Schedule period ends. 

Last day to drop a course with no grade 

posted to academic record. Last day to 

add a course February 7 (T) 

Last day to withdraw from 

first 7-week courses with a grade of W February 2~ (Ml 

Spring Break - No classes March 19-26 (SU-SU) 

(Saturday. .March 18 classes will meet but 
Saturday, .March 25 classes will not meet.) 

Classes resume March 27 (.M) 

Mid-term and end of first 7-week courses . . . ..March 27 (M) 

Second 7-week courses begin March 28 (T) 

Last day to withdraw from full term courses 

with a grade of W. Last day to change to or from 

Pass or .\udit grading options .^pril 10 (M) 

Last day to withdraw from second 7-week 

courses .April 1 8 (T) 

Last day of classes 

(Last Saturday classes meet .May 13.) -May 16 (T) 

Final examinations begin .May 1 ^ (W) 

Last day of examinations and end of term . . . ..May 23 (T) 

Commencement TB,-\ 



The purpose of this catalog is to provide information about the university and existing resources and services and current curriculum 
programs, rules, regulations and policies. Catalog information is thus to be used as an informational guide and practical resource. 
The university, however, in its discretion and from time to time, may amend the information contained in this catalog by modifica- 
tion, deletions or additions to it. Accordingly, the catalog and information it contains do not constitute a contract. 

EMERGENCY CLOSING POLICY 

Announcements about schedule changes or cancellations will be broadcast over the following major radio and TV stations: WBAL 
(AM/1090), WCAO (AM/600). WMZQ (FM/9S.7). WLIF (FM/IOl .9). W'TOP lFM/107.7). \X'BAL-TV (I I). WJZ-TV (13), 
WMAR-TV (2) and WRC-TV (4). Information will also be available by calling 410-704-NEWS or 410-704-2000. 



Table of Contents 



TOWSON UNIVERSITY 

Letter from the President ii 

The University 1 

University Curricukim 4 

Academic Regulations 22 

Undergraduate Planning Guide 28 

Undergraduate Admissions 30 

International Undergraduate Admissions 36 

Student Life and Campus Services 37 

Academic Resources 45 

Housing and Residence Life 49 

Expenses 50 

Financial Aid 55 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 59 

Accounting, Department of 62 

Business Administration Program 65 

Economics, Department of 68 

Finance, Department of 71 

Management, Department of 72 

Marketing and e-Business, Department of 75 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 79 

Early Childhood Education, Department of 82 

Elementary Education, Department of 85 

Reading, Special Education and Instructional Technology, Department of 87 

Secondary Education, Department of 93 

COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS AND COMMUNICATION 95 

Art, Department of 96 

Dance, Department of 102 

Electronic Media and Film, Department of 105 

Mass Communication and Communication Studies, Department of 108 

Music, Department of 114 

Theatre Arts, Department of 119 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 122 

Allied Health Program 123 

Audiology, Speech-Language Pathology and Deaf Studies, Department of 124 

Health Science, Department of 127 

Kinesiology, Department of 131 

Nursing, Department of 136 

Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science, Department of 138 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 142 

Cultural Studies Program 143 

English, Department of 144 

Environmental Science and Studies Program 147 

Family Studies and Human Services, Department of 149 

Geography and Environmental Planning, Department of 152 

History, Department of 156 

Interdisciplinary Studies Program 158 

International Studies Program 168 

Law and American Civilization Program 173 

Metropolitan Studies Program 175 

Modern Languages, Department of 176 

Philosophy and Religious Studies, Department of 178 

Political Science, Department of 182 

Psychology, Department of 184 

Social Sciences Program 187 

Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice, Department of 188 

Women's Studies, Department of 193 

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 195 

Center for Science and Mathematics Education 196 

Interdisciplinary Studies 196 

Biological Sciences, Department of 197 

Chemistry, Department of 202 

Computer and Information Sciences, Department of 205 

Environmental Science and Studies Program 211 

Mathematics, Department of 213 

Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Bioinformatics Program 217 

Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences, Department of 218 

Dual Degree Programs 223 

Pre-Professional Programs 228 

COLLEGE OF GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH 231 

DIVISION OF ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY OUTREACH 233 

BOARDS, OFFICERS AND FACULTY 236 

APPENDICES 

A. Mission Statement/University Goals 258 

B. Maryland Higher Education Commission 260 

C. Residency Policy 264 

D. Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 266 

E. Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy 267 

F. Code of Conduct 267 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 279 

INDEX 345 

CAMPUS DIRECTORY 349 



Dear Student: 

Welcome to another year of learning and discovery, both in the classroom and 
beyond. Whether it is your first or last term at Towson University, I urge you to 
embrace the many opportunities on and off campus for intellectual and personal 
development. 

Your college years are a time to explore the many different ways of learning that 
can shape and enrich your life and career. Towson University faculty and staff are 
here to help every student who joins the university community expand their 
choices. 

During your time here, seize every opportunity to learn and to grow. Talk with 
your professors outside the classroom; engage in conversations with people of 
different backgrounds; attend arts performances, athletic events, and lectures by 
visiting scholars; and become active in at least one student organization. Retain a 
sharp focus on your academic subjects, but also remember that an important part 
of education and learning occurs beyond the classroom and computer screen. You 
should become part of the broader communities both on- and off-campus. 

I once saw this quote in a classroom: "Grasp even one small idea for the first 
time, and you have found a whole new world." Keep this in mind as you 
navigate your way through your college years. Make the most of what we have 
to offer at Towson University and you will be able to offer your best to the world. 



Sincerely, 

Robert L. Caret 
President 



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The University 



Towson University. Maryland's Metropolitan University, is nationally recognized for 
its excellent programs in the arts and sciences, communications, business, health profes- 
sions, education, fine arts and computer science. The universir\' is located in ihe suburban 
community- of Towson. Man land, just eight miles north of downtown Baltimore. 

Its beautifully landscaped 328-acre setting provides a pleasant environment for study 
and a diverse campus life, as well as easy access to a wealth of university and community 
resources. Towson University enrolls and graduates more undergraduate students from the 
region than any other institution. 



The University 



HISTORY 

The institution known today as Tovvson Universit)' opened its 
doors in 1866 in downtown Baltimore as the Maryland State 
Normal School — the only institution devoted exclusively to the 
preparation of teachers for the public schools of Maryland. The 
first class consisted of 1 1 students. 

In 1915 the school moved to Towson. By 1935, it established the 
Bachelor of Science degree in education and changed its name to 
Mar\'land State Teachers College at Towson. In 1946 it introduced 
an arts and sciences program, and in 1 963 the institution expanded 
its offerings in the arts and sciences and became Towson State 
College. 

Towson was granted universit)' status on July 1, 1976, in recog- 
nition of its development into a comprehensive university. In 1988 
Towson State Universit)' joined the Universit)' System of Maryland. 
On July 1, 1997, Towson State Universit)' became Towson University, 
a change that reflects its evolution from a state-supported to a state- 
assisted institution. As of May 2004, the universit)' has graduated 
100,692 students, 13,223 of them having received advanced 
degrees. 

Enrollment for the 2004 fall term was 12,405 full-time under- 
graduates, 1,906 part-time undergraduates, and 3,356 graduate 
students. 

PHILOSOPHY OF LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION 
AT TOWSON UNIVERSITY 

Excellence at Towson Universit)' begins with its commitment to a 
sound liberal arts education for every student. All students explore 
the historical development and interrelationships among the four 
central areas of knowledge (fine arts, humanities, science and math- 
ematics, and social and behavioral sciences), and how each of them 
addresses the world, investigates, reaches conclusions, and presents 
findings — extending the reaches of human knowledge. The univer- 
sit)' helps all students develop a range of intellectual skills that will 
continue to enrich and shape their lives long after their formal edu- 
cation has ended. 

COLLEGES 

Students choose their programs of study from the university's aca- 
demic colleges: the College of Business and Economics, the College 
of Education, the College of Fine Arts and Communication, the 
College of Health Professions, the College of Liberal Arts, and the 
College of Science and Mathematics. All undergraduate programs 
within each college are fully described in the Undergraduate 
Catalog. For information on the College of Graduate Studies and 
Research, see the description in this catalog. 

FACULTY 

Towson University offers many opportunities for close student-fac- 
ulty contact and promotes a supportive environment that encour- 
ages exploration and personal growth. A student-faculty ratio of 
approximately 18:1 allows students to interact frequently with 
their professors. More than 85 percent of the 525 full-time perma- 
nent faculty have earned the highest degree of academic prepara- 
tion in their fields from some of the finest colleges and universities 
in the world. Many facult)' are recognized nationally and interna- 
tionally for their published works and honors. Small classes and the 
tradition that all instructors — including most full professors — teach 
introductory courses helps to enhance the strength of Towson 's fac- 
ult)' — their dedication to excellent teaching. 



GOVERNANCE 

Towson Universit)' is a member of the University System of 
Maryland (USM), which comprises 11 campuses, about 70 centers 
and institutes and three research and public service institutes. 

A Board of Regents, consisting of 17 regents appointed by the 
governor, has oversight over the USM campuses and institutes. 

The president and his or her designees are responsible for the 
day-to-day go\ernance of the universit)'. The Universit)" Senate and 
its committees develop universit)' policies and procedures, with the 
senate also serving in an advisory capacity to the university presi- 
dent. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

The Student Government Association (SGA) is the student govern- 
mental body authorized by the administration of the universit)'. 
The SGA consists of an executive branch, composed of a president, 
vice president, attorney general, and treasurer, and a legislative 
body called the Senate, composed of 18 students elected at large 
and two students appointed from the freshman class. The SGA 
Senate and its committees develop policies and procedures affecting 
students and student-run organizations. 

ACCREDITATION/AFFILLATION 

The Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, the 
Maryland State Department of Education, The National Council 
for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the National 
Association of Schools of Music, the National Association of 
Schools of Dance, the National Association of Schools of Theatre, 
the Maryland State Board of Nursing, the National League for 
Nursing, the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy 
Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy 
Association (AOTA), Council on Academic Accreditation of the 
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, AACSB 
International — The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of 
Business for both business and accounting programs, the American 
Chemical Society, the American Association for Health 
Education/National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 
Education (AAHE/NCATE), the Commission on Accreditation of 
Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), the Association of 
University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA), and the 
Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET. 

The universit)' is a member of the American Council on 
Education, the American Association of State Colleges and 
Universities, and the Association of American Colleges. 

ASSESSMENT 

Assessment is the ongoing process of establishing clear, measurable 
expected outcomes of student learning; systematically gathering, 
analyzing and interpreting evidence to determine how well student 
performance matches those expectations, and using the resulting 
information to understand and improve student learning through- 
out Towson University. .\ll Towson Universit)' activities that aim to 
deepen student learning — undergraduate and graduate courses and 
programs, co-curricular activities, student life programs, and the 
General Education curriculum — systematically assess learning out- 
comes. Because assessment is an integral part of the teaching- 
learning process, Towson students participate in a variety of assess- 
ments as part of their education experience. 

The University Assessment Council works closely with the 
Associate Vice President for Assessment and Institutional Research 
to oversee Towson Universit)' s assessment efforts. For more infor- 
mation on Towson's assessment program, contact the Associate 
Vice President for Assessment and Institutional Research, 
410-704-2620. Information is also available online at 
www.towson.edu/assessment. 



The University 



PRIVACY RIGHTS OF STUDENTS 

Towson University is in compliance with the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (aka Buckley 
Amendment). As such, it is the policy of the university (1) to per- 
mit students to inspect their academic records; (2) to limit disclo- 
sure to others of personally identifiable information from educa- 
tion records without students' prior written consent; and (3) to 
provide students the opportunity to seek correction of their educa- 
tion records where appropriate. 

A more complete description of the policy and the records con- 
sidered confidential may be found in Appendix D. 

NON-DISCRIMINATION IN EDUCATION AND 
EMPLOYMENT 

Towson University's policies, programs and activities comply with 
federal and state laws and regulations prohibiting discrimination 
on the basis of race, color, religion, age, national origin, sex, dis- 
ability and sexual orientation. For further information, contact the 
Towson University Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity, 
410-704-2360, http://www.towson.edu/aa. 



NOTICE OF THE ANNUAL CLERY CAMPUS 
SECURITY REPORT 

In accordance with the guidelines established by Towson 
University, and pursuant to federal law, identified as the "Jeanne 
Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime 
Statistics Act of 1998," all currently enrolled students, campus 
employees and all prospective students and prospective employees 
are entitled to request and receive a copy of the Towson University 
Annual Campus Security Report known as the Clery Report. The 
report contains crime statistics about certain specified crimes/inci- 
dents that have been reported to the Towson University Police 
Department and/or campus security authorities over the past three 
years and which have occurred either on-campus, in off-campus 
buildings or property owned or controlled by the university, or on 
public property adjacent to campus. The report also contains poli- 
cies and practices pertaining to campus security, crime reporting, 
alcohol and drugs, victims' assistance programs, student discipline, 
campus resources, community safety alerts, crime prevention, 
access to campus facilities/properties as well as personal safety tips. 
The report encourages the reporting of all crime occurrences. The 
report describes how and to whom to report crimes. 

Copies of this report may be obtained from the Towson 
University Police by visiting the department in person, calling 
410-704-2505, or by requesting the report online at 
www.towson.edu/police. 





University Curriculum 



University Curriculum 



CURRICULUM 

Towson University takes pride in the breadth and depth of its 
undergraduate academic programs. Students acquire a broad back- 
ground in the Hberai arts and sciences based on the General 
Education (GenEd) requirements, upon which they build concen- 
trated study in one subject, their major field of study. They may 
select courses ranging from the traditional to the contemporary. 
This undergraduate foundation prepares them to take their place in 
the professional world or in graduate studies. 

The university's six undergraduate colleges — the College of 
Business and Economics, the College of Education, the College of 
Fine Arts and Communication, the College of Health Professions, 
the College of Liberal Arts, and the College of Science and 
Mathematics — offer more than 60 undergraduate majors leading 
to the baccalaureate degree. The university also offers specialized 
programs, including minors, concentrations, tracks, and double 
majors. 

DESIGNING YOUR COURSE OF STUDY 

Although many students enter the university fully aware of their 
academic and occupational goals, others have yet to select a field 
or program of specialization. Frequently, students change their 
majors several times over the course of their college careers. 
Students may explore the range of programs that interest them in 
several ways: 

• consulting with an adviser at the Academic Advising 
Center, Lecture Hall, 410-704-2472 

• meeting with their assigned faculty adviser or with a faculty 
member whose field of study interests them 

• exploring career opportunities and vocational interests through 
the Counseling Center, Glen Esk, 410-704-2512 

• investigating career opportunities at the Career Center, 
410-704-2233 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 
Student Responsibility 

Students are expected to familiarize themselves with the 
Undergraduate Catalog and to satisfy all published degree require- 
ments. Failure to do so does not provide a basis for exceptions to 
academic requirements or policies. It is expected that students will 
receive assistance from general academic and faculty advisers, but 
students must assume responsibility for completing published 
degree requirements. 

Students are also expected to be familiar with regulations per- 
taining to campus life and deportment, and to conduct themselves 
in a way that reflects well upon themselves and Towson University. 

Finally, students are expected to maintain communication with 
the university and to assure that their current addresses and tele- 
phone numbers are on file in the Office of the Registrar. 

Changes in Terminology 

Students use Towson Online Services to register for classes and 
track their academic progress. Please note that some academic 
terms used online and in the catalog are interchangeable. For exam- 
ple: majors and minors are referred to as Academic Plans; concen- 
trations and tracks are referred to as Academic Sub-Plans. 



Bachelor of Science 

Students must fulfill the following requirements to graduate with a 
Bachelor of Science degree: 

1. Completion of the online graduation application 
(http://onestop.towson.edu) according to the following dead- 
lines: 

• June graduates file by September 30 of the year prior to 
graduation. 

• August graduates file by March 30 of the year of gradua- 
tion. 

• December graduates file by May 30 of the year of gradua- 
tion. 

2. At least 120 earned units 

3. A minimum of 43 units of General Education (GenEd) require- 
ments (see below). 

4. At least 32 units (part of the 120 total units required) of upper- 
level work (courses numbered 300+ and 400+); courses taken 
at two-year institutions cannot count as part of the 32 upper- 
level units required. Courses from four-year institutions will 
transfer at the numerical level as they were taken at the trans- 
fer institution and may not be converted to an equivalent TU 
number or level. 

5. Completion of Writing for a Liberal Education (ENGL 102) or 
its equivalent with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher 

6. Completion of a major (a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher 
must be earned in all courses applied toward the major and, if 
applicable, minor) 

7. A cumulative GPA of at least 2.00 

8. Completion of at least 15 units after formal matriculation as a 
degree candidate 

9. Completion of at least 30 units in residence at Towson unless 
permission is granted in advance by the Academic Standards 
Committee to earn the units at another institution 

The undergraduate records of all persons receiving a bachelor's 
degree are CLOSED 180 days following graduation. Any changes 
to the permanent record MUST be made within this period of time. 

Bachelor of Arts 

The requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree mirror those for 
the Bachelor of Science degree, but Bachelor of Arts candidates 
must also complete a foreign language through the intermediate 
(200) level (or the equivalent). See the Department of Modern 
Languages section in this catalog. 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree is available only to students who 
complete the major in Dance. The requirements for th^ Bachelor 
of Fine Arts degree are identical to those for a Bachelor of Science 
degree, but Bachelor of Fine Arts candidates must also fulfill the 
performance and studio requirements specified by the Department 
of Dance. 

Bachelor of Music 

The Bachelor of Music degree is available only to students who 
complete the major in Music. The requirements for the Bachelor of 
Music degree are identical to those for a Bachelor of Science degree, 
but Bachelor of Music candidates must also fulfill the performance 
and studio requirements specified by the Department of Music. 

Bachelor of Technical and Professional Studies 

The Bachelor of Technical and Professional Studies (BTPS) is avail- 
able only to students in specifically articulated programs between 
Towson University and area community colleges. For example, the 
Chemical Dependency Counseling and Education major within the 
Health Science curriculum is a BTPS program. 



University Curriculum 



Concurrent Degrees 

Students simultaneously pursuing course work in two programs of 
study may wish to earn rwo degrees concurrently and receive two 
diplomas. In such cases, the Academic Standards Committee will 
consider requests from students wishing to receive two degrees pro- 
vided they; 

1. Complete a minimum of 150 units. 

2. Complete both programs of study. 

3. Complete a minimum of 60 units in residence at Towson 
University. 

4. Complete at least half of the units required in each major in 
residence at Towson University. 

5. Have no more than 12 units overlap between each major, 
including program core and program electives. 

6. Complete an appropriate advanced writing course for each of 
the majors, where required. 

7. Submit a letter of request to the Secretary of the Academic 
Standards Committee, with a copy to each department chair- 
person, fuUv explaining how he or she will satisf)' the require- 
ments for the concurrent degrees. This request must be made 
at least one vear before the expected date of graduation. 

CATALOG SELECTION 

Students must fulfill all degree requirements from a single catalog. 
They will be assigned the catalog in effect at the time of their for- 
mal admission to Towson Universit)- and will have 10 years to com- 
plete the requirements of that catalog in order to graduate. 

Students may request an alternate catalog under the following 
conditions: 

l.They may select the catalog in effect at the time of formal 
admission at their initial transferring institution, provided 10 years 
have not elapsed. Students may elect this option by completing the 
Catalog Selection Petition and submitting the form to the Academic 
Standards Committee for final approval. 

2. They may select a later catalog than the one assigned to them 
at the time of formal admission to Towson provided that the cho- 
sen catalog has not expired. The student will be required to com- 
plete the general degree requirements in effect for the selected cat- 
alog yean This will not alter the original transfer package/option 
received at the time of formal admission to Towson University. 
Students may elect this option with the signed approval of their 
major department chairperson on the Catalog Selection Petition. 
This form must be submitted to the Academic Standards 
Committee for final approval. 

These forms are available in the Registrar's Customer Service 
Center, Enrollment Services, room 223. Students must see an aca- 
demic adviser before submitting this form in order to determine the 
impact their catalog selection may have on their degree require- 
ments. Please note that any change in catalog may affect degree 
requirements and may negate previous advising. 



CATALOG EXTENSION 

The Academic Standards Committee authorizes the Office of the 
Registrar to grant a one-year extension to degree candidates who 
have been unable to meet the major or general degree requirements 
in effect at the time of their formal admission to Towson University. 
Students should use the Catalog Selection Petition to request an 
extension. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Higher education serves a higher purpose than simply providing 
basic occupational training. The General Education requirements 
are designed to help students gain essential intellectual skills and 
knowledge that will be important throughout their lives. 

These skills include successful speaking and writing, the gather- 
ing and evaluation of information, the appreciation of diverse 
points of view, and the ability to understand and formulate ideas 
and values. These skills will provide students with: 1) the flexibili- 
ty and resourcefulness required to adapt successfully to rapid 
social, economic and technological change, 2) the understanding 
and tolerance necessary for informed citizenship and social action, 
and 3) the interest and curiosity essential to the pursuit of learning 
throughout the whole of life. 

The requirements are grouped in two basic categories: I. Skills 
for Liberal Learning, and 11. Contexts for Liberal Learning. 
Category 1 emphasizes useful tools for gathering, evaluating, valu- 
ing and shaping information and ideas. Category II identifies social, 
historical, cultural and scientific contexts wherein knowledge finds 
active meaning, and emphasizes the need for understanding inter- 
disciplinary relationships among the different ways of knowing. 




University Curriculum 



I. Skills for Liberal Learning 



Category LA. Writing for a Liberal Education 

These courses explore ways of writing and thinking in the 
branches of knowledge and of developing rhetorical strategies 
for successful college-let'el expository writing. 

One course is required in this category. A grade equivalent 
of 2.00 or higher is required to fulfill the requirement. A grade 
of PS is acceptable provided the course is not required for the 
major or minor. Courses in italics are honors courses. 
ENGL 102 Writing for a Liberal Education 

ENGL 190 Honors Writing Semmar 



Category LB. 


Using Information Effectively 


Courses in this 


category focus on 1 ) gathering information from 


print, human and electronic sources, 21 critically evaluating \ 


information, 3) 


using it effectwely in writing and speakmg, and 


4) learning about the various approaches to information in dif- 


ferent branches of knowledge. 


One course is required in this category. Courses in italics are 


honors courses. 




ART 100 


Using Visual Information Effectively 


COMM 100 


Using Information Effectively in Public 




Policy Debate 


cose 111 


Information and Technology for Business 


cose 112 


Honors Information and Technology for 




Business 


cose 119 


Using Information Effectively in the 




Computing Sciences 


DANC 220 


Using Information Effectively in Dance 


EMF 100 


Using Information Effectively in Electronic 




Media and Film 


ENGL 152 


Solving Literary Problems 


ENGL 153 


Honors Solving Literary Problems 


GEOG 230 


Understanding and Communicating 




Through Maps 


HIST 100 


Using Information Effectively in History 


IDHP 100 


Using Information Effectively: Wellness 


IDHPllO 


Information Utilization in the Health 




Professions 


IDHP 111 


Honors Information Utilization in Health 




Professions 


IDNM 101 


Towson Transition: Using Information 




Effectively in Science 


INST 100 


Using Information Effectively: The World 




Today 


ISTC 201 


Using Information Effectively in Education 


ISTC 202 


Honors Vising Information Effectively in 




Education 


LAST 100 


Latin America: Issues and Approaches 


MCOM 100 


Using Information Effectively in Mass 




Communication 


MUSC 100 


Using Information Effectively in Music 


0CTH211 


Philosophy of Occupational Therapy 


PHIL 102 


Using Information Effectively in Philosophy 


POSC 100 


Using Information Effectively: 




Understanding Political Systems 


PSYC 100 


Using Information Effectively in Psychology 


SOCI 100 


Using Information Effectively in Social 




Sciences 


THEA 125 


Script Analysis 


THEA 126 


Honors Script Analysis 



Category I.C. 


College Mathematics 


Courses in this 


category treat concepts and skills in the mathe- 


matical sciences at the level of college algebra and above. They 


emphasize both theoretical foundations and problein-solving 


applications. 




One course is required in this category. Courses in italics are \ 


honors courses. 




ECON 205 


Statistics for Business and Economics I 


MATH 105 


Mathematical Ideas 


MATH 106 


Introduction to Contemporarv 




Mathematics 


MATH 1 1 1 


Algebra for Applications 


MATH 115 


Basic Mathematics for the Sciences 


MATH 119 


Pre-Calculus 


MATH 205 


Mathematical Concepts and Structures II 


MATH 207 


Quantitative and Geometric Reasoning 


MATH 211 


Calculus for Applications 


MATH 231 


Basic Statistics 


MATH 233 


Honors Basic Statistics 


MATH 237 


Elementary Biostatistics 


MATH 263 


Discrete Mathematics 


MATH 273 


Calculus I 


MATH 274 


Calculus II 


MATH 275 


Calculus III 


MATH 283 


Honors Calculus I 


MATH2S4 


Honors Calculus II 


MATH 293 


Honors Seminar in Mathematics 


PSYC 212 


Behavioral Statistics 



Category I.D. 


Advanced Composition 


Courses in this 


category address 11 the discourse models and 


practices impor 


ant to a specific discipline and 2) the techniques 


of formatting, reporting, validation and documentation required \ 


to write success 


fully within the discipline. 


One course is 


required in this category. A grade equivalent of 


2.00 or higher is required to fulfill this requirement. | 


ANTH 401 


Anthropological Theory 


ART 351 


Writing About Art 


BIOL 381 


Biological Literature 


CHEM301 


Professional Ethics for Scientists 


DANC 321 


Responding to Dance 


ECED 422 


Writing Techniques for Teachers in Early 




Childhood Education 


ECON 323 


Comparative Economic Systems 


ECON 325 


Economic Development 


ECON 333 


Economics of Povertv' and Discrimination 


EDUC 301 


Writing and Communication Skills for 




Teachers 


ELED 320 


Foundations of Writing and Other 




Language Arts 


EMF 363 


History of Film 


EMF 377 


Broadcast/Film Writing 


ENGL 310 


Writing Argument 


ENGL 313 


Academic Essay 


ENGL 315 


The Literary Essay 


ENGL 316 


Writing About literature 


ENGL 317 


Writing for Business and Industry 


ENGL 318 


Advanced Informational Writing 


FMST 485 


Writing and Research Methods in Family 




Studies 


FREN410 


Writing About Literature 


GEOG 383 


Natural Resources and Society: 




A Geographic Perspective 


HIST 300 


Introduction to Historical Study 


HLTH 315 


Curriculum .md Planning 


KNES 351 


Philosophy: The Sport Experience 


KNES 353 


Sport and Society 



University Curriculum 



Category l.D. 


continued) 


KNES 357 


Sport'" in Film 


KNES417 


Organization and Administration of Athletic 




Training 


KNES 469 


Research Methods in Exercise Science 


MCOM 356 


Feature Writing 


MCOM 357 


Pubhc Relations Writing 


MUSC 302 


F^istory of Music II 


NURS 433 


Professional Nursing III: Issues 


OCTH 430 


Research Methods in Occupational Therapy 


PHIL 460-469 


Writing Seminar in Philosophical Studies 


PSYC314 


Research Methods in Psychology 


SOCI 300 


Sociological Analysis 


SPPA417 


Technical Writing in the Clinical Process 


THEA 30- 


Theories of Theatre 


WMST 333 


Women's Words, Women's Lives 


WRIT 312 


History of Science 


WRIT 354 


Writing for Criminal Justice 


WRIT 375 


Public Administration 



n. Contexts for Liberal Learning 



Category I.E. 


Creativity and Creative Development 


Courses in this 


category involve students in a specific creative 


activity, emphasizing symbolic, affective and imaginative ways \ 


of knowing. Th 


ey reflect current scholarship in the field, provide 


reference to tbi 


'oretical frameworks and methods, and explore 


the critical standards central to the genre or medium. 


One course is required in this category. Courses in italics are 


honors courses. 




ART 102 


Design for Non-Art Majors 


ART 106 


Drawing for Non-Art Majors 


ART 107 


Ceramics for Non-Art Majors 


ART 109 


Sculpture for Non-Art Majors 


ART 113 


Painting for Non-Art Majors 


ART 117 


Printmaking for Non-Art Majors 


ART 118 


Jewelry for Non-Art Majors 


ART 126 


Fabric Design for Non-Art Majors 


ART 146 


Honors Drawing for Non-Art Majors 


COSC 109 


Computers and Creativity 


COSC 225 


Honors Introduction to LEGO Robotics 


DANC 235 


Dance Composition I 


ENGL 283 


Introduction to Creative Writing 


ENGL 311 


Writing Poetry 


ENGL 312 


Writing Fiction 


ENGL 332 


Honors Writing Fiction 


IDFA 203 


Creativity in the Fine Arts 


THEA 101 


Acting I 


THEA 102 


Honors Acting I 


THEA 142 


Introduction to Theatre Design 


THEA 231 


Mime and Physical Theatre Techniques 


THEA 353 


Costume Design 



Category II. A. 1. 


Scientific Inquiry 


These courses help 


students understand the quantitative and pre- 


dictive nature of the natural sciences as well as the nature of the \ 


scientific method. 


In addition, they explore the historical devel- 


opment and the structural nature of the subject. 


Two courses, one of which must include a lab, are required in 


two separate disciplines or two sequential courses in one disci- 


pline (sequential courses are distinguished by I and 11 in the title 


and are marked in the following list with a superscript 1 or 2); 


in all Category 11 


requirements, no more than three courses in 


one discipline may be taken for GenEd credit. Courses in italics 


are honors courses. 


ASTR 161 


General Astronomy I 


BIOl 105 


Environmental Biology* 


BIOL 110 


Contemporary General Biology 


BIOL112 


Honors Contemporary General Biology 


BIOL 115 


Biological Science I 


BIOL 201' 


Biology I: Cellular Biology and Genetics 


BIOL 202^ 


Biology II: Introduction to Ecology, 




Evolution and Behavior 


BIOL 203 


Honors Biology I: Cellular Biology and 




Genetics 


CHEM 100 


Chemistry and Current Problems* 


CHEM 104 


Introduction to Environmental Chemistry 


CHEM 105- 


Chemistry for Allied Health Professions I 


CHEM 106^ 


Chemistry for Allied Health Professions II 


CHEM 110' 


General Chemistry I 


CHEM IIP 


General Chemistry II 


CHEM 112 


Honors Chemistry for Non-Scientists* 


CHEM lis 


Honors Chemistry for Allied Health 




Professions I 


GEOG 101 


Physical Geography* 


GEOL 121 


Physical Geology 


GEOL 122 


Honors Physical Geology 


GEOL 123 


Historical Geology 


PHSC 101 


Physical Science I 


PHYS 100 


Understanding Physics* 


PHYS 103 


How Things Work* 


PHYS 131 


Light and Color 


PHYS 135 


Introduction to Holography 


PHYS 143 


Physics of Sound and Music (Lab) 


PHYS 202 


General Physics for the Health Sciences 


PHYS 211' 


General Physics I Non-Calculus Based 


PHYS 212- 


General Physics II Non-Calculus-Based 


PHYS 241' 


General Physics I Calculus-Based 


PHYS 242- 


General Physics II Calculus-Based 


PHYS 251' 


Honors General Physics I Calculus-Based 


PHYS 252- 


Honors General Physics II 




Non-Calculus-Based 


* Non-lab course 





University Curriculum 



Category II.A.2. Science, Technology and Modern Society 

These courses develop one or more issues of current importance 
to society and place them in broad scientific, technological, and 
societal contexts. They are designed to help students understand 
how to approach a problem and develop a sense of social 
responsibility and ethics as they pertain to science. Students wilt 
analyze and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of scien- 
tific and technological decisions that have been considered by 
society. 

One course is required in this category IF the two courses in 
U.A.I, equal 7 or fewer units; in all Category II requirements, 
no more than three courses in one discipline may be taken for 
GenEd credit. 

ANTH 341 Information Age Cultures 

ASTR301 Cosmic Origins 

ASTR 302 Honors Cosmic Origins 

BIOL 306 Human Ecology and Sustainability 

BIOL 321 Biology of Women 

BIOL 322 Biotechnology and Society 

BIOL 323 Genes, Evolution and Morality 

BIOL 327 Dangerous Diseases 

BIOL 333 Humans, Science and The Chesapeake Bay 

CLST 311 Science, Technology and Culture 

COSC 311 Digital Technologies in Society 

cose 321 Computerization and Its Impacts 

COSC 418 Ethical and Societal Concerns of Computer 

Scientists 
ENGL 301 Rhetoric and Science 

ENVS 301 People and Pests 

GERO 310 Social Issues in Human Lifestyle Technology 

HLTH218 Women's Health 

IDEA 301 Cities and Suburbs as Human Habitats 

IDNM 305 Ethics, Science and Society 

IDNM 307 Women, Gender and Science 

IDNM 309 Women, Society and Radiation Science 

IDNM 311 Human Genetics 

IDNM Ml Honors Human Genetics 

IDNM 3 1 3 Plagues and People 

IDNM 314 Comparative Social Behavior of Humans 

and Nonhuman Primates 
IDNM 315 Networks: The Science of Connections 

KNES 321 The Science of Sports Success: 

Contributions of Genetics and Practice 
MATH 305 Chance 

OCTH 301 Genetics, Health and Society 

PHIL 319 Science, Technology and Values 

PSYC 301 Science, Pseudoscience and Superstition 

WMST 339 Reproductive Technologies and the Future 

of Motherhood 



Category U.B.I. American Experience: Arts and Humanities 

These courses engage students in a critical assessment of how 
their oivn experience is affected by American traditions in the 
arts and humanities and how the methodologies of these disci- 
plines can help them better understand American culture. 

One course is required in this category; the discipline {i.e., 
ENGL, HIST) chosen must be different than in II.C.l.; in all 
Category II requirements, no more than three courses in one 
discipline may be taken for GenEd credit. Courses in italics 
are honors courses. 

AMST 201 Introduction to American Studies 

ART 115 American Traditions in Painting 

ARTH 1 13 Myths and Stories in American Art 

DANC 127 Introduction to Dance: The American 

Experience 
DANC 200 Our Dance Corridor 

ENGL 230 Main Currents in American Literature 

ENGL 231 American Literature to 1865 

ENGL 232 American Literature Since 1865 

ENGL 236 American Indian Literature, 1772-Present 

HIST 145 History of the United States to the Mid- 

19th Century 
HIST 146 History of the United States Since the Mid- 

19th Century 
HIST 148 Honors History of the United States Since 

the Mid-I9th Century 
HIST 162 Honors Survey: American Indian History 

IDEA 201 American Vision: Baltimore Visual and 

Performing Arts 
IDEA 202 Honors American Vision: Baltimore Visual 

and Performing Arts 
MUSC 111 Introduction to American Music 

MUSC 123 History of Jazz 

MLfSC 125 Honors History of Jazz 

MUSC 127 Elements and History of Rock Music 

MUSC 201 Music in the United States: Analytic 

Emphasis 
THEA 103 Introduction to American Theatre 



Category II. B. 2. American Experience: Social and 
Behavioral Sciences 

These courses engage students in a critical assessment of how 
social and behavioral studies of American experience extend 
their understanding of themselves and others and how the 
methodologies of the social and behavioral sciences help them 
better understand American culture, behavior, or social and 
political institutions. 

One course is required in this category'; the discipline (i.e., 
ECON, POSC) chosen must be different than in II.C.2.; in all 
Category II requirements, no more than three courses in one 
discipline may be taken for GenEd credit. Courses in italics 
are honors courses. 

ANTH 209 Anthropology of American Culture 

ANTH 21 1 Hom)rs Anthropology of American Culture 

ECON 202 Macroeconomic Principles 

ECON 204 Honors Macroeconomic Principles 

FMST 101 Introduction to Family Studies 

POSC 103 American National (Government 

POSC 207 State Government 

POSC 209 Introduction to Law 

POSC 2 1 2 Honors in Political Science 

PSYC 203 Human Development 

P.SYC204 H(mors Human Development 

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology 

SOCI 102 Honors Introduction to Sociology 



University Curriculum 



I 



Category 11.8.3. American Experience: Contemporary Issues 


These courses 


engage students in a critical analysis of signifi- 


cant issues in 


contemporary American experience. They help 


students use their content and methodology to understand the | 


dynamics of A 


merican society. 


One course is required; no more than three courses in one 


discipline may be taken for GenEd credit in all Category II 


requirements. 


Courses in italics are honors courses. 


CLST201 


Introduction to Cultural Studies 


CLST202 


Honors Introduction to Cultural Studies 


COMM 131 


Fundamentals of Speech Communication 


CO MM 132 


Honors Fundamentals of Speech 




Communication 


DANC 101 


The Alexander Technique 


DANC 105 


Movement Skills Enhancement for Men 


DANC 106 


Fundamentals of Dance Movement 


EDUC 201 


The Parenting Process 


ELED 201 


School and American Society 


EMF 140 


Introduction to Electronic Media 


FMST 201 


Family Resources 


GERO 101 


Introduction to Gerontology 


HLTH 101 


Wellness for a Diverse Society 


HLTH 102 


Honors Wellness for a Diverse Society 


HLTH 207 


Health Care in the U.S. 


HLTH 217 


Honors Health Care in the U.S. 


IDEA 207 


Applied Ethics & Aesthetics in Fine Arts 




and Communications 


KNES 235 


Individualized Fitness 


MUSC 114 


Music Technology in American Society 


OCTH 103 


Leisure and Health Issues in Contemporary 




Society 


PHIL 253 


Contemporary Ethical Problems 


PHIL 255 


Environmental Ethic 


SOCI 210 


Sociology of Sport 


SPPA 205 


Basic Sign Language 


SPPA 207 


Honors Basic Sign Language 


WMST 235 


American Women and Popular Culture 



Category II.C.l. 


Western Heritage: Arts and Humanities 


These courses engage students in understanding how the Western | 


heritage marks 


their contemporary experience, positively or 


negatively. 




One course is required in this category; the discipline {i.e.. 


ENGL, HIST) chosen must be different than in II.B.l.; no more 


than three courses in one discipline may be taken for GenEd 


credit in all Category II requirements. Courses in italics are 


honors courses. 




ARTH 109 


Art and the Human Body 


ARTH 207 


Honors: Seminar in Art History' 


ARTH 221 


Survey of Western Art 


ARTH 222 


Survey of Western Art II 


DANC 123 


Introduction to Dance: European Court 


DANC 125 


Introduction to Dance: Overview 


DANC 133 


Honors Introduction to Dance: European 




Court 


ENGL 205 


Shakespeare for Non-Majors 


ENGL 221 


British Literature to 1798 


ENGL 222 


British Literature since 1798 


ENGL 240 


Classics of the Western Heritage 


ENGL 243 


Introduction to Classical Mythology 


ENGL 261 


Tradition and Form in Western Poetry 


ENGL 263 


Tradition and Form in Western Fiction 


ENGL 265 


Tradition and Form in Western Drama 


ENGL 290 


Honors Seminar in Literature 


FREN 101 


French Elements I 


FREN 102 


French Elements II 


GERM 101 


German Elements I 


GERM 102 


German Elements II 


GRK 101 


Elements of Modern Greek I 


GRK 102 


Elements of Modern Greek II 


HIST 101 


Introduction to Ancient Civilization 


HIST 102 


History of European Civilization through 




the 1 7th Century 


HIST 103 


History of European Civilization from the 




17th Century 


HIST 105 


Byzantine Empires and Balkans to 1821 


HIST 108 


Honors History of European Civilization 




from the 1 7th Century 


HIST 231 


History of Russian Civilization 


ITAL 101 


Italian Elements I 


ITAL 102 


Italian Elements II 


LATN 101 


Latin Elements I 


LATN 102 


Latin Elements II 


LATN 201 


Latin Intermediate I 


LATN 202 


Latin Intermediate II 


LATN 301 


Advanced Readings in Latin I 


LATN 302 


Advanced Readings in Latin II 


MUSC 101 


Introduction to Music of the Western 




Heritage 


MUSC 105 


Elements of Western Music Theory 


MUSC J 06 


Honors Introduction to Music of the 




Western Heritage 



University Curriculum 



Category Il.C.l. 


(continued) 


PHIL 101 


Introduction to Philosophy 


PHIL 103 


Introduction to Ethics 


PHIL 111 


Logic 


PHIL 112 


Honors Logic 


PHIL 212 


Honors Special Studies in Philosophy 


PHIL 221 


Ancient Greek Philosophy 


RUSS 101 


Russian Elements I 


RUSS 102 


Russian Elements II 


SPAN 101 


Spanish Elements I 


SPAN 102 


Spanish Elements II 


THEA 241 


Costume, Dress and Society: Egyptian to 




Elizabethan 


THEA242 


Costume, Dress and Society: 




Elizabethan to 1950 


THEA 243 


Honors Costume, Dress and Society: 




Egyptian to Elizabethan 


THEA 244 


Honors Costume, Dress and Society: 




Elizabethan to 1950 



Category II.C.2. Western Heritage: Social and Behavioral 
Sciences 

These courses engage students in a critical assessment of how 
social and behavioral studies and their methodologies help them 
better understand Western culture, behavior, or social and polit- 
ical institutions. 

One course is required in this category; the discipline {i.e., 
ECON, POSC) chosen must be different than in ILB.2.; no more 
than three courses in one discipline may be taken for GenEd 
credit in all Category II requirements. Courses in italics are 
honors courses. 

ECON 201 Microeconomic Principles 

ECON 203 Honors Microeconomic Principles 

GEOG 109 Introduction to Human Geography 

GEOG 110 Honors Introduction to Human 

Geography 
POSC 101 Introduction to Political Science 

POSC 102 Honors Introduction to Political Science 

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology 

PSYC 102 Honors Introduction to Psychology 



Category n.C.3. Western Heritage: Cultural Plurality and 


Diversity 




These courses explore race, class, gender, religious or ethnic tra- 


ditions, or minority issues and investigate how Western pre- 


judgements, systems or traditions contribute to issues in diversity. 


One course 


is required in this category; no more than three 


courses in one 


discipline may be taken for GenEd credit in all 


Categon' II requirements. Courses in italics are honors courses. \ 


AFST261 


Main Themes in African-American Studies 


EDUC 203 


Teaching and Learning in a Diverse Society- 


EMF 205 


Women and Gender in Film 


ENGL 233 


Survey of African-.American Literature 


ENGL 234 


Major Writers in African-American 




Literature 


ENGL 235 


Ethnic-American Literature 


ENGL 239 


19th and 20th-century Jewish Literature 


ENGL 253 


The Bible and Literature 


ENGL 349 


Honors 19th and 20th Century Jewish 




Literature 


FREN 201 


French Intermediate I 


FREN 202 


French Intermediate II 


FREN 301 


French Composition and Conversation I 


FREN 302 


French Composition and Conversation D 


GERAl 201 


German Intermediate I 


GERM 202 


German Intermediate II 


GERM 301 


German Composition and Conversation I 


GERM 302 


German Composition and Conversation II 


HLTH 220 


Sexuality in Diverse Societies 


ITAL 201 


Italian Intermediate I 


ITAL 202 


Italian Intermediate II 


ITAL 301 


Italian Composition and Conversation I 


ITAL 302 


Italian Composition and Conversation II 


LGST 101 


Introduction to Lesbian and Gay Studies 


MUSC 205 


Women in Western Music 


NURS416 


Multicultural Health Care 


PHIL 204 


Race, Class and Gender 


PHIL 251 


African-American Philosophy 


RLST 206 


Judaism, Christianity and Islam 


RUSS 201 


Russian Intermediate I 


RUSS 202 


Russian Intermediate II 


SOCI 241 


Blacks in America: Myths and Reality 


SOCI 243 


Sociology of Race, Class and Gender 


SPAN 201 


Spanish Intermediate I . 


SPAN 202 


Spanish Intermediate II 


SPAN 203 


Honors Spanish Intermediate I 


SPAN 301 


Composition and Conversation I 


SPAN 302 


Composition and Conversation II 


THEA 303 


Cultural Diversity in Contemporary Theater 


THEA 304 


Honors Cultural Diversity in Contemporary 




Theater 


WMST 231 


Women in Perspective 


WMST 232 


Honors Seminar: Women in Perspective 



University Curriculum 



Category II.D. 


Global Awareness: Non-Western Cultures, 


Traditions, Issues | 


These courses 


focus specifically or comparatively (among non- 


Westeni civHn 


•ations or between non-Western/Western civiliza- 


tions) on helping students understand multiple modes of human | 


expression am 


i experience. 


One course 


is required; no more than three courses in one 


discipline may be taken for GenEd credit in all Category II \ 


requirements. 


Courses in italics are honors courses. 


ANTH 207- 


Cultural Anthropology 


ANTH208 


Human Evolution and Prehistory 


ANTH 210 


Honors Cultural Anthropology' 


ARAB 101 


Arabic Elements 


ARTH 105 


Art in the Culture 


ARTH 107 


Art: Themes, Dreams and Visions 


ARTH 108 


Introduction to Non-Western Art 


ARTH 20S 


Honors: Seminar in Non-Western Art 




History 


CHNS 101 


Elementary Modern Chinese I 


CHNS 102 


Elementary Modern Chinese II 


CHNS 201 


Chinese Intermediate I 


CHNS 202 


Chinese Intermediate II 


CHNS 301 


Chinese Composition and Conversation I 


CHNS 302 


Chinese Composition and Conversation II 


COMM 378 


Intercultural Communication 


ENGL 244 


World Folklore 


ENGL 248 


Literature of Global Experience 


GEOG 102 


World Regional Geography 


GEOG 105 


Geography of International Affairs 


HEBR 101 


Elements of Hebrew I 


HEBR 102 


Elements of Hebrew II 


HEBR 201 


Hebrew Intermediate I 


HEBR 202 


Hebrew Intermediate II 


HEBR 301 


Hebrew Composition and Conversation I 


HEBR 302 


Hebrew Composition and Conversation II 


HIST 107 


Introduction to History of Islamic 




Civilization 


HIST 109 


Introduction to the Civilization of India 


HIST 110 


East Asian Civilization to the 17th Century 


HIST 111 


East Asian Civilization Since the 17th 




Century 


HIST 117 


Islamic History 


HIST 121 


Latin America: Colonial Period 


HIST 122 


Latin America: National Period 


HIST 135 


African History and Culture 


HIST 150 


Europe and the Non-European World 


HIST 151 


The World Since 1945 


HLTH 201 


International Health 


JPNS 101 


Japanese Elements I 


JPNS 102 


Japanese Elements II 


JPNS 201 


Japanese Intermediate I 


JPNS 202 


Japanese Intermediate II 


JPNS 301 


Japanese Composition and Conversation I 


JPNS 302 


Japanese Composition and Conversation II 


KNES 285 


Sport: A Cross-Cultural Perspective 


MUSCllO 


Honors World Music 


MUSC112 


World Music: Americas, Africa, West 




Europe 


MUSC 113 


World Music: East Europe, Asia, the Middle 




East 


OCTH 205 


Alternative and Complimentary Health Care 


PHIL 219 


Introduction to Asian Philosophy 


POSC 105 


Governments of the World 


POSC 107 


Introduction to International Relations 


POSC 108 


Honors International Relations 


REST 105 


Introduction to the Study of Religion 


REST 205 


Women in World Religions 


WMST 233 


International Perspectives of Women 


WMST234 


Honors: International Perspectives of Women 




University Curriculum 



General Education Requirements Checklist 

Use this form to keep track of how many General Education requirements you've completed. 



Category I: Skills for Liberal Learning (one course in each subcategory) 

LA. Writing for a Liberal Education 

LB. Using Information Effectively 

LC. College Mathematics 

LD. Advanced Composition 

LE. Creativity and Creative Development 



Category II: Contexts for Liberal Learning 

• one course is required in each of the subcategories except 11. A. 1. 

• II. A. I . requires tivo courses '', including at least one 4-unit lab course; if 
two 4-unit lab science courses are completed, the II. A. 2. requirement is 
waived 

• no more than 3 courses can be in the same discipline 

• II.B.l. and II.C.l. must be from different disciplines 

• II.B.l. and II.C.l. nmst be from different disciplines 

II. A. 1. Scientific Inquiry * (Lab) 



and 



II. A2. Upper-Level Science, Technology and Modern Society 

II. B. American Experience 

II.B.l. Arts and Humanities 

II. B. 2. Social and Behavioral Sciences 

II. B. 3. Contemporary Issues 

II.C. Western Heritage 

II.C.l. Arts and Humanities 

II.C.2. Social and Behavioral Sciences 

II.C. 3. Cultural Plurality and Diversity 

II. D. Global Awareness: Non- Western Cultures, Traditions, Issues . 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

All students must complete: 

• a minimum of 120 earned degree counting units 
including 32 upper-level units (300 level or above) 

• a cumulative GPA of 2.00 or higher 

• all departmental requirements from an officially declared major 

• all General Education requirements (GenEds) as outlined above 



University Curriculum 



TRANSFER PACKAGES 

Towson University offers Transfer Packages to newly enrolled 
transfer students. The packages vary according to the General 
Education (GenEd) requirements completed at the sending institu- 
tion. 

A Transfer Package A, B, or C will be awarded to students meet- 
ing the following criteria prior to matriculation at Towson 
University: 40 transferable credits of liberal arts course work com- 
parable to courses that native Towson University students may use 
to satisfy GenEd and, as part of the 40 credits, the completion of 
the minimum MHEC (Maryland Higher Education Commission) 
General Education requirements. 



CHOOSING A MAJOR 

The General Education (GenEd) requirements allow students to 
explore a broad range of subjects, while the major and minor pro- 
vide in-depth study of one or more fields. A major may require as 
few as 30 hours or as many as 70 hours. The exact number varies 
and is set by the academic department. 

All students are asked to declare a major during their initial reg- 
istration. Those who are not sure which major they wish to pursue 
will be designated as "undecided." In order to add or change a 
major or minor, students must complete a Declaration of 
Major/Minor Form in the Registrar's Customer Service Center, 
Enrollment Services, room 223. 



Minimum Requirements for GenEd Transfer Packages 

Transfer packages will be awarded provided the following 
requirements are completed prior to matriculation at Towson 
University: 

• Minimum MHEC requirements; 

• One college-level freshman composition course (Towson 
graduation requirement: a grade equivalent of a 2.00 or higher 
must be earned) 

• One college-level mathematics course (Prerequisite: two years 
of high school algebra) 

• Two science courses (one must he a lab) 

• Two arts/humanities courses (must be different disciplines) 

• Two social science courses (must be different disciplines) 

• Additional liberal arts requirements: 

• Emerging issues course (must include information technology) 

• One cultural diversity course 

• One global awareness course 

Package A 

• 40 units toward GenEd completed at sending 
institution 

• 6 units of GenEd courses required at Towson 

• I.D. Advanced Composition (Upper-Level) 

• II. A. 2. Science, Technology and Modern Society (Upper-Level) 

Package B 

• 40+ units toward GenEd completed at sending institution 

• 7.5+ science units toward GenEd completed at sending 
institution 

• ILA.2. Science, Technology and Modern Society WAIVED 

• 3 units of GenEd required at Towson 

• LD. Advanced Composition (Upper-Level) 

Package C Baccalaureate Institution Transfers Only 

• 44-46 units of GenEd required and completed at 
sending institution 

• GenEd SATISFIED IN TRANSFER 

Course work for transfer students not awarded a GenEd pack- 
age will be applied toward Towson's GenEd requirements on a 
course-by-course basis. 

AAT Elementary Education Articulation 

Maryland public community college students who have earned 
AAT degrees (Associate of Arts Degree in Teaching) will be awarded 
64 credits in transfer "without further review," in accordance with 
MHEC policy, toward the elementary education major at Towson. 
Students are encouraged to contact the elementary education 
department chairperson at their institutions for specific details and 
program deadlines. 

Course work for students who do not complete all requirements 
of the AAT degree, will be applied toward Towson's GenEd and 
major requirements on a course-by-course basis. 



Changes in Terminology 

Students use Towson Online Services to register for classes and 
track their academic progress. Please note that some academic 
terms used online and in the catalog are interchangeable. For exam- 
ple: majors and minors are referred to as Academic Plans; concen- 
trations and tracks are referred to as Academic Sub-Plans. 

Major 

A major consists of courses required of a particular discipline that 
may include both lower-level (100-200) and upper-level (300-400) 
courses within and outside the discipline. A grade equivalent of 
2.00 or higher is required in all courses completed toward the 
major, and a minimum cumulative Grade Point Averate (GPA) of 
2.00 must be earned in the major. 

Double Major 

A double major combines the requirements of two majors, allow- 
ing students to complete both majors by taking fewer units than if 
each major were completed separately. 

Minor 

An institutionally approved set of courses within a major area of 
study, or a separate, distinct thematic area of study consisting of at 
least 18, or no more than 30 units. A minimum of 12 units must be 
upper-level courses (300-400 numbered courses) and no more than 
12 units can be taken outside of the minor or thematic discipline. 

Concentration 

In some departments the major is further divided into concentra- 
tions. A concentration is a focused area of study involving approx- 
imately 15 to 24 units. Because the university formally recognizes 
concentrations, they will appear on students' academic records. 
Students interested in a particular concentration within a major 
should contact the department for details. 

Track 

A track is a university-approved area of focus within a larger area 
of study, but, unlike a concentration, it has not been formally 
approved by the Maryland Higher Education Commission 
(MHEC). Because it does not carry formal recognition, it may not 
appear on the academic record. 

Screened/Competitive Majors 

Some programs of study are screened. Students must meet certain 
academic and/or curricular criteria, such as completing prerequisite 
courses or attaining a specific average, before they are admitted to 
these programs. 

Other programs of study, while not officially approved screened 
majors, are competitive. Students must either submit a portfolio of 
work or audition before they are admitted to these programs. 
Examples of competitive majors include Art, Music and Dance. 

The criteria are published in the applicable sections of this cata- 
log. Admission to the university does not guarantee admission to 
screened or competitive programs. 



University Curriculum 



Out-of-State Students 

Recognizing the advantage of a diverse student body, the universi- 
ty welcomes out-of-state applicants to its screened programs. 
However, because the university is partially supported by Maryland 
taxpayers, the proportion of out-of-state students admitted to its 
screened programs must be limited. Therefore, no more than 25 
percent of each class of new students admitted to screened pro- 
grams will be out-of-state residents unless qualified in-state stu- 
dents are unavailable. 

COLLEGES 

The university comprises seven colleges: the College of Business 
and Economics, the College of Education, the College of Fine Arts 
and Communication, the College of Health Professions, the College 
of Liberal Arts, the College of Science and Mathematics and the 
College of Graduate Studies and Research. 

Once students have determined a program of study, they become 
a member of, and graduate from, the academic college administer- 
ing the program. 

College of Business and Economics 

The mission of the College of Business and Economics (CBE) is to 
provide successful graduates with Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes 
(KSAs) that employers want. Dynamic partnerships with business, 
government, and nonprofit organizations enhance the academic 
program. The Accounting and Business Administration programs 
are accredited by AACSB International: The Association to 
Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Students earn degrees in 
accounting, business administration, electronic business and 
economics. Within the business administration major, students 
choose among concentrations in international business, finance, 
management or marketing, or tracks in economics, human resource 
management or legal studies. Courses toward finance planning cer- 
tification are also offered. 

College of Education 

The mission of teacher education at Towson University is to 
inspire, educate, and prepare educators as facilitators of active 
learning for diverse and inclusive populations in environments that 
are technologically advanced. The teacher education unit is accred- 
ited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education. 

As the first teacher-training institution in Maryland, Towson 
University has been preparing men and women for teaching careers 
for more than 139 years. Today, the College of Education has a 
nationwide reputation as a leader in teacher education. Programs 
of study lead to the baccalaureate degree in education with certifi- 
cation to teach Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, 
and Special Education. In addition, the college offers programs that 
lead to teacher certification in secondary education and K-12 edu- 
cation for students enrolled in other colleges of the university. 

College of Fine Arts and Communication 

Recognized as a fine arts center for Maryland, the College of Fine 
Arts and Communication trains talented men and women to pur- 
sue careers in the arts and communication. Additionally, the col- 
lege offers all TU students the opportunity to participate in both 
academic and artistic experiences in these areas. 

Because the creative process involves close dialogue between 
teacher and student, programs are structured to allow for individ- 
ual attention. All programs provide a broad liberal education as 
well as specialized professional training. 

College of Health Professions 

The departments of the College of Health Professions have the 
common goal of preparing students to provide human services 
designed to improve the quality of life. The college is composed of 
the departments of Audiology, Speech-Language Pathology and 



Deaf Studies, Health Science, Kinesiology, Nursing, and 
Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science, and college- 
based programs in Allied Health and Physicians Assistant Studies. 
Graduates of the baccalaureate programs in Nursing and 
Occupational Therapy are eligible to sit for their respective certifi- 
cation examinations. 

A major in the College of Health Professions can prepare stu- 
dents for one of many health care and sport-related careers. Some 
examples include community health education, speech and lan- 
guage pathology, hospital management, medical technology, athletic 
training, teaching physical education, coaching, sports informa- 
tion, recreation leadership, research, government service and health 
education. 

College of Liberal Arts 

A liberal arts education provides students with the opportunity 
to explore the world of ideas and values, to appreciate cultural 
diversity, and to deepen their understanding of human nature and 
society, locally, nationally and globally. The liberal arts major pre- 
pares students for today's job market by teaching the skills and 
competencies employers are seeking: the ability to think critically; 
communicate effectively; research, organize and analyze data; work 
as a member of a team; and problem solve. 

The College of Liberal Arts offers a student-centered learning 
experience that emphasizes teaching excellence, scholarship and 
creativity through internships, research opportunities, community 
service and study abroad. More than 2,500 undergraduates major 
in liberal arts programs and 500 graduate students pursue master's 
degrees. 

The liberal arts are ideas at work. Upon graduation, students 
pursue graduate programs or careers in areas as diverse as urban 
planning, teaching, law, journalism, publishing, counseling, busi- 
ness and public service. 

College of Science and Mathematics 

The College of Science and Mathematics provides students with the 
science, mathematics and technology dimension of their liberal 
education. Courses are offered in all of the traditional physical, 
mathematical and life sciences disciplines. Programs are vigorous, 
yet highly flexible. Students may choose a traditional science major 
or may elect cross-disciplinary majors, such as Environmental 
Science and Studies; Molecular Biology; Biochemistry, and 
Bioinformatics; or Forensic Chemistry. A Dual-Degree Engineering 
program; pre-professional preparation in pharmacy, medicine, den- 
tistry, veterinary medicine and physical therapy; and international 
studies programs leading to a Master of Science are also available. 
Students who major in Mathematics or in one of the sciences may 
also pursue certification to teach at the secondary or elementary 
level. 

College of Graduate Studies and Research 

The College of Graduate Studies and Research has expanded pro- 
grams and streamlined administrative processes to accommodate a 
graduate student population which has grown to more than 3,400 
students. The mission of the Graduate School at Towson University 
is to provide programs of study that will allow individuals to 
advance their knowledge, increase their practical skills, and develop 
leadership abilities in a broad spectrum of professions. The College 
of Graduate Studies and Research also aims to help students 
enhance knowledge of their disciplines through collaboration on 
research projects with faculty; to be actively engaged in the process 
of improving the quality of life for others and themselves; and to 
develop the desire in each individual to become a continuous life- 
long learner. The college currently administers four doctoral, 3h 
master's and 22 certificate programs. 

A hallmark of graduate education at Towson is the emphasis on 
applied programs that provide the skills and knowledge needed by 
career professionals. Faculty and student research is closely related 
to graduate education and advances the college's mission as well as 



University Curriculum 



that of Towson University. The Office of University Research 
Services (OURS) was established to assist faculty and staff in 
obtaining external support for research and scholarly activity. It 
serves the dual function of protecting the university' 's interests in 
matters relating to external funding, while providing a high level of 
service to university faculty and staff members in identif\ing fund- 
ing opportunities, and submitting complete and competitive 
proposals for research and scholarly projects. In fiscal year 2004, 
Towson University received more than $8.4 million in external 
funding for research and other scholarly projects. 

HONORS COLLEGE 

Cook Library 524, 410-704-4677 
E-mail: honors@towson.edu 
www.towson.edu/honors 

Towson University Honors is designed for students who have 
demonstrated superior academic performance in high school, and 
who wish to pursue unique academic and social opportunities 
while attending the university. Students may major in any field at 
Towson University and be part of the Honors College. At Towson, 
the Honors College is a true community of scholars. Honors stu- 
dents are encouraged to seek intellectual excellence and leadership 
through opportunities that go beyond the routine college experi- 
ence. 

Curriculum 

Students graduating from the Honors College must complete 18 to 
24 units of required Honors course work with a grade of C or bet- 
ter. The following distinctions are made at graduation: 

Honors 

• Minimum of 3.50 GPA 

• Completion of 18 units in honors courses 

Honors with Distinction 

• Minimum of 3.50 GPA 

• Completion of 18 units in honors courses 

• Completion of 6-9 units in Honors Thesis or 
Departmental Honors 

Many of the courses are honors sections of General Education 
(GenEd) courses, but some courses are unique to the Honors 
College. There are Honors College courses in a wide range of aca- 
demic disciplines; for example, anthropology, art history, biology, 
chemistry, mass communication and communication studies, eco- 
nomics, English, history, philosophy, political science, psychology, 
sociology, and women's studies. Honors College courses, taught by 
outstanding faculty committed to excellence in undergraduate 
education, are designed to facilitate discussion and 
collaborative learning. 

Admission Requirements 

Students are considered for admission to the Honors College based 
on several indicators of academic excellence: high SAT scores; class 
rank; performance in high school; and a well-written application 
essay. The Honors College has historically admitted the top 10 per- 
cent of the entering freshman class. 

Students transferring from another college or university must 
have a 3.50 minimum GPA to be considered for participation in the 
Honors College. Transfer students may use a maximum of two 
honors-designated courses from another institution in completing 
degree requirements. 

Benefits 

TU students in the Honors College can take advantage of the fol- 
lowing benefits: 

• They may attend small, informal discussion sessions with 
faculty. 



• They have priority scheduling for course registration. 

• They may take classes not offered to the rest of the university, 
including seminars, special focus courses, and study abroad pro- 
grams. 

• They have access to special campus facilities including honors 
housing and an honors computer/study lounge. 

• They are eligible for special scholarship support. 

• They may participate in special service initiatives or peer men- 
toring. 

Special Scholarship Opportunities 

Honors College scholarships are available only to incoming fresh- 
men in amounts from $500 to $3,000 as a one-time offer. The 
scholarships are awarded on a competitive basis to students admit- 
ted to the Honors College. The Honors College Selection 
Committee chooses the scholarship recipients. The recipients are 
required to remain in good standing in the Honors College each 
year to continue to receive the scholarship. 

HONORS COLLEGE COURSES 

This is a complete listing by General Education category. (See 

Course Descriptions for more detailed information.) 

GenEd LA. 

Writing for a Liberal Education 

ENGL 190 Honors Writing Seminar 

GenEd LB. 

Using Information Effectively 

C05C 112 Honors Information and Technology for Business 

ENGL 153 Honors Solving Literary Probletns 

IDHP 1 1 1 Honors Information Utilization in Health Professions 

ISTC 202 Honors Using Information Effectively in Education 

THEA 126 Honors Script Analysis 

GenEd LC. 

College Mathematics 

MATH 233 Honors Basic Statistics 

MATH 2S3 Honors Calculus I 

MATH 2S4 Honors Calculus II 

MATH 2'-> 5 Honors Seminar in Mathematics 

GenEd I.D. 

Advanced Composition 

KNES 354 Sport and Society 

GenEd I.E. 

Creativity and Creative Development 

ART 146 Honors Drawing for Non-Art Majors 

COSC 225 Introduction to Lego Robotics 
ENGL 332 Honors Writing Fiction 
THEA 102 Honors Acting I 

GenEd Il.A.l. 
Scientific Inquiry 

BIOL 112 Honors Contemporary General Biology 

BIOL 203 Honors Biology T. Cellular Biology and Genetics 

CHEM 1 J 2 Honors Chemistry for Non-Scientists 

CHEM ; 15 Honors Chemistry for Allied Health Professions I 

GEOL 122 Honors Physical Geology 

PHYS 251 Honors General Physics I Calculus-Based 

PHYS 252 Honors General Physics II Calculus-Based 

GenEd II.A.2. 

Science, Technology and Modern Society 

ASTR 302 Honors Cosmic Origins 

IDNM 312 Honors Human Genetics 



University Curriculum 



GenEdll.B.l. 

American Experience: Arts and Humanities 

HIST 148 Honors History of the United States Since the 

Mid-I9th Century 
HIST 162 Honors Native American History 

IDFA 202 Honors American Vision: Baltmiore Visual and 

Performing Arts 
MUSC 125 Honors History of Jazz 

GenEd II.B.2. 

American Experience: Social and Behavioral Sciences 

ANTH 211 Honors Anthropology of American Culture 
ECON 204 Honors Macroeconomic Principles 
POSC 212 Honors in Political Science 

PSYC 204 Honors Human Development 

SOCI 102 Honors Introduction to Sociology 

GenEd n.B.3. 

American Experience: Contemporary Issues 

CLST 202 Honors Introduction to Cultural Studies 

COMM 132 Honors Fundamentals of Speech 

Communication 
HLTH 1 02 Honors Wellness for a Diverse Society 
HLTH 217 Honors Health Care in the U.S. 
SPPA 207 Honors Basic Sign Language 

GenEd II.C.l. 

Western Heritage: Arts and Humanities 

ARTH 207 Honors: Seminar in Art History 

DANC 133 Honors Introduction to Dance: European Court 

ENGL 290 Honors Seminar in Literature 

HIST 108 Honors History of European Civilization from the 17th 

Century 
MUSC 106 Honors Introduction tu Music of the Western 

Heritage 
PHIL 112 Honors Logic 

PHIL 212 Honors: Special Studies in Philosophy 

THEA 243 Honors Costume. Dress and Society: Egyptian 

to Elizabethan 
THEA 244 Honors Costume, Dress and Society: Elizabethan to 

1950 

GenEd II.C.l. 

Western Heritage: Social and Behavioral Sciences 

ECON 203 Honors Microeconomic Principles 
GEOG 110 Honors Introduction to Human Geography 
POSC 102 Honors Introduction to Political Science 

PSYC 102 Honors Introduction to Psychology 

GenEd II.C.3. 

Western Heritage: Cultural Plurality and Diversity 

ENGL 249 Honors I'Hh and 10th Century Jewish Literature 

SPAN 203 Honors Spanish Intermediate I 

THEA 304 Honors Cultural Diversity in Contemporary 

Theatre 
WMST 232 Honors Seminar: Women in Perspective 

GenEd II.D. 

Global Awareness: Non-Western Cultures, Tradition and Issues 

ANTH 210 Honors Cultural Anthropology 

ARTH 208 Honors: Seminar in Non-Western Art History 

MUSC 110 Honors Introduction to World Music 

POSC 108 Honors International Relations 

WMST 234 Honors International Perspectives of Women 

Other Honors Courses 

ACCT 21 1 Honors Accounting Principles I 

ACCT 212 Honors Accounting Principles II 

HONR 171 Honors Community Building 
HONR 470 Honors Special Topics 



HONR 490 Travel m Honors 
HONR 491 Study in Honors 
HONR 495 Honors Thesis 

MCOM 102 Honors Introduction to Mass Communications 
SOCI 197 Honors Seminar in Community Power Analysis 

and additional Honors special topics courses 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

The Departmental Honors Program represents intensive and indi- 
vidualized but directed education beyond the normal course of 
instruction. This program includes 6 to 9 units in seminars, directed 
readings (tutorials), and research projects in the major. A senior 
thesis is required, as is an oral defense of the thesis. 

To be admitted to the program, students must present a cumula- 
tive GPA of 3.25 and a 3.50 average in their discipline, or have the 
permission of their faculty adviser. These minimum averages must 
be maintained for graduation as a Departmental Honors Program 
participant. Students who complete an approved program will 
receive a diploma and transcript with the designation. Bachelor of 
Science or Bachelor of Arts with Honors, in the appropriate disci- 
pline. Currently, the departments of Art; Biological Sciences; 
Computer and Information Sciences; Economics; Electronic Media 
and Film; English; History; Kinesiology: Mass Communication and 
Communication Studies; Mathematics; Modern Languages; 
Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences; Political Science; Psychology; 
Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice; and Women's 
Studies offer departmental honors programs. Details of each 
department's honors requirements may be obtained from the 
appropriate chairperson. 

DEAN'S LIST 

Office of the Provost, 410-704-2125 

Full-time degree candidates are eligible for Dean's List recognition 

each fall and spring term provided they complete a minimum of 12 

calculable units and attain a 3.50 or higher GPA. 

Part-time degree candidates are eligible for Dean's List recogni- 
tion each academic year provided they complete a minimum of 12 
calculable units and attain a 3.50 or higher GPA during that aca- 
demic year. An academic year is designated as fall through summer 
and includes the January Minimester. 

Applicable course work is only that in which calculable grades 
(A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F, FX) are earned. Pass 
(PS), Audit (AU), and SatisfactoryAJnsatisfactory (SAJ) grades do 
not apply toward the 12-unit minimum. 

Additionally, students who receive Incomplete (I) grades for the 
term are not eligible for Dean's List honors in that term, nor may 
they retroactively receive those honors once the work is made up 
and a letter grade is earned. 

GRADUATION WITH LATIN HONORS 

Graduation Office, Enrollment Services Center 225 
410-704-2095 

To receive a bachelor's degree with honors, students must first have 
completed 60 units of undergraduate work at Toivson University 
with the following cumulative GPA: 



3.75 to 4.00 
3.55 to 3.74 
3.40 to 3.54 



Summa Cum Laude 
Magna Cum Laude 
Cum Laude 



In addition, transfer students must have a cumulative 3.40 or 
better average for all work completed at other institutions. 

Students who do not qualify for honors because their TU or 
transfer GPA is not a 3.40 or higher will be evaulated based on 
their last 60 units at Towson. These students nuist have a cumula- 
tive average of 3.55 or higher in their last 60 units and will only be 
eligible for Cum Laude honors. Latin honors are evaluated auto- 
matically according to both the regular and alternate honors 
policies. 



University Curriculum 



Undergraduate Programs 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 

Accounting Major'' +♦ 

Trjck 

Financial Planning 
Business Administration Maior/Minor+''* 

Conceiitrtitions 

Finance 

International Business 

Management 

Marketing 

hilerdisciphnary Specialization 

Marketing — Mass Communication Interdisciplinary 
Specialization 

Tracks 

Economics 

Human Resource Management 

Legal Studies 

Double Major 

Business Administration and Computer Information Systems 
e-Business Major 

Track 

Financial Planning 

Double Major 

e-Business and Computer Information Systems 

e-Business and Business Administration (Marketing) 
Economics Major/Minor* 

Double Majors 

Economics and Geography 

Economics and Mathematics 

Economics and Political Science 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Art Education (K-12) Major* 

Dance Performance and Education (K-12) Major* 

(#audition required) 
Early Childhood Education Major* + 
Elementary Education Major' 

Minor 

Mathematics 
Integrated Elementary Education - Special Education Major 
Library Media Certification (K-12) 
Music Education (K-12) Major* (#audition required) 

Concentrations 

Instrumental* 

Vocal/General# 
Physical Education (K-12) Major * 
Secondary Education Major* 

Certification Areas 

Biology/General Science 

Chemistry 

Earth-Space Science 

English 

French 

Geography 

German 

History 

Mathematics 

Physics 

School Health 

Social Science 

Spanish 
Special Education Major* 

Tracks 

Elementary 

Infant/Primary 

Secondary/Adult 

COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS AND COMMUNICATION 

Art Major/Minor^ 
Concentrations 
Art History 
Crafts 

Industrial Design 
Painting 
Printmaking 
Sculpture 



Visual Communication 

Program Options 

Ceramics 

Metalsmithing and Jewelry 

Interdisciplinary Crafts 

Painting 

Computer Art 

Graphic Design 

Illustration: Studio Media/Digital 

Photography; Fine and Applied Arts 

Photography: Photographic Imaging 
Art Education (K-12) Major* 
Communication Studies Major/Minor 
Double Major 

Communication Studies and Political Science 
Dance Performance and Education (K-12) Major 

(#audition required) 
Electronic Media and Film Major/Minor 
Tracks 
Film 

Radio/Audio 
TelevisionA'ideo 
Film and Media Studies 
Mass Communication Major/Minor 
Tracks 
Advertising 

Journalism and New Media 

Strategic Public Relations and Integrated Communication 
Double Major 

Mass Communication and Political Science 
Interdisciplinary' Specialization 
Mass Communication — Marketing Interdisciplinary 

Specialization 
Music Major/Minor+* (#audition required) 
Concentrations 
Composition* 
Guitar Performance* 
Jazz/Commercial Music* 
Music Literature* 
Keyboard Performance* 
Voice Performance* 
Winds/Strings/Percussion Performance* 
Music Education (K-12) Major* (#audition required) 
Concentrations 
Instrumental* 
Vocal/General* 
Theatre Major/Minor 
Tracks 
Acting 

Design and Production 
General Theatre 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 

Athletic Training Ma]or+* 

Deaf Studies Major 

Exercise Science Major 

Health Care Management Major/Minor 

Track 

Long-Term Care 
Health Science Major+ 

Concentrations 

Community Health 

School and Community Health Education 

School Health — Teacher Education (5-12) 
Nursing Major*+ 

Basic Program 

RN Completion Program 
Occupational Therapy Major*-!- 
Physical Education Major (K-12) Certification 
Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Major** 

Double Major 

Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology and Deaf Studies 
Sport Management Major 
Sport Studies Major 

Track 

Sport and Humanities 

Concentration 

Psychology of Sport 



University Curriculum 



Community College Partnership 

Allied Health Major (with Community Colleges of Baltimore County) 

Chemical Dependency Counselmg and Education Major (with 

Community College of Baltimore County, Dundalk) 

Tracks 

Counseling and Rehabilitation 

Prevention and Education 
Pre-Professmnal Preparation 
Pre-Medical Technology 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Cultural Studies Ma|or/Mmor 
English Major/Minor-^ 

Concentrations 

Literature 

Writing 

Minors 

World Literature 

Creative Writing 
Environmental Science and Studies Major 

ConcentrationlMinor 

Environmental Studies 
Family Studies Major/Minor 

Tracks 

Child Life 

Family and Human Services 

Services to Children 
French Major/Minor/Proficiency 
Geography and Environmental Planning Major/Minor 

Minor 

Geographic Information Sciences 

Double Majors 

Geography and Economics 

Geography and Political Science 

Geography and Sociology 
Geography and Land Surveying Major (with Community College 

of Baltimore County, Catonsville) 
German Major/Minor/Proficiency 
Gerontology Major/Minor 
History Major/Minor-*- 
Interdisciplinary Studies Major 

Tracks/Minors/Options 

American Studies 

Asian Studies 

Classical Studies 

Individualized Studies 

Latin American Studies 

Tracks 

Animal Behavior 

Pre-Professiona! Preparation 

Prelaw 

Dual Degree Prelaw Program(with University of Baltimore) 

Minors Only 

African and African American Studies 

Business, Communication and the Liberal Arts 

Comparative Ethnic Studies 

Irish Studies 

Jewish Studies 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies 
International Studies Major/Minor 

Tracks 

General 

International Development 

Asia 

Latin America 

Europe 

Minor 

European Studies 
Law and American (Civilization Ma|or 
Metropolitan Studies Major 
Philosophy Major/Minor 
Political Science Major/Minor 

Double Ma/ors 

Political Science and Economics 

Political Science and Geography 

Political Science and Communication Studies 

Political Science and Mass Communication 
Psychology Major/Minor* 

Optiims 

Honors Clinical 

Honors Developmental 

Honors Research 



Religious Studies Major/Minor 
Social Science Maior 
Sociology-Anthropology Major/Minor-f 

Concentrations 

Anthropology 

Sociology 

Criminal Justice 

Double Major 

Sociology and Geography 
Spanish Major/Minor/Proficiency 
Women's Studies Major/Minor 

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 

Biology Maior/Minor 

Concentrations 

Cell and Molecular Biology 

Functional Biology of Animals 

Organismal Biology and Ecology 

Secondary School Biology and General Science Teaching 
Chemistry Major/Minor (ACS accredited degree)+ 

Track 

General Professional 
Computer Information Systems Major/Minor-^ 

Double Majors 

Computer Information Systems and Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems and Electronic Business 
Computer Science Major/Minor ■»■-♦ 

Track 

Computer Security 

Double Major 

Computer Science and Mathematics 
Earth-Space Science Major 
Environmental Science and Studies Major 

Concentration 

Environmental Science 

Minor 

Environmental Studies 
Forensic Chemistry Major 
Geology Major/Minor-*- 

Tracks 

General Geology 

Environmental Geology 
Mathematics Major/Minor-f 

Concentrations 

Actuarial Science and Risk Management 

Applied Mathematics 

Pure Mathematics 

Secondary Education 
Medicinal Chemistry Major (Dual Degree Program with 

University of Maryland, College Park) 
Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Bioinformatics Major/Minor 

Tracks 

Molecular Biology 

Biochemistry 

Bioinformatics 
Physics Major/Minor 

Tracks 

Astrophysics 

Applied Physics 

General Physics 

Minor 

Astronomy 
B.S. Physics/M.S. in Computer Science 
Community College Partnership 
Information Technology Major (with Community College of Baltimore 

County, Essex) 
Dual Degree Programs 
B.S. in Biological Sciences/M.S. in Aquaculture or Antarctic and Southern 

Ocean Studies (with University of Tasmania) 
Medicinal Chemistry (with llniversity of Maryland School of Pharmacy) 
Physics and Engineering (with University of Maryland, College Park and 

Pennsylvania State University) 
Pre-Professional Preparation 
Prepharmacy 
Prc-physical Therapy 
Preveterinary Medicine 

Concentrations, minors and tracks are listed under majors. 

"Screened or competitive major. Admission to the university does not 

guarantee admission to this major program. 

•fThis program is accredited by a national association. 

#Auditions arc required. 

■f This major can be completed 100 percent during the evening hours. 



University Curriculum 



OPPORTUNITIES FOR OFF-CAMPUS STUDY 

Students at Towson may expand their educational opportunities 
by studying in universities throughout Maryland, the United 
States, and in countries around the world. In some programs, stu- 
dents are able to pay tuition approximately equal to that at 
Towson (plus transportation), while others will require additional 
funds. Students considering one of the off-campus study options 
will want to plan ahead for their experience. 

Inter-Institutional/BSEP Registration Program 
Enrollment Services Center 235, 410-704-2007 
The Inter-Institutional Registration Program at Towson University 
is designed to foster an interchange of students between Towson 
and other University System of Maryland institutions. Certain pri- 
vate colleges, such as Goucher, Loyola, Johns Hopkins, College of 
Notre Dame and Morgan State University, also participate in a 
similar program called the Baltimore Student Exchange Program 
(BSEP), with no additional tuition costs to students. 

Interested students should contact the coordinator at Towson. 
Students must maintain a combined full load (12 or more units) 
with a minimum of 6 units at TU. With approval of the coordi- 
nator, students may register for one or rsvo courses at the host 
institution. Enrollment is on a space-available basis. Students 
must obtain special permits or instructor consent to register for 
courses that require them at the host institution. Students partici- 
pating in the Inter-Institutional Registration Program must follow 
the withdrawal deadlines at the host institutions. 

At the end of the term, the host institution's registrar will send 
an official transcript to Towson, and the courses completed and 
grades earned will be posted to the Towson record and calculated 
into the Towson cumulative average. Additionally, a notation will 
be made that the course work was completed through the pro- 
gram, indicating the name of the host institution. 

National Student Exchange (NSE) 
Lecture Hall, 410-704-3583 

This program allows full-time degree candidates an opportunity to 
become acquainted with social and educational patterns in other 
areas of the United States. Through Towson's membership in the 
NSE, students may attend one of the 140 participating schools for 
a term or a full year. Schools participating in the program include 
ones in Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, and in 47 states. 
For more information, contact Tracv Miller, 410-704-3583, or 
Susan Hyman, 4 1 0-704-2007. 

Consortia Agreements 

Enrollment Services Center 233, 410-704-3104 

Students at TU may participate in consortia agreements between 
accredited two- and four-year colleges and universities. Consortia 
agreements are useful for students who wish to use part of their 
financial aid to pay for all or part of the tuition and fees at the par- 
ticipating institution. 

Students wishing to participate in a consortia agreement must: 

1. Be in good academic standing at TU. Students for whom an 
exception to suspension, dismissal or disenrollment has been 
made or who have been readmitted on probation are 
ineligible; 

2. Not have completed more than 64 credits at community col- 
leges or more than 90 total units at all schools attended, 
including TU; 

3. Be enrolled for a minimum of 3 units at TU, and must have 
financial aid for the specific period; 

4. Obtain from the appropriate TU academic department(s) ver- 
ification that the courses selected are transferable in accor- 
dance with current transfer credit policies and procedures; 

5. Not attempt to repeat courses at the participating institution 
if thev have been attempted at TU with an earned grade of C, 
D+, D, F or FX. 



Note: Students do not need a consortia agreement if they register 
through either the Inter-Institutional Registration or Baltimore 
Student Exchange Programs (see section describing requirements). 

Students should also be aware that grades and units earned 
through a consortia agreement are posted to the TU record and 
calculated in the academic totals. Accordingly, the Academic 
Standards Committee reserves the right of approval in some cases 
if the Pass grading option is elected on courses taken as part of a 
consortia agreement. 

For more information, contact Marilyn Leuthold, Office of the 
Registrar, 410-704-3104. 

STUDY ABROAD 

Administration Building 

7720 York Road, Second Hoor, 410-704-2451 

Fax: 410-704-4703 

E-mail: studyabroad@towson.edu 

www.towson.edu/studyabroad 

Adam Grotsky, Director 

Tina Cavaluzzi, Assistant Director 

Liz Shearer, Adviser 

Claudia Jenkins. Programs Assistant 

The Study Abroad Office provides a wide range of overseas aca- 
demic experiences for Towson students. It plays an important role 
in the university's mission to internationalize the campus commu- 
nity and to provide all of its students with a broad knowledge and 
understanding of the global society. Currently, more than 300 stu- 
dents per year from a variety of disciplines participate in TU's 
study abroad and exchange programs. 

The Study Abroad Office provides the following services: coor- 
dinates and manages study abroad and exchange programs; advis- 
es interested and eligible students on incorporating an overseas 
experience in their undergraduate degree program; acts as a liaison 
for the student, academic departments and various administrative 
offices on campus, and foreign universities; and provides support 
services to students prior to, during, and following a study abroad 
experience. 

The university maintains relationships with various institutions 
abroad and U.S. -based organizations providing overseas study 
opportunities in Europe, the Americas, Africa, Asia, Mexico, the 
Caribbean, New Zealand, Canada and Australia. For an up-to- 
date list of exchange partners and affiliates, please visit the 
Web site at ww^v.towson.edu/studyabroad. 

The length of programs varies from one term to a year, 
Minimester or during the summer. Many programs focus on spe- 
cific academic disciplines, while others emphasize language study, 
independent study or an internship combined with traditional 
course work. Academic credit can be applied toward fulfilling 
requirements and electives for degree programs. 

Financial aid and scholarships may be applied toward all study 
abroad exchanges and programs. Special scholarships for study 
abroad are also available. Contact the Study Abroad Office for 
more information. 

Weekly information sessions are conduaed by the Study Abroad 
Office to provide students with preliminary information about 
overseas study opportunities and procedures. Call the office at 
410-704-2451, or visit our Web site for the current schedule of ses- 
sions. Students should attend an information session approximately 
one year prior to their intended study abroad experience. Study 
abroad advisers are available by appointment to meet with stu- 
dents who have attended a preliminary information session. 
During an advising appointment, students can expect to receive 
information and advice on study abroad program options and how 
to choose an appropriate program, as well as financial aid and 
scholarship information, specific course information, transferring 
credit, registration, housing, etc. Students are also advised on how 
to obtain passports, visas and other necessary travel documents. 



University Curriculum 



Pre-departure orientation sessions are conducted each term for stu- 
dents who have been accepted to a study abroad program. 
Students are required to attend these informative sessions which 
address many critical issues such as heahh, safety, travel and cul- 
ture shock. The office maintains a resource area for students with 
program/course catalogs, videos, scholarship and financial aid 
resources, travel guides, and miscellaneous international publica- 
tions. 

For further information, contact a study abroad adviser at 4 10- 
704-2451, or visit the office to pick up an information packet. 

NON-TRADITIONAL UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAMS 

Registrar's Customer Service Center, Enrollment Services 223, 

410-704-2471 

The Office for Non-Traditional Undergraduate Programs oversees 

the following programs and services: Non-Degree Student 

Enrollment, Teacher Cenification, Second Bachelor's Degree, 

College in Escrow, Golden l.D. (senior citizen tuition waiver), and 

Credit for Prior Learning. 

The academic policies described in the Admissions, University 
Curriculum, and Academic Regulations sections of this catalog 
apply to students in the above programs unless otherwise specified. 

Admission 

Admission is the official acceptance of a student as a degree candi- 
date by the TU Office of Admissions or the Second Bachelor's 
Degree Office. Registration is the enrollment in courses for a par- 
ticular term. Persons who meet the criteria for non-degree enroll- 
ment (outlined below) may register for courses without formal 
admission to the university. Eligibility requirements for formal 
admission and deadlines are detailed in the Admissions section of 
this catalog. 

Non-Degree Students 

Students who wish to enroll as non-degree students (not formally 
admitted by the university) must complete and submit an 
Enrollment Form to the Office for Non-Traditional Undergraduate 
Programs before registering. Persons who have been denied admis- 
sion to TU because of academic ineligibilit)' are not permitted to 
attend as non-degree students. They may, however, transfer to 
Towson Universin.' after attending another college or university if 
they meet TU's transfer admission requirements (see Guidelines for 
Transfer Admission in this catalog). Persons who have graduated 
from high school within the last two years are not eligible to attend 
TU as a non-degree student during the fall or spring terms. They 
must formally apply for admission through the Office of 
Admissions. 

Non-degree students are expected to maintain the following 
cumulative GPA based on calculable grades at Towson University 
as indicated below: 



Units 

(includes Towson units only) 

9-29.5 

30-59.5 

60 and above 



Minimum GPA 
1.50 

1.75 
2.00 



Students who fail to meet the criteria for good academic standing 
outlined above will be sent letters of warning. After being warned, 
if students do not maintain good academic standing in any subse- 
quent term, their enrollment will be permanently discontinued. 

Non-degree students may apply for formal admission as degree 
candidates according to published deadlines, and admission will be 
based on a competitive GPA and space availability. Advising is 
available through the Office for Non-Traditional Undergraduate 
Programs, the Academic Advising Center, and the Office of 
Admissions. 



The following policies apply for non-degree students who wish 
to earn a degree at TU: 

1. No catalog will be assigned until you are formally admitted as 
a degree candidate. You must complete the requirements listed 
in your assigned catalog. Please note: It is to your benefit to 
be formally admitted as soon as you are eligible. 

2. You must complete the final 30 units of your degree in resi- 
dence at TTJ. 

3. You must complete the final 15 units of your degree at TU as 
a degree candidate. 

4. Transfer credits earned at another institution will not be eval- 
uated until you are formally admitted as a degree candidate. 
Academic advising received prior to formal admission will not 
be considered binding by Towson University. 

International students who are on a visa of any type may not 
enroll as non-degree students without written permission from the 
International Student and Scholar Office. Non-native English 
speakers will be tested in English and placed in remedial English 
courses if needed. 

Teacher Certification 

Students who already hold a baccalaureate degree and wish to take 
courses (including student teaching) to become certified to teach in 
the state of Maryland should contact the Center for Professional 
Practice, located in Hawkins Hall, room 302B, 410-704-2567. 
Students must complete a Teacher Certification Enrollment Form 
in order to register. The form is available in the Center for 
Professional Practice and should be submitted to the Office of 
Non-Traditional Undergraduate Programs. Cenification students 
will be advised by the appropriate department in the College of 
Education. 

Students taking courses for recertification do not need to file an 
application with the Center for Professional Practice. They only 
need to file the Non-Degree Enrollment Form with the Office of 
Non-Traditional Undergraduate Programs (see section above on 
Non-Degree Students). 

Non-Degree Immunization 

All non-degree students enrolled in 6 or more units will be required 
to submit immunization records. For more information, contact 
the Dowell Health Center at 410-704-2466. 

Second Bachelor's Degree 

The Second Bachelor's Degree Program is designed to meet the 
needs of college graduates who wish to attain proficiency in a dif- 
ferent major field. To be eligible for admission, applicants must 
hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution 
and must have a 2.00 cumulative GPA from all previously attend- 
ed institutions. 

A maximum of 90 transferable credits of undergraduate course 
work will be applied toward the second bachelor's degree. In addi- 
tion, students must complete a minimum of 30 units in residence at 
TU and meet all the requirements of the "new" major. At least 
one-half of the "new" major units must be completed at Towson 
since the completion of the first degree. Each student must com- 
plete an advanced writing course. All other General Education 
requirements are considered to have been met through the first 
degree. 

For more information or to apply, visit our Web site: 
http://onestop.towson.edu/2nd-bachelors. Deadlines for fall and 
spring admission are June 15 and November 15, respectively. 
Some screened/competitive majors have earlier deadlines and sepa- 
rate applications. 

Second bachelor's degree candidates may qualify for departmen- 
tal honors, the Dean's List, and/or graduation with honors (60 
units at Til in the second degree required). Please refer to the 
Academic Regulations section of this catalog for criteria. 



University Curriculum 



College in Escrow 

The College in Escrow Program is designed for high school stu- 
dents who want to take courses at Towson for college credit. 
Students must have a B average and approximatelv 1100 on SATs 
(or llOonPSATs). 

The program allows students to: 

• Experience college first-hand. 

• Take courses not offered at the high school level. 

• Earn college credit. 

College in Escrow students enroll in regular courses at Towson 
during the summer sessions or the fall and spring terms and attend 
class right along with other college students. They may take any 
TU course, provided the prerequisites have been met. 

Golden I.D. Program: Senior Citizens 

Retired Maryland residents. 60 years of age or older, are eligible 
for the Golden I.D. senior citizen tuition waiver program. Golden 
I.D. students may enroll for up to 11 units in the fall and spring 
terms (and 8 units in the summer session) and pay a discounted fee 
rate. Participants may take courses for audit or credit on a space- 
available basis (special format courses and CEP programs are 
excluded). To apply for a Golden I.D. card and find out the current 
fee rates, stop by the Office of Non-Traditional Undergraduate 
Programs. 

Credit for Prior Learning 

TU recognizes that some students may have acquired abilities 
through life experience, personal study, and/or military course 
work. The Credit for Prior Learning (CPL) Program offers an 
opportunity for students to receive college credit by taking "chal- 
lenge" tests in the area of their proficiency, presenting portfolios, 
and providing documentation of military course work/experiences. 

A maximum of 45 units for "non-traditional learning" may be 
granted with a grade of PE through the Credit for Prior Learning 
Program (this includes any CLEP credit granted in transfer). CPL 
units can be used to fulfill GenEds, electives, and/or major require- 
ments. Students must be degree candidates with at least a 2.00 
cumulative GP.\ to have CPL units recorded on the TU transcript. 
Please note that some academic departments may accept a lower 
maximum number of CPL units toward the ma]or. Please check 
with the major department first to find out if such restrictions 
exist. 

Different ways to earn CPL units at Towson University are 
described below: 

Departmental Exams 

TU offers departmental "challenge" exams in Biology, Chemistry, 
Economics, Health Science, Mathematics, Modern Languages and 
Psychology. Students' achievement in a particular test must be 
equal or superior to that of students having earned a grade equiv- 
alent of 2.00. Although departmental standards for granting cred- 
it may exceed this minimum, credit may not be granted when 
achievement is below 2.00 level work. Departments may also offer 
advanced placement with no credit given based on an individual- 
ized assessment. 

CLEP (College Level Examination Program) 

TL) offers, and grants units for, the following computerized CLEP 
tests: Humanities, Mathematics, Natural Science, and Social 
Science/History. Tests are also offered in Accounting (ACCT 201, 
202), Business Law (LEGL 226), Economics (ECON 201, 202), 
Marketing (MKTG 341), iVIanagement (MNGT 361), Computer 
Science (COSC 111), Freshman Composition (ENGL 102), 
American Literature (ENGL 230), English Literature (ENGL 221, 
222), Educational Psychology (PSYC 201), and Sociology (SOCI 
101). For information about the minimum passing scores for CLEP 
tests, call 410-704-2471. 



Individualized Assessments 

Students who wish to earn credit for courses which do not have 
standard departmental or CLEP exams may contact the academic 
department to determine if individualized assessment is possible. 
This type of assessment may include portfolio review, oral or writ- 
ten examination, demonstration (e.g., dance or music), or written 
report/paper. 

Military Course Work/Experience 

TU is a member of Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC). 
Students who have served or are currently serving in the United 
States military may receive college credit for basic training, military 
occupational specialties, and other military course work. Official 
documentation must be submitted. Work will be evaluated per the 
Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed 
Services by the American Council on Education (ACE). 

For further information on the Credit for Prior Learning Program, 
call the Office of Non-Traditional Undergraduate Programs, 410- 
704-2471. 

MILITARY SCIENCE PROGRAMS 

Towson offers students who are interested in officer training for 
the military several opportunities to pursue that training. 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) Credit 

TU will accept transfer credit hours earned from a recognized 
ROTC Program sponsored by an accredited college or university. 
Such credits will be considered upper- or lower-level credits as 
defined by the transferring school, and are applicable as elective 
units toward a TU degree. ROTC units are considered to be non- 
traditional units and are part of a maximum of 45 non-traditional 
units allowed by academic policy. 

U.S. Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) 

Towson University offers Army ROTC to its students through a 
cooperative agreement among Loyola College, TU, and the U.S. 
Army. 

The primary objective of the ROTC Program is to prepare 
selected students with potential to serve as commissioned officers 
in one of the three components of the U.S. Army — Active Army, 
National Guard and Army Reserve. The program is totally volun- 
tary and is conducted in two phases — the basic course and the 
advanced course. 

The basic course is taken in the freshman and sophomore years. 
No military commitment is incurred during this time, and students 
may withdraw, as with any other course, through the end of the 
second year The basic course is available as an elective to all qual- 
ified students. 

TU students who decide after either their freshman or sopho- 
more years that they are interested in the ROTC Program may 
attend a special ROTC Basic Camp. This camp will fully substi- 
tute for the first two years of on-campus study. This camp is held 
for six weeks during the summer, and all participants receive pay 
and allowances. 

Normally, students must have a minimum of two years of col- 
lege remaining before graduation in order to join ROTC. 
However, on a case-by-case basis, students who will commit them- 
selves to attending graduate school in order to meet the two- year 
requirement may be permitted to enroll. 

Except for veterans, the basic course or a basic camp must be 
successfully completed prior to entering the advanced course. 

The advanced course is normally taken in the final two years of 
college. A paid, six-week advanced camp is held during the sum- 
mer between the junior and senior years. 

Army ROTC graduates may serve three or four years, or an 
entire career on active duty, or request Reserve Forces Duty (RED) 



University Curriculum 



and serve as little duty as three months on active duty. The remain- 
der of their obligation is spent in the Army Reserve or the Army 
National Guard where they assume roles equally important to 
those of their active duty counterparts. 

Specialized branch assignments are made in the students' senior 
year which will determine the nature of their duties once they are 
commissioned. These specialized assignments are based largely 
upon students" majors and personal preferences. 

Prior to graduation and commissioning, the senior student will 
make known personal preferences regarding the geographical area 
of the world in which he or she desires to serve his or her first tour 
upon entering the active Army. 

The Army awards scholarships on a competitive basis to out- 
standing young men and women who are interested in serving in 
the active or reserve components of the U.S. Army. Details of the 
ROTC scholarship program are available from the Office of 
Financial Aid. All TU students are eligible to apply. 

Enrollment for ROTC is done through the Military Science 
Deparment at Loyola College. Contact the Military Science 
Department at 410-617-2387 or 410-617-2276 for class days and 
times. Generally, freshmen and sophomores have classes on 
Monday and Wednesday afternoons at Towson. Juniors and sen- 
iors attend classes at Loyola on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. 

Air Force ROTC 

Air Force ROTC is available to students at Towson University 
through an agreement with the University of Maryland, College 
Park. Air Force courses are scheduled so that students from 
Towson University may complete most AFROTC requirements 
during one morning per week at the College Park campus. In addi- 
tion, students at Towson are eligible to compete for all AFROTC 
scholarships; 4-, 3-, and 2-year scholarships pay for total tuition 
and fees at both the University of Maryland and Towson 
University, for all required books, and provide a $100 per month 
subsidy for both pilot and navigator training programs. Upon grad- 
uation from Towson University and completion of the AFROTC 
curriculum at the University of Maryland, students will be com- 
missioned second lieutenants in the Air Force. Students who are 
interested in the Air Force ROTC can contact: Air Force ROTC, 
Det. 330, Cole Field House, Room 2126, University 
of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742; telephone: 
301-314-3242/7649/7644. 



Academic Regulations 

An education from Towson University includes a broad liberal arts 
base and a strong knowledge of one or more major fields of study. 
To ensure that the Towson degree continues to have weight and 
meanmg, and that it signifies student work meeting or exceeding a 
particular level of excellence, the university insists that certain stan- 
dards and policies apply to all undergraduate students. These poli- 
cies are published every year in this catalog, and any revisions are 
effective as of the date of the catalog's publication (unless otherwise 
stated). 

The Academic Standards Committee, comprising faculty, admin- 
istrators and students, meets regularly to formulate policy and to 
review appeals from students asking for exceptions to policies. 

Students who wish an exception must appeal in writing to the 
Academic Standards Committee, c/o the Registrar's Office. Appeals 
must be written by students. Letters received from third parties will 
be considered only as support of students' appeals. Letters of 
appeal should be as brief as possible, concise, and must include all 
pertinent academic information, including, when appropriate, sup- 
porting documentation. All appeals receive a written response from 
the committee. 

This section will explain the policies and regulations that govern 
academic standards at Towson. 

DEFINITIONS OF TERMS 

A unit is the value given generally to one 50-minute class (or its 
equivalent) meeting weekly for a term. This means that a class 
meeting Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 9 to 9:50 a.m. or 
Tuesday and Thursday from 8 to 9:15 a.m. will be a 3-unit course. 
Most classes fit this format. Classes that require laboratory or stu- 
dio time in addition to lecture time will usually merit an extra cred- 
it, becoming 4-unit courses, just as those requiring less class time 
will merit fewer units. The course description section of the catalog 
lists the number of units each course carries. Faculty expect stu- 
dents to spend at least two hours reading, writing and doing 
research outside of class for each hour spent in class. 

A term is 14 weeks of instruction, exclusive of final examinations. 
The work covered in one college term is approximately equal to 
that done in one year of high school. 

Term of Study. Each term in which students register and do not 
cancel or withdraw during the change of schedule period counts as 
a term of study. 

Minimester is an intensive condensed term in January that allows 
students to take courses that lend themselves to a highly focused 
format (15 hours of instruction each week) to discuss ideas that 
interest students or that may fill a gap in their requirements. 
Students may take a maximum of 6 units in this term. 

The Summer Sessions are made up of four sessions of varying 
lengths, including an evening session, that allow students to com- 
plete regular course work in a shorter period of time and fulfill 
degree requirements sooner. Students may take a maximum of 9 
units in any one session and a maximum of 15 units in all sessions 
combined. 

Unit Load. In a regular fall or spring term students take about 15 
units (five, 3-unit courses). In the Minimester, students may take a 
maximum of 6 units. Students may register for a maximum of 15 
units during the summer, but they may nor take more than 9 units 
during any one session. 

To be considered full-time, undergraduate students must be 
enrolled in a minimum of 12 units each term. For graduate stu- 
dents, the minimum is 9 units each regular term. 



Academic Regulations 



Excessive Unit Loads. Degree candidates (formally admitted stu- 
dents) who have a 2.00 cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) will 
be able to register for 1 9 units in a term, and students who have at 
least a 3.25 cumulative GPA based on at least 30 units taken at 
Towson are eligible to carry up to 20 units. Seniors in their last 
term who have at least a 2.50 cumulative GPA and need 20 units 
to graduate will be able to take that number. Students whose cumu- 
lative GPA is 3.50 or higher based on 30 units toward GPA are eli- 
gible to take 21 units. 

Degree candidates who do not meet the criteria above but wish 
to carry over 19 units must obtain permission from the Registrar's 
Office before registering for the excess. 

Prerequisites. Prerequisites are requirements imposed by an aca- 
demic department for certain courses within its curriculum. Such 
requirements may include, but are not limited to, other courses, a 
specific GPA, or class standing, (e.g., junior, senior). Prerequisites 
may also include successful completion of screened requirements, 
where applicable, or successful completion of a specific test or 
examination, either departmental or standardized, where applica- 
ble. Prerequisites may also mclude department or instructor per- 
mission in addition to, or in lieu of, a specific course, testing, or 
class standing requirements. 

Departments are responsible for enforcing prerequisites. 
Students are advised to read carefully course descriptions found in 
the Undergraduate Catalog and to make sure they have met any 
prerequisites before registering for courses. Students who remain 
in courses without having met prerequisites, with or without the 
permission of the instructor, do so at their own risk. Failure to meet 
prerequisites and withdraw from a course by the published dead- 
line is not a basis for petitioning the Academic Standards 
Committee for an exception to academic policy. 

ENROLLMENT AND REGISTRATION 

Students who have applied for admission to degree candidacy and 
have been admitted must return their Enrollment Contract to 
acknowledge their acceptance of the university's offer of admission. 
After they do this, they will receive information about academic 
advising and course registration. Orientation is available to new 
freshmen and transfer students prior to the beginnmg of the term. 
The process in which students select courses and have those cours- 
es entered into the computer is called registration. 

Each term students receive information regarding the number of 
units they have earned to establish their registration date. Students 
are encouraged to see their adviser before they register. Students 
who have no adviser may check with their major department oi; if 
thev have no major, with the Academic Advising Center (Lecture 
Hail, 410-704-2472). 

After students have met with their advisers, they plan their 
schedules and register online at http://students.towson.edu. 
Students may also register in person at the Registrar's Customer 
Service Center, Enrollment Services, room 223. First-year students 
must meet with an adviser before they will be allowed to register. 
Non-degree students (those not formally admitted to the university) 
are encouraged to seek advising at least once each academic year. 

Imponant. Students may not attend a class until they register for 
that class, and they must satisfy all financial obligations to the insti- 
tution before they register. 



Special Format Courses 

Directed readings and independent studies are examples of special 
format courses. Students may not apply more than 12 units of spe- 
cial format courses toward graduation. Departments may set limits 
for fewer units, but they may not exceed the maximum of 12 units 
set by the University Curriculum Committee. Because of the con- 
centrated nature of these courses, students are advised to take no 
more than 6 units of upper-level special format courses per term. 

Pass Grading Option 

Students may elect to be graded on a Pass basis for a maximum of 
12 units toward their degree. If students register for more than 12 
units under the Pass option, only 12 will apply toward graduation. 
This option is not available for courses required toward a major, 
minor, or for certification in teacher education unless special per- 
mission is obtained from the department chairperson. Students 
must make all changes to the option before the published 
withdrawal deadline each term. In order to elect this grading 
option, students must complete a Change of Schedule Form in the 
Registrar's Customer Service Center, Enrollment Services, room 223. 
Students electing this option must earn a grade equivalent of 
2.00 (C) or higher in order to receive the Pass (PS) grade, which is 
not calculated in the average. Students who earn below the grade 
equivalent of 2.00 (C-) will earn that grade, which will be calculat- 
ed. Refer to Grades/Grading for more information. 

Auditing Courses 

Students may audit a course with the permission of the instructor. 
An audited course will be graded AU and will not apply toward the 
degree. Students may elect the audit option at any point up to the 
withdrawal deadline by presentmg a completed Change of 
Schedule Form with the instructor's signature to the Registrar's 
Customer Service Center, Enrollment Services, room 223. If stu- 
dents then choose not to elect this option, they must follow the 
same procedure, including obtaining the instructor's signature, to 
remove the option up to the withdrawal deadline. 
Students are advised that audited courses: 

• do not count as part of the term's unit load 

• do not count as part of the term or cumulative totals 

• do not apply toward graduation unless repeated later for credit 

• will be graded AU 

• will be graded AUX if the student registers for a course as an 
audit and fails to attend 

• may not be used to repeat a course for which credit has 
already been earned 

• are billed at the same rate as unit courses 

CHANGING A SCHEDULE 

All changes in students' schedules of classes (adding or dropping a 
course or change in sections, units or grading option) are valid only 
if students complete a Change of Schedule Form and file it with the 
Registrar's Office. Students who do not complete the Change 
Form and turn it in by the deadline (available online at 
http://students.towson.edu) will not receive credit for classes 
attended but not formally added. A grade of F or FX will be record- 
ed in courses not formally dropped. 

Information on making schedule changes is online at 
http://students.towson.edu. 

Adding a Class. Students may add classes to their schedules during 
the first week of classes using a Change of Schedule Form (avail- 
able in departmental offices or from the Registrar's Office). Because 
each department has different procedures for adding classes (some 
require faculty signature and departmental stamp; others only a 
stamp), students need to check the procedures each term online at 
http://students.towson.edu. 



Academic Regulations 



Students may not enter a class after the change of schedule peri- 
od (first week of classes) ends. Exceptions are considered only with 
written authorization from the instructor and department chair. 

Dropping a Class. Students may drop a class up to the deadline 
available online at http://students.towson.edu. 

• If they drop during the change of schedule period (the first week 
of classes), no grade is recorded. 

• If they drop courses after the change of schedule period but 
within the withdrawal period, a grade of W is recorded on the 
transcript. There is no academic penalty associated with 
theW. 

Students who do not officially drop courses during the estab- 
lished time periods receive grades in the courses (A to F or FX) as 
determmed by the instructors. 

Withdrawal after the deadline. Students with documented medical 
problems or verified circumstances beyond their control may 
request to withdraw from one or more courses without academic 
penalty after the established deadline. Documentation must 
accompany the request. If the request is approved, a grade of W 
will be recorded. Requests must be submitted prior to the begin- 
ning of final examinations. 

Sometimes new students who have not yet begun classes decide 
not to attend (cancellation), or continuing students need to with- 
draw completely from the university (withdrawal). 

A. Cancellation of Enrollment. Newly admitted undergraduate 
students who decide not to attend the university before or 
during the first week of classes of the term for which admis- 
sion was approved must notify the Office of Admissions in 
writing. Their admission file will be canceled accordingly, 
and they will be required to submit an additional application 
for any future entrance date. 

B. Selective (Course) Withdrawals. Students may request selec- 
tive withdrawals (while maintaining enrollment in other 
courses) after the withdrawal deadline by coming to the 
Registrar's Customer Service Center, Enrollment Services, 
room 223. All such requests, accompanied by appropriate 
documentation, must be received prior to the beginning of 
final examinations. Those received after this point must be 
appealed to the Academic Standards Committee. Appeals for 
retroactive selective withdrawals (i.e., received after final 
examinations begin) are rarely granted. For information on 
complete retroactive withdrawals, refer to item C below. 

C. Complete (University) Withdrawals. Complete withdrawals 
are more likely to be given consideration. Appropriate med- 
ical documentation must accompany all requests. Degree can- 
didates who wish to withdraw from the university should 
obtain an Official Withdrawal Form from the Registrar's 
Customer Service Center, Enrollment Services, room 223, 
complete the necessary information, and submit it to that 
office. If a term is in progress, students who withdraw after 
the last date to drop a course with a grade of W will earn the 
grade of F or FX unless the withdrawal is for medical reasons 
or other extenuating circumstances. 
D. Re-enrollment. Previous degree candidates who have missed 
more than one term must apply for readmission through the 
Registrar's Office. Forms are available in the Registrar's 
Customer Service Center, Enrollment Services, room 223. The 
deadlines for readmission arc August 1 for the fall term and 
December 1 for the spring term. 
Readmitted students must comply with the CenEds that were 
published in the Undergraduate Catalog at the time they were orig- 
inally admitted to Towson. 

Students who withdraw from the university, enroll elsewhere, 
and return to Towson after having completed transfer course work 
cannot qualify for a transfer package ( 1 996 and later catalogs). 
This option is available only upon initial admission. (Refer to the 
Admissions section of this catalog.) 



Students who officially withdraw must comply with the compe- 
tency standards (required developmental courses) in effect at the 
time of readmission if the standards were not met prior to with- 
drawal. 

CLASS STANDING 

Students are classified according to the number of units earned: 

Freshman 0-29.5 units 

Sophomore 30-59.5 units 

Junior 60-89.5 units 

Senior 90 units and above 

CLASS ATTENDANCE/ABSENCE POLICY 

L Students are expected to attend all classes. Consistent atten- 
dance offers the most effective opportunity for students to under- 
stand concepts, materials and expectations of those courses in 
which they are enrolled. Although some courses do not use atten- 
dance as a criterion for grading, there are others where in-class par- 
ticipation is an integral part of the course. Examples include, but 
are not limited to, seminars and courses that require public speak- 
ing, laboratories, language learning, group discussions or student 
teaching. Frequent absences from these types of courses, whether 
excused or unexcused, may affect the final grade. 

Faculty who use absences as a factor in grading must explain in 
the course syllabus what effect even an excused absence might have 
on the evaluation of a student's work. 

2. It is policy of the university to excuse the absences of students 
for the following reasons: 

• illness or injury when the student is unable to attend class 

• religious observance where the nature of the observance pre- 
vents the student from attending class 

• participation in university activities at the request of universi- 
ty authorities (e.g.. Intercollegiate Athletics, Forensics Team, 
Dance Company, etc.) 

• compelling verifiable circumstances beyond the control of the 
student. 

Students requesting an excused absence must provide documen- 
tation to the instructor two weeks prior to the scheduled absence 
when known in advance or as soon as possible when not known in 
advance. 

3. Absences that do not fall into any of the categories outlined in 
item number two are unexcused. Faculty may set a limit on the 
number of unexcused absences. 

4. Students who are absent from class are responsible for any 
missed work, assignments, or assessments (e.g., quizzes, tests, 
papers, etc.). Faculty members are required to allow students with 
documented excused absences to make up missed work or assign- 
ments when this is feasible. When the nature of the assignment 
makes this impossible, faculty members should attempt to make a 
reasonable adjustment of the assignment. 

Students who will be representing TU at events, conferences, or 
other official activities should obtain a Notification of Absence 
from Class Form from the Office of Student Activities, University 
Union, room 217, to be given to their instructors to verify the 
excused absence. Students are encouraged to notif>' faculty of antic- 
ipated class absences as soon as they learn they will be missing 
class. Faculty should use their discretion regarding making up 
missed assignments and the ramifications of missing certain class 
periods. 

Important! Students who fail to appear for the first two class 
sessions, or the first session of evening classes, may forfeit their 
space in class. Instructors have the right to release these spaces to 
other students wishing to add the class to their schedules. Students 
who lose their spaces MUST OFFICIALLY WITHDRAW FROM 
THE COURSE THR0U(;H THE REGISTRARS OFFICE TO 
AVOID EARNINC; AN EX GRADE FOR NON-ATTENDANCE. 
See the sections on Changing a Schedule and Grades/Grading for 
further information. 



Academic Regulations 



GRADES/GRADING 

The Plus/Minus Grading System (4.00 scale, term system), imple- 
mented in fall 1998, applies to all undergraduate students and can- 
not be applied retroactively to grades earned or recorded, including 
incomplete (I) grades or contested grades, before fall 1998. 

Grade Points 
Grade Per Unit 

A 4.00 

A- 3.67 

B+ 333 

B 3.00 

B- 2.67 

C+ 2.33 

C 2.00 

C- 1.67 

D+ 1.33 

D 1.00 

F 0.00 

FX 0.00 

Grade Point Averages 

The Grade Point Average (GPA) is computed as follows: First, mul- 
tiply the units for each course taken in a term by the grade points 
(values above) assigned to the grade earned. Second, total the units 
and grade points for the term. Third, divide the total number of 
grade points by the total number of units to find the Grade Point 
Average (GPA) for the term. 

The grades of S and U (satisfactory and unsatisfactory) are used 
primarily m those courses offered for development and selected 
courses that have been recommended by the academic departments 
and approved by the Academic Standards and University 
Curriculum committees. The grade of S denotes that work of 2.00 
level or higher has been completed and that students have attained 
a level of competence sufficient to advance to the next course. A 
grade of U is given to students whose work is below 2.00 level 
quality. S and U grades are not calculated in students' GPAs. 

The grade of PS (Pass) is assigned to a course selected on the Pass 
grading option when students earn a C grade or higher. Students 
who elect the Pass grading option and earn a grade of C- or below 
will have that grade recorded on the permanent record and used in 
calculation of the GPA. 

The grade of PE is assigned to those courses passed under the 
Credit for Prior Experience/Learning option. All grades are record- 
ed on students' permanent records, but are not calculated in stu- 
dents" GPAs. 

The grade of FX is calculated in students' GPAs. A grade of FX 
is given to students who never attend class or who stop attending 
during the term without officially withdrawing. (If students have 
officially withdrawn, a grade of W will appear on the final class 
roster.) A grade of FX is given to students who stop attending 
before they have completed more than half of the course work. 
Students who attend most classes but miss the final examination 
without a legitimate excuse, will receive a zero or F grade for the 
final examination and have that value or grade calculated with 
other grades earned during the term to determine the final grade. 

The grade of W is administrative, nonpunitive, and is not calcu- 
lated in students' GPAs. A grade of W is given to students who 
officially withdraw from a course by the published withdrawal 
deadline each term. It is also given to students who obtain author- 
ization from the Academic Standards Committee to withdraw from 
a course or courses after the deadline. Such withdrawals must be 
based on documented medical difficulties or verifiable circum- 
stances beyond students' control. 

Tlie grade of I is given to students by their instructors when ver- 
ifiable circumstances prevent students from completing a course 
within the term. The I grade should be given only in cases where 
students have completed most of the term and have a reasonable 



expectation of successfully completing the work required. It 
should not be given at a point earlier in the term when a with- 
drawal is appropriate. For more information on the Incomplete 
grade, see the section immediately following. 

Changing Grades and Changing Incompletes 

Incompletes may be granted toward the end of the term and only 
for verifiable medical reasons or for documented circumstances 
beyond the control of the student. Earlier in the term, a withdraw- 
al may be more appropriate. The grade of I automatically becomes 
a grade of F ISO days from the end of the term following the grant- 
ing of an I unless changed to another letter grade. 

The grade of I may be extended by the instructor for a period not 
to e.xceed an additional regular term if the conditions for granting 
the original Incomplete still verifiably exist. To grant this exten- 
sion, the Change of Grade/Incomplete Form must be used. 

Although not part of the formal Incomplete grading option, as 
approved by the Academic Standards Committee, Incomplete 
Grade Agreement Forms may be used by faculty to establish a spe- 
cific time by which students must complete the work for a partic- 
ular course. This form may be used to supplement the issuance of 
the Incomplete grade on the Final Grade Roster It allows faculty 
to designate a time prior to the end of the following term of study 
for the course work to be completed. These forms are available 
from each department's administrative assistant and are to be 
retained by the faculty member with a copy being issued to the stu- 
dent. Faculty members using the Incomplete Grade Agreement 
Form should also note on the Final Grade Roster the actual date 
by which the work is due (e.g., work due on July 1). 

It is the student's responsibility to complete the work required 
before 180 days has elapsed in order for the Incomplete to be con- 
verted to a regular grade. Students do not repeat the course in 
which the Incomplete was given. Instructors may specify an earli- 
er time by which the work required is due in order to remove the 
Incomplete. .\n Incomplete grade that is not resolved by the end 
of the next full term of study, excluding summer and Minimester 
sessions, is converted to an F grade and is calculated in students' 
GPAs. 

Grade changes, excluding I grades and repeated courses, must 
be submitted by the faculty member within one year. After one 
year, requests for grade changes may be made only for verifiable 
medical reasons and by petition to the Academic Standards 
Committee. 

Graduating seniors must resolve any outstanding Incomplete 
grades within 180 days following graduation. Specific dates for 
each graduating class are included in the correspondence from the 
Graduation Office. 

Unsuccessful Term/ Academic Clemency. The following guidelines 
determine approval of the declaration of an Unsuccessful Term: 

• Five full academic years must have elapsed since the term in 
question and graduation has not occurred. 

• Students must have completed at least 24 units of 2.00 level 
work at Towson University since the term in question. 

• Only one Unsuccessful Term can be granted in a student's aca- 
demic career. 

Disagreements Related to Grading. Students who feel an earned 
grade is unjust must address their disagreements first to their 
instructor, who is primarily responsible for assigning grades. If the 
matter is not satisfactorily resolved through this approach and the 
issue warrants further consideration, students may then direct an 
appeal through the following channels: department chair/program 
coordinator, college dean. Division for Student Affairs. 



Academic Regulations 



REPEATING COURSES 

When courses are repeated, students will receive credit for the 
course only once. Only the higher of the two grades will be calcu- 
lated in the GPA. The lower grade will remain on the record with 
the letter R preceding (e.g., RF, RX, RD, etc.) to indicate the course 
has been repeated. 

Effective fall 2003, the lower grade will remain on the record 
with a repeat included or excluded message, whichever is appropriate. 

Students may not make a third attempt of a course except with 
prior approval. Students must complete a Petition for a Third 
Attempt Form and submit it to the Registrar's Customer Service 
Center, Enrollment Services, room 223, before registering for the 
course. Grades of W are administrative and are not considered as 
part of the repeated course procedure. Courses that have been 
accepted previously for transfer credit by TU or have been 
attempted or completed for units at TU may not be repeated at 
other insttutions. 

Courses in which low or failing grades were earned at Towson 
MUST be repeated at Towson in order for the record to be adjusted 
and the GPA to be recalculated. 



2. Academic Suspension. Students failing to attain good standing in 
any spring term following academic warning are academically 
suspended and may not attend the university for one term and 
the intenening Summer/Minimester sessions. 

If students complete course work elsewhere while on suspen- 
sion, Towson will NOT accept that work. If students complete 
course work elsewhere while academically suspended, they must 
be in good standing at the school(s) anended and must provide 
official transcripts from the schools to the Readmission Office at 
Towson University if they plan to return to Towson. Work 
remaining to resolve any Incomplete grades may be completed 
during suspension. Academic suspension is noted permanently 
on students' academic records. 

Students who fail to attain good academic standing at the end 
of any fall term following academic warning will be allowed to 
continue their enrollment for one additional term. This Mid- Year 
Extended Warning will be permanently noted on the student's 
academic record. Failure to attain good academic standing at the 
end of the following spring term will result in academic suspen- 
sion. 



GOOD STANDING AND SATISFACTORY 
ACADEMIC PROGRESS 

Students are considered to be in good academic standing and mak- 
ing satisfactopi" academic progress toward the degree if they are 
permitted to continue enrollment at the universit>\ Students who 
have been academically suspended and are later readmitted on pro- 
bation are not considered to be in good academic standing and 
might not be eligible for participation in intercollegiate athletics, 
financial aid, housing or certain extracurricular activities. 

To remain in good academic standing, students must possess a 
minimum cumulative GPA based on the calculable grades at 
Towson University and accepted transfer credits as indicated 
below: 

MINIMUM GRADE POINT AVERAGE REQUIRED 



Units (includes Towson units and 
accepted transfer credits) 
1-29.5 
30-59.5 
60 and above 



.Minimum 

Cumulative GPA 

1.50 

1.75 

2.00 



FAILURE TO REMAIN IN GOOD STANDING 

Students who fall below the level required for good academic 

standing are subject to the following actions; 

1. Academic Warning. The first time degree candidates fail to 
attain the minimum cumulative GPA required, according to the 
above table, they receive an academic warning and should 
receive additional academic advising. They must attain the min- 
imum GPA required by the end of the next spring term of atten- 
dance or be academically suspended. If no further action is 
taken, the notice of academic warning will be removed from stu- 
dents' academic records upon graduation. Eligibility for hous- 
ing, financial aid, and participation in intercollegiate athletics 
will be determined by the appropriate departments according to 
their established criteria. In accordance with policy, students 
who are readmitted on warning must also attain the minimum 
required GPA by the end of the spring term following readmis- 
sion or be academically suspended. 

Regardless of cumulative GPA, freshmen and sophomores on 
academic warning ivho earn at least a 2.00 term average based 
on at least 12 units toward GPA will be automatically continued 
on warning for one term. 



3. Academic Probation, .\fter the suspension ends, students may be 
readmitted on academic probation, during which time they may 
enroll for a maximum of 13 units per term. They must also 
receive additional advising and may not register without written 
clearance from the Academic Advising Center. Academic proba- 
tion is noted permanently on students' academic records. 

Students on academic probation have three academic years or 
24 earned units toward GPA, whichever comes first, to attain 
good academic standing. If students attain good academic stand- 
ing during probation but subsequently fall below the minimum 
requirements for good academic standing, they will be given a 
one-term exception during which good academic standing must 
be attained. If they do not, they will be academically dismissed. 
Otherwise, they are considered to be on academic probation until 
they have either graduated or are academically dismissed (see 
below). 

While on academic probation (not in good academic standing), 
students may not complete course work elsewhere for transfer to 
Towson. 

4. Academic Dismissal. Students failing to anain good academic 
standing after the period of academic probation will be academ- 
ically dismissed. Academic dismissal is a final action and is noted 
permanently on students' academic records. Students who are 
academically dismissed cannot be readmitted to the university in 
any capacity. 

TRANSFERRING WORK TO TOWSON 

The following regulations pertain to current TL' students wishing to 
transfer course work from other institutions to Towson Universit>'. 
Only currently enrolled degree candidates in good academic stand- 
ing are eligible to transfer course work. 

Regulations Pertaining to Transfer Credit 

1. Towson students who wish to take courses at other accredited 
institutions with the intent of applying those credits toward a 
degree at Towson must complete a Petition to Transfer Credit 
Form, available in the Registrar's Customer Service Center, 
Enrollment Services, room 223. The petition may require the sig- 
nature of the chair of the department in which the equivalent 
course is offered at Towson. Petitions must be completed and 
returned to the Registrar's Office and approved by the Academic 
Standards Committee before registration for the course(s) at 
another institution. 

2. Credit is accepted by Towson for courses completed at regionally 
accredited colleges or universities. Only the courses and credits 



Academic Regulations 



completed at other institutions are transferable to Towson. 
Grades and GPAs earned at other institutions are not transfer- 
able. Credit will count toward graduation but will not be used in 
calculating the academic average required for graduation. 

3. Courses transfer to Towson as they were taken at the host insti- 
tution. For example, if a student completes a 200-level course at 
the host institution and transfers it to TU, the course will trans- 
fer as 200-level, even if the course's equivalent at TU is 300- or 
400-level. 

4. Courses transferred from rwo-year institutions cannot be used to 
satisf>' the Advanced Composition degree requirement. Writing 
courses taken at four-year accredited institutions may be consid- 
ered as meeting this requirement upon request by students for 
evaluation by the appropriate academic department or, where 
necessary, by TU"s Department of English. 

5. Transfer students. Courses that have been accepted previously 
for transfer credit by TU or have been attempted or completed 
for credit at TU may not be repeated at other mstitutions with 
the purpose of transferring them to TU. Courses in which a 
grade equivalent of 1.00 or higher has been earned at accredited 
Maryland institutions are transferable. However, courses in 
which a grade equivalent of 1.00 was earned and transferred to 
Towson cannot be applied toward a major or minor program. A 
grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher is required for major credit. 
Students must repeat at Towson any course previously trans- 
ferred with a grade below the 2.00 level in order to meet major 
requirements. 

6. Native students. Courses attempted at Towson may not be 
repeated at other institutions for the purpose of receiving credit 
at TU or adjusting the Towson record. (See Repeating Courses.) 
Students may not fail a course at TU, repeat it at another college, 
and expect the course to transfer to the university. 

^. With prior permission, students may take courses for transfer to 
Towson University until they have attained 90 units. However, 
no more than 64 units may be transferred from an accredited 
rwo-year institution. 

8. Students are expected to complete the final 30 units toward their 
degrees at Towson. Exceptions may be granted in cases of doc- 
umented extraordinary circumstances. Students must petition 
the Academic Standards Committee to transfer work after hav- 
ing earned 90 units. Petitions must be presented before students 
register for courses at other institutions. 

Students with 90 or more units seeking to transfer courses 
required toward the major or minor program must include with 
the petition a brief note from the department chair or program 
coordinator supporting the request and accepting the course and 
units toward the major or minor. 



GRADUATION 

Students who have successfully completed all requirements for a 
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Fine Arts, 
Bachelor of Music or Bachelor of Technical and Professional 
Studies degree are eligible for graduation. 

There are three graduation evaluation periods: December, May 
and August. Ceremonies are held in May and January. Note, how- 
ever, that attending the ceremony does not automatically denote 
graduation, since evaluation of records cannot be completed until 
all grades are available. You must apply for graduation in order to 
receive ceremony information. 

Applications for graduation must be completed online at 
http://students.towson.edu. This site provides a description of the 
graduation process and links directly to the new computer system's 
application. Applicants need to be sure that their name for their 
diploma is correctly listed. 

Deadlines for applying are five to eight months prior to the 
expected graduation date: 

May graduation — apply by September 30 of year prior to 
graduation year 

August graduation — apply by March 30 of graduation year 
December graduation — apply by May 30 of graduation year 

When students have earned approximately "^5 units, the 
Academic Advising Center (Lecture Hall, 410-^04-24^2) prepares 
a Junior Audit of their progress toward fulfilling GenEd require- 
ments. Students usually have at least a year following the audit to 
meet any outstanding requirements. Some academic departments 
will do an audit of major requirements at the same time. 

Important! Students must apply for graduation to begin the 
graduation clearance process. Refer to the University Curriculum 
and Academic Regulations sections of this catalog for additional 
graduation information. 

CLASS RANK 

Towson University calculates class rank for three set percentiles: 
the top 10th, 20th and 25th percentiles of the graduating class. The 
top 10th percentile is automatically posted to the transcript of 
these qualified graduates three months after the graduation date. 
This calculation is based on the whole Towson University record. 
Students in the top 20th or 25th percentile who would like the des- 
ignation posted on the record must request this by notifi,'ing the 
Graduation Office in writing at 8000 '^'ork Road, Enrollment 
Services Center, room 225, Towson, MD 21252-0001. 



TRANSCRIPTS OF ACADEMIC RECORDS 

The Records Office can normally process a transcript request with- 
in three to five working days, except during periods of increased 
demand at the end of each term, when transcript requests may take 
longer to process. Regular transcript requests will be processed 
without charge. Rush transcripts, mailed within 24 hours of the 
request, require a $10 service fee. Towson requires a written 
request. Requests must include dates of enrollment, full name at the 
time of enrollment. Social Securit)' number or TLI ID, and current 
address. All requests must have the signature of the requestor. 
Transcript Request Forms are available in the Registrar's Customer 
Service Center, Enrollment Services, room 223 or students may 
send a letter to the Records Office, Towson University, 8000 York 
Road, Towson, MD 21252-0001. A fax is also acceptable: The fax 
number is 410-704-3443. Current students may request transcripts 
online at http://students.towson.edu. Click on Online Services and 
Official Transcript. 



Undergraduate Planning Guide 



Undergraduate Planning Guide 

To help you think about the many wonderful opportunities avail- 
able to you at Towson University, here is a simple planning guide. 

• YEARl 

Career Choices (see the Career Action Plan in this section) 

Explore off-campus part-time and summer jobs at the Career 
Center. 

Begin to build a career network: seek facult)', staff, alumni and 
peers to discuss major/career choices. 

Study Abroad 

There are many exciting opportunities to discover around the 
world while you continue to earn credit at Towson. Towson stu- 
dents may choose to study abroad in almost any country, and in 
almost any subject area. Experiences that you have while overseas 
will give you new perspectives and will be valuable to future 
employers. 

You can study abroad in any year after your freshman year, but 
it pays to start planning one year ahead. 

Think about these questions: 

Do you want to perfect a language you have already acquired 
or learn a new one? 

Do you have a preference for certain countries? Will your 
preference mean you should take that language at Towson before 
you study abroad? Plan accordingly! 

How long would you like to stay? Programs are available for 
an academic year, a term, a summer or a Minimester. 

Will you want to take courses in your major or minor, or 
study something completely different? 

Attend a group advising session with the staff of the Study 
Abroad Office to see if this could be a good fit for you. 

Apply for study abroad scholarships during the year before you 
go abroad. See your financial aid adviser early in the year before 
you are thinking of going abroad. 

• YEAR 2 

Career Choices (see the Career Action Plan in this section) 

Whether you seek a job after you finish college or attend gradu- 
ate school, you will need references from your professors. Develop 
relationships with faculty who teach subjects that interest you. 

Explore requirements for a related internship in your junior year. 

Study Abroad 

Attend a group advising session with the staff of the Study 
Abroad Office to see if this could be a good fit for you. 

Apply for study abroad scholarships during the year before you 
go abroad. See your financial aid adviser early in the year before 
you are thinking of going abroad. 



Graduate School 

Whether you plan to go on for graduate study or not, talk to 
your adviser or a faculty member you know about what graduate 
school is like and what might be the benefits of earning a master's 
degree or doctorate in any of the fields that interest you. 



•YEAR 3 

Career Choices (see the Career Action Plan in this section) 

Participate in campus leadership activities and career-related 
organizations. 

Seek major-related part-time, summer or on-campus employ- 
ment. 

Study Abroad 

There's still time to plan for study abroad in your senior year. 

Graduate School 

Fall term: Browse through a college guide, such as Peterson's 
Guide, to get a feel for the admissions requirements, curriculum, 
and expectations of several schools that offer graduate programs in 
your field of interest. 

Spring term: Meet with your adviser in your major department 
to explore which schools offer the best graduate programs in your 
field of interest. Request admissions materials and catalogs from 
the three or four schools you might like to attend. 

Talk to your adviser about what, if any, graduate school exams 
you should take for entry into a program. Once the exams are 
decided upon, you should take them as early as possible because 
several of the exams can be retaken. 

•YEAR 4 

Career Choices (see the Career Action Plan in this section) 

Identify and research potential employers. 

Plan job search strategy. 

Investigate and pursue job openings. Use the resources available 
in the Career Center. 



Undergraduate Planning Guide 



Career Action Plan 



A satisfying and rewarding career doesn't happen overnight and is 
not necessarily the automatic outcome of a college education. 
Career development occurs gradually, throughout a person's life- 
time. It is the product of decisions made, knowledge acquired, 
experiences gained, and actions taken. The years associated with 
college are ones in which great strides in an individual's career 
development usually take place. 



Use your time at 

TU to shape the 

future YOU desire. 


Freshmen 

Assessment and 
Awareness 


Sophomores 

Inquiry and 
Exploration 


Juniors 

Gaining Career 
Experiences 


Seniors 

Job Search 

and Transition to 

World of Work 


Choose Major 
and Career 


• Consult with F'Y'E adviser 
about major options. 

• Meet with career counselor 
at COC to explore major and 
appropriate career paths. 

• Use Discover, a comprehen- 
sive career computer pro- 
gram available through COC 
and CC. 

• Register for GENL 121 
Personal Life and Career 
Planning course. 

• Read through the TU 
Undergraduate Catalog. 


• .Meet with faculty- 
advisers about 
major/career interests. If 
unsure about major or 
unclear about GenEd 
requirements, see 
U.\AC. 

• .Meet again with career 
counselor at COC about 
major/career choices. 

• Begin to build career 
network. 

• Finalize declaration of 
major. 


• E.xpand knowledge of 
major and its relation- 
ship to possible careers. 

• Consider options for 
graduate or professional 
school. 

• Focus on career net- 
work. Set up informa- 
tional interviews with 
TU alumni, professionals 
in an area of interest, 
and internship employ- 
ers. Obtain information 
at AR, CC, COC. 


• Meet with career coun- 
selor at COC to discuss 
transition from school to 
work. 

• Identify and research 
potential employers. 

• Use TU Alumni Career 
Network. 

• Plan job search strategy 
at CC. 

• Learn to market yourself 
effeaively. Attend semi- 
nars sponsored by CC. 


Supplement 

Academic 

Studies 


• Attend events related to 
major/career mterests, e.g., 
Career Awareness Week. 

• Visit career libraries m CC, 
COC, CL, public libraries; 
browse WViTV. 

• Visit AAC to improve study 
skills. 

• Visit OSA for information of 
campus activities. 


• Participate in campus 
leadership actinties. 
Contact OSA for infor- 
mation. 

• Continue to visit career 
libraries in CC, COC, 
CL, public libraries: 
browse WWW. 

• .Attend career-related 
events sponsored bv CC, 
COC, UAAC. 

• Consider a job shadow 
through CC. 


• Continue to attend 
career-related events; job 
fairs, seminars, open 
houses, etc. 

• Assume an active role in 
clubs or organizations to 
develop or enhance 
leadership and other 
transferable skills. 

• Get involved in career- 
related professional 
organizations. 


• Attend conferences or 
meetings of career- 
related and professional 
organizations to build 
network of contacts in 
chosen field. 

• Continue to attend 
career-related events 
sponsored bv CC, COC, 
UAAC. 


Develop 
Portfolio 


• Collect outstanding course 
work, projects, writing sam- 
ples, accomplishments, letters 
of recommendation, photo- 
graphs of activities, evalua- 
tions, etc. 


• Continue collection of 
portfolio materials. 

Include work-in-progress 
to show ability to edit, 
revise and improve. 


• Organize for presenta- 
tion to employers. Solicit 
feedback on contents 
from adviser, department 
chair, and professionals 
in chosen field. 


• Submit completed port- 
folio to adviser, depart- 
ment chair, and other 
professionals for 
critique. 


Build Work 
Experience 
and Values 


• Identifi- life and work 
values with COC/CC 
inventories. 

• Explore on-campus, off- 
campus, part-time and 
summer jobs at CC. 

• Consider an FW'S/CS 
experience. 

• Check out volunteer 
opportunities at OSA. 


• Increase marketahilin,; 
build transferable skills 
through part-time and 
summer jobs, FWS/CS, 
and volunteer work 
experiences. 

• Determine and test work 
values in part-time and 
summer ]obs. 

• Explore requirements for 
major-related internship 
in junior year. 


• Seek and apply for an 
internship at CC. 

• Look for major-related 
part-time, summer and/ 
or FWS/CS positions at 
CC. 


• Participate in the On- 
Campus Recruiting 
Program via CC: job 
fairs, on-campus inter- 
viewing, mock inter- 
views, information ses- 
sions and employer days. 
Consider a second 
internship to increase 
marketability. 


Create 
Resume 


• Sign up for Hire@TU, a 
FREE Web-based job search 
database offered by CC. 


• .\dd new volunteer and 
work experiences and 
indicate newlv developed 
skills. 

• Visit CC for resume 
critique. 


• Use Hire@TU to update 
resume. 

• Continue to meet with 
CC staff for additional 
resume reviews. 


• LIse HireCs'Tl'and the 
employment seirices at 
CC. 

• Continue to update 
resume. 

• Prepare a list of 
references. 



.•VAC Academic Achievement Center 

410-704-2291 
AR Alumni Relations/410-704-2234 
CC The Career Center/410-704-2233 



Counseling Center 

Glen Esk 

410.704.2512 

www.towson.edu/studentlife/ccnter 



CL Cook Library/410-704-2462 

COC Counseling Center/410-704-2512 
FWS/CS Federal Work Study/ 

Communitv SerMce/4I0-"(M-22' i 



The Career Center at Towson University 
7800 York Road 
410.704.2233 

wHw.iowson.edu/carecrccntcr 



OSA Office of Student Activities/4 1 0-704-3307 
SE Student Employment410-704-2233 
UAAC Universin' Academic .\dvising 
Center/4 i0-~n4-24": 



University Academic Advising Center 

Lecture Hall 

410.704.2472 

« ww.towson.cdu/advising 



Undergraduate Admissions 



Undergraduate Admissions 

OFFICE 

Enrollment Services Center, Second Floor 

410-704-2113 

Fax: 410-704-3030 

1-888-4TOWSON 

www.discover.towson.edu 

Please assist us in serving you by scheduling an appointment for an 

admissions interview or campus tour 

Hours: Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
(evening hours by appointment only) 
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Saturday, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. during academic year 
except holidays (check Web site for specific dates) 

Louise Shulack, Director 

Mark Jacque, Associate Director 

Angela DeVito, Associate Director 

Stephanie Fowler, Associate Director 

Christine Collins, Senior Assistant Director 

Brian Leak, Senior Assistant Director 

Haley Klein, Assistant Director 

Rebecca Nori, Assistant Director 

Inda Watrous, Assistant Director 

Joetta McDovvney, Assistant Director 

Gary Harner, Transfer Evaluator 

Jessica Hurst, Transfer Evaluator 

Lauren Dougherty, Transfer Evaluator 

WHEN TO APPLY 

The application deadlines below are for first-time, degree-seeking 
students. Application deadlines and policies for Second Bachelor's 
and non-degree students are listed under Non-Traditional 
Undergraduate Programs in this catalog. 

Freshmen: First term of senior year of high school for the fall term. 
Transfer Students: By November 15 for the spring term; by 

February 15 for the fall term. 
International Students: By November 15 for the spring term; by 

June 1 for the fall term. 
Scholarship Candidates: By December 1 for the fall term. 
Admission to Towson University is granted to applicants whose 
academic and personal qualifications give promise of academic suc- 
cess. The university reserves the right to close admissions when no 
space remains available. 

Students seeking freshman admission for the fall should file an 
application during the first term of the senior year of high school. 
Students seeking transfer admission may file as early as October 1 
for the following fall term. Full-time applicants for the fall term 
who would like to be considered for an Admissions scholarship 
should submit an application, high school or college transcript(s) 
and SAT I/ACT results no later than December 1. 

Applications for fall received after the February 15 deadline are 
processed provided space is available in the entering class. Students 
who fail to enroll for at least one course during the term for which 
they have been admitted as a degree candidate will have the offer 
of admission revoked because of nonmatriculation. To enroll as a 
degree candidate for any subsequent term, students must reapply 
and submit new application materials and pay all appropriate fees. 

Persons who have been denied admission to Towson University 
will not be permitted to attend as non-degree students. They may, 
however, transfer to the university if they meet transfer admission 
requirements after attending another college or university. Persons 
who have graduated from high school within the last two years 
must formally apply for degree-seeking status in order to attend the 
universirv. 



ADMISSIONS PROCEDURE 

1. An applicant for full-time admission may receive application 
materials from the guidance office of the secondary school, the 
counseling office of the junior/community college, or from the 
Office of Admissions of the university. Electronic, online applica- 
tions are also available through the Towson University Web site at 
www.discovertowson.edu. 

2. The applicant should complete the application and return it to 
the Office of Admissions with the appropriate application fee. The 
application fee is neither deferrable nor refundable. Each applicant 
is responsible for the office's receipt of his or her official high 
school transcript, including final grades with verification of gradu- 
ation, as it becomes available, and a completed transcript supple- 
ment (Guidance Counselor's Recommendation). The transfer appli- 
cant must forward official transcripts of all college work attempt- 
ed or completed, ivhether or not credit was earned, from all insti- 
tutions attended. 

3. The standardized test required for admission is the SAT I of 
the College Entrance Examination Board. All freshman applicants 
and transfer students with fewer than 30 transferable college-level 
credit hours must submit the results of this test sent to the director 
of Admissions. Students should take the test in the junior and/or 
senior year of high school. Students entering TU beginning fall 
2006 must submit SAT scores that include the new writing score. 
Students who completed high school prior to 2006 may submit 
prior SAT test scores. Towson University's College Board identifi- 
cation code number is 5404. ACT results may be substituted for 
SAT I, but must include the writing portion of the ACT. 

4. Incomplete applications will be canceled. Approved applica- 
tions which remain incomplete for lack of final high school or col- 
lege transcripts will also be canceled. The applications of admitted 
students who do not enroll for the given term will be canceled. 

5. All entering degree-seeking students born after December 31, 
1956, including new graduate students and transfers, will be 
required to demonstrate physician-documented proof of immunity 
to the following diseases: Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus, Polio, 
Measles, Mumps, and Rubella. 

An Immunization Record Form is sent to every admitted student. 
The completed form, signed by a physician, must be returned to the 
Dowell Health Center by the time of orientation and registration. 
Students who fail to return the form or to correct any inadequacies 
in immunity status in a timely fashion will be blocked from the fol- 
lowing spring term registration. (For those students entering in the 
spring term, noncompliance will result in blocked registration for 
the following fall term.) The block will be lifted by Dowell Health 
Center as soon as the requirements are filled. 

The specific vaccine requirements are listed on the Immunization 
Record Form. Students are responsible for obtaining any immu- 
nizations needed to satisfy university requirements from their regu- 
lar source of medical care prior to arriving on campus. 

GUIDELINES FOR FRESHMAN ADMISSION 

Admission to Towson University is competitive based on the appli- 
cant pool and available space in the freshman class. Priority for 
admission is based on high school performance (in grades 9-11) as 
demonstrated by the grades earned. Strength and rigor of the cur- 
ricula are considered. Many applicants exceed minimum required 
course work and level of work in their high school curriculum. In 
some cases, senior mid-year grades are requested and considered in 
the review of an application. Performance on the SAT I or ACT is 
also evaluated. 

Freshman candidates will be expected to have completed four 
(Carnegie) units of English (including one each of composition, 
English literature and American literature), three units of social 
sciences, three units of science (2 with labs), three units of mathe- 
matics (Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry), two units of a foreign 
language (some technology, computer science and sign language 
courses may be substituted) and six elective units. Any applicant 



Undergraduate Admissions 



whose high school transcript does not include this combination of 
curriculum requirements may be admitted with the understanding 
that select deficiencies must be completed during the first term of 
the freshman year at Towson. Students who are admitted under 
this condition and who fail to complete the stipulated courses with- 
in the first term will have their degree candidacy withdrawn. High 
school-level reading, writing and mathematics courses taken at 
Towson will not carry' graduation credit. 

GUIDELINES FOR TRANSFER ADMISSION 

To be considered for transfer, students must have completed a min- 
imum of 30 semester hours of transferable college-level work and 
be in good academic standing; this cannot include remedial or 
preparatory courses or nontraditional course work, such as Credit 
for Prior Experience/Learning, Military Science, the College Level 
Examination Program (CLEP), DANTES, USAFL ACE evalua- 
tions, etc. Students with fewer than 30 transferable semester hours 
must comply with the requirements for incoming freshmen and 
possess the minimum transfer GPA. 

The requirements for transfer admission vary, depending on the 
total number of transferable credit hours completed and the cumu- 
lative combined GPA from all institutions attended. 

Priority admission is reserved for transfer students from a 
Maryland community college who have earned at least 56 trans- 
ferable credits, are in good academic standing, and have main- 
tained a GPA that meets the policies set by the Maryland Higher 
Education Commission and University System of Maryland poli- 
cies. Students who have earned fewer than 56 transferable credicsor 
who are transferring from an institution other than a Maryland 
community college, will be admitted based upon combined cumu- 
lative GPA of transferable credits and space availability. 

Upon official acceptance to the university, students must main- 
tain the established cumulative GPA required for admission (inclu- 
sive of current course work) and remain in good academic stand- 
ing; otherwise, the university's offer of admission will be with- 
drawn. 

Any transfer applicant who has attended Towson as a non- 
degree student must possess at least a 2.00 GPA for all course work 
attempted through the university, even if the applicant is admissi- 
ble based on course work subsequently completed at other institu- 
tions. Students who apply for transfer admission based on their 
non-degree status must meet the admissions requirements listed 
above. 

Waiting List 

Applicants who are currently enrolled in course work that may 
qualify them for admission will have their applications reviewed 
after official transcripts, including grades for that work, are 
received. These students are encouraged to make alternative plans 
for admission to other colleges in the event that the university is not 
able to extend an offer of admission because of lack of space at the 
end of that particular term. Refer to the current undergraduate 
admission application or transfer guide for specific details. 

TRANSFER POLICY 

(Also see the Academic Regulations section and Appendix B of this 

catalog.) 

\. Transfer of course credit. 
The Office of Admissions at Towson University assists transfer 
students with a variety of services, from personal interviews to 
the ARTSYS on the Web, http://artweb.usmd.edu. These services 
are designed to guide students in judicious course selections 
while they are still enrolled at their transfer institutions. Through 
a well planned selection of courses prior to transfer, students can 
often complete some major requirements and some TU General 
Education (GenEd) requirements upon official matriculation. 



Transfer course work is evaluated by the Office of Admissions 
on a form known as the Evaluation of Transfer Credit. Transfer 
credit will be allowed for most academic courses completed at 
any regionally accredited two- or four-year college or universi- 
ty; this credit will transfer into TU as either GenEd or free elec- 
tive/potential major credit. Some restrictions do apply, howev- 
er; courses that are not parallel or discipline-compatible with 
TTJ courses may not transfer; development/remedial, personal 
development, college orientation, technical/occupational, and 
selected business courses do not transfer; finally, any course 
transferred as equivalent to TO ENGL 102, Writing for a 
Liberal Education, must carry a grade equivalent of 2.00 or 
higher to meet graduation requirements. 

2. Maximum number of transfer credits accepted. 

The maximum number of credits allowed in transfer from a 
two-year institution (community/junior college) is 64. The max- 
imum number of credits allowed in transfer from a four-year 
institution or from a combination of two- and four-year institu- 
tions is 90. The standard measure of credit at TOI is the unit; 
quarter-hour credits are converted into units by a two-thirds 
ratio. 

3. Maximum number of units allowed for non-traditional learning. 
CLEP credit is selectively transferred. Credit will be award- 
ed for the following exams if the minimum score of 50 is earned: 

Humanities 6 units 

Math 6 units 

Natural Sciences 6 units 

Social Sciences and History 6 units 

A total of 24 units (6 units for each successfully completed sec- 
tion) will be awarded in transfer. Credit for other CLEP tests is 
evaluated after admission by th. Office for Non-Traditional 
Undergraduate Programs. The maximum number of units 
allowed for non-traditional learning is 45. 

AP credit is usually awarded on the basis of scores of 3 or 
above. A detailed description of Advanced Placement credit fol- 
lows under the appropriate heading. There is no limit to the 
number of units that can be earned through AP. 

In order for any CLEP or AP credit to be reviewed and/or 
awarded, students must provide the Office of Admissions with 
an official report from Educational Testing Service. 

Credit for military training is reviewed and awarded or denied 
by the Office for Non-Traditional Undergraduate Programs. 
Before credit can be posted, students must have attended TU for 
one term as degree candidates with a 2.00 cumulative GPA and 
have submitted all of the necessary official military documents 
to the Office for Non-Traditional Undergraduate Programs. 

4. Minimum number of units required through classroom instruc- 
tion in the major field and for the degree. 

Towson University requires that students earn a minimum of 
120 units toward a degree. Of these 120 units, il must be 
upper-level, that is, junior/senior (300-400) level courses. 
Students must complete a minimum of 30 units in residence at 
TO; at least 15 units must be completed in degree candidate sta- 
tus. 

The number of units required for the completion of a single 
major at TU varies from 30 to over 70 units, depending on the 
intended major. 

Grades of D will transfer into the university as GenEd/elective 
credit; however, in order to satisfy TO"s ENGL 102 Writing for 
a Liberal Education graduation requirement, a grade equivalent 
of 2.00 or higher must be earned. Grades of C- or lower will not 
qualify for major credit. 

5. Transfer of General Education (GenEd) requirements. 
Transfer students who have satisfied the GenEd requirements at 
a Maryland public postsecondary institution will only be 
required to complete 10-16 additional units of General 
Education and specific courses required of all students at TTJ, 
with the total number of GenEd units not to exceed 46 units. 



Undergraduate Admissions 



(For information regarding specific GenEd requirements refer to 
General Education Requiiements under the University 
Curriculum section of this catalog.) 
6. Transferabilit) of credit for non-traditional learning. 



Source 

Advanced Place- 
ment Program 
(CEEB) 

CLEF 



Accept 
Credit 

yes 



yes 



DANTES 

Departmental 
Exams from other 
Colleges 



yes 



Excelsior College yes 
Exams 



Military' Credit yes 

(ACE Guide to the 
Evaluation of Edu- 
cational Experiences 
in the Armed 
Services) 

Nursing School no 

NoncoUegiate yes 

ly 

Work Accredited 
by ACE 



Portfolio Units yes 

from other 

Colleges 



High School yes 

Articulation (college 
courses at high 
school) 



Elective 

or 
Required 

elective & 
required 

elective & 
required 



elective & 
required 



required 



elective & 
required 



elective 



elective & 
required 



elective & 
required 



Grades/ 
Scores 

usually 3 or higher 



see Transfer Polic\' 
(item 3 above) and 
the section on 
Credit for Prior 
Learning under 
University 
Curriculum 



passing grade; 
a grade equivalent 
of 2.00 or higher 
in college's 
composition 
courses 

evaluated 
individually by the 
Office for Non- 
Traditional 
Undergraduate 
Programs and 
Nursing Dept. 

evaluated 
individually by the 
Office for Non- 
Traditional 
Undergraduate 
Programs 



evaluated individual- 

by the Office for 
Non-Traditional 
Undergraduate 
Programs 

passing grade; a 
grade equivalent 
of 2.00 or higher 
in composition 
courses 

passing grade; a 
grade equivalent 
of 2.00 or higher 
in composition 



Evaluation of Transfer Credits 

The letter of admission for a transfer applicant includes the esti- 
mated number of credits transferable to Towson. After the student 
accepts the university' "s offer of admission (by returning the 
Enrollment Contract and fee), he or she will receive an official 
evaluation of transferable credits from the Office of Admissions. 
This evaluation is usually (but not always) preliminary' in nature, as 
the student is usually taking additional courses at the time of 
admission. A final evaluation of credit will be prepared after the 
final grades for the most current term are received m official tran- 
script form from the student's former college or university. All 
final transcripts are due in the admissions office prior to the stu- 
dent's Orientation date. The appropriate cumulative average, as 
determined by the number of credits completed and good academ- 
ic standing must be maintained, however, or the university's offer 
of admission will be withdrawn. See Guidelines for Transfer 
Admission Policy for the appropriate cumulative GPA necessary for 
maintaining admission eligibilit)'. Failure to meet this requirement 
will result in the cancellation of the university's original offer of 
admission and in the forfeiture of all related fees and privileges. 
Additionally, failure to forward an official final transcript before 
enrollment at the university or the first day of classes will prohibit 
future registration and the release of official TU transcripts. 

Upon receipt of a final evaluation, the transfer student should 
review its contents carefully. If the student has any questions or 
feels there is an error, the Office of Admissions must be advised 
ivithin 30 days. In no case will changes, additions, or corrections 
be made to the evaluation after the student has completed the first 
term in residence at Towson University. 

Transfer students are subject to the GenEd and ma]or require- 
ments that are currently in effect for the class (that is, the catalog 
year) in which they are admitted. These students have the option, 
however, of following the GenEd and major requirements that were 
in effect at the time they were initially admitted as degree candi- 
dates at their original institution, provided that continuous enroll- 
ment has been maintained. Continuous enrollment has been 
defined as follows: must be, or have been, enrolled at an institu- 
tion of higher education; must have had no more than two sequen- 
tial years of non-enrollment; and must complete the baccalaureate 
degree in no more than 10 years from initial enrollment as a degree- 
seeking student at an institution of higher education. Students who 
have not completed graduation requirements within 10 years 
should meet with an academic adviser to determine the most 
appropriate set of requirements. If a change of catalog is desired, 
students should submit a Catalog Selection Petition form to the 
Registrar's Customer Service Center, Enrollment Services, room 
223 (prior to the completion of their first term at TU). 

Maryland community college transfer students whose first atten- 
dance at any institution of higher education occurred in the fall of 
1990 or later will fall under the guidelines set forth by the 
.Maryland Higher Education Commission on March 21, 1990. (See 
Appendix B for details.) 

Placement Testing for Entering Students 

The Academic .\chievement Center administers the competency 
testing program. This program requires all entering students to 
demonstrate competence in the basic skills of reading, writing and 
mathematics. 

All matriculating freshmen and all transfer students with fewer 
than 30 credits will be administered diagnostic placement tests. 
Students not attaining the required minimum scores on the stan- 
dardized tests will be enrolled in developmental studies courses in 
the basic skills. These courses will not count toward the 120 units 
required for graduation. Students who do not complete their devel- 
opmental requirements by the end of their fourth term will be sub- 
ject to a review of their academic records and mandatory advising. 



Undergraduate Admissions 



The following students are exempt from the competency testing 
program: 

1. Transfer students with 30 or more credits. 
2a. Transfer students with fewer than 30 credits who transfer a 
course equivalent to ENGL102 with a grade equivalent of 2.00 
or higher will be exempt from the reading and writing tests, 
b. Transfer students with fewer than 30 credits who transfer a col- 
lege-level mathematics course will be exempt from the mathe- 
matics tests. 
3a. Freshmen with SAT I verbal scores of 500 or above, or ACT 
English scores of 21 or above, will be exempt from the reading 
and writing tests, 
b. Freshmen with SAT I mathematics scores of 500 or above, or 
ACT Math scores of 21 or above, will be e.xempt from the mathe- 
matics tests. 

U.S. PERMANENT RESIDENT APPLICANTS 

Applicants who hold permanent resident or parole visa status must 
submit a regular application and list their alien registration number 
in the space indicated. They are processed for fee purposes as state 
residents if they have established legal domicile in Maryland for 
one year. Presentation of an applicant's alien registration card for 
verification may be requested. Foreign academic records must be 
translated by an official, recognized evaluation service such as the 
World Education Service, and submitted to the Office of 
Admissions as part of the academic record. An application and all 
documentation must be submitted by November 15 for the spring 
term or February 15 for the fall term. If a permanent resident is a 
nonnative English speaker and has resided in the United States for 
less than five years, a TOEFL result is required. 

SPECIAL ADMISSION PROGRAMS 
Early Admission 

Early admission enables a limited number of students to be admit- 
ted and to matriculate immediately following the completion of 
their junior year in high school. Students interested in early admis- 
sion should apply through the normal application process. Their 
applications, however, must be accompanied by a letter of recom- 
mendation from either the high school counselor or principal. 
Additionally, a letter of recommendation from the student's par- 
entis) should be included. An official high school transcript should 
be submitted along with the results of the SAT 1. An interview with 
the director of Admissions is also suggested. 

On-Catnpus Interviews 

Personal inter\iews are not required and are not used as a criterion 
for admission. Prospective transfer students may request an inter- 
view to discuss questions or concerns they may have. Students are 
encouraged to call three weeks in advance of their visit to schedule 
an appointment with an admissions counselor. 

NON-TRADITIONAL ADMISSION POLICIES 
Veterans and G.E.D. Recipients 

Some high school graduates may qualif\' for special admission con- 
sideration under the provisions of non-traditional admissions. In 
order to be considered under this policy, students must be classified 
into one of the categories described below. Once classified as non- 
traditional applicants, prospective students must apply and submit 
all credentials no later than November 15 for the spring term and 
no later than February 15 for the fall. Admission will be based 
upon basic skills testing in several areas; writing, reading and math- 
ematics. These students can be admitted into degree candidacy only 
if their test results indicate no more than one developmental place- 
ment. In cases where an applicant places into a developmental 
course, any prior college credit earned in these subjects will not be 
transferred to Towson University. Students are encouraged to sub- 
mit their applications as early as possible to ensure adequate 



processing time for the evaluation of the placement tests. In addi- 
tion, it should be understood that referrals for such testing cannot 
be made until a formal application is filed, and completed with all 
appropriate academic credentials in transcript form. 

Veterans: For admission purposes, a veteran may be defined as a 
current or former member of any branch of the U.S. Army Services 
with 12 months (one year) or more of active duty served, and with 
no intervening college or university attendance since discharge 
from the service. In addition to the application form and academic 
credentials, veterans must also provide the Office of Admissions 
and the Veterans Office with a copy of the DD form 214 verifying 
military service. 

G.E.D. Recipients: For admission purposes, the high school 
equivalence (General Education Development) examination stan- 
dards established by the Maryland State Department of Education 
(or other similar agencies in other states) will be used as an alter- 
native to high school graduation. Unless accompanied by accept- 
able SAT I results and a partial high school transcript with which 
to render an admission decision, a G.E.D. recipient will be referred 
for placement testing before an admissions decision is rendered. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

Freshmen who have had the opportunity for advanced-level work 
and would like academic credit as well as advanced placement are 
encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Tests of the College 
Entrance Examination Board in May of their senior year of sec- 
ondary school. Arrangements to take the tests are made through 
the high school counselor or the College Entrance Examination 
Board, PO. Box 592, Princeton, NJ 08540. The results of these 
tests are received by the university in mid-July. The following stan- 
dards are used for determining advanced placement credit: 

Advanced Placement Credit for Entering Students 



Policy 

No credit 

6 units, HIST 145-146 

No credit 

Review of portfolio by Art Department 

Review of portfolio by Art Department 

No credit 

4 units, BIOL 110 

8 units, BIOL 201-202 

No credit 

4 units, CHEM 105 

4units, CHEM 110 

8 units, CHEM 110-111 

No credit 

Exempt from COSC 175 (or COSC 

165), placement into COSC 236 

Exempt from COSC 175 and COSC 

236, placement into COSC 237. 

Upon completion of COSC 237 with 

a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher, 

8 units will be awarded for COSC 

175 and COSC 236.' 

No credit 

Exempt from COSC 175 (or COSC 

165), placement into COSC 236. Upon 

completion of COSC 236 with a grade 

equivalent of 2.00 or higher, 4 units will 

be awarded for COSC 175.* 



Examination 


A,R 




Score 


American History 


1,2,3 




4,5 


Art Historv 


All 


Art Studio; Drawing 


1-5 


Art Studio; General 


1-5 


Biology 


1,2 




3 




4,5 


Chemistry 


1,2 




3 




4 




5 


Computer Science AB 


1,2 




3 



Computer Science A 



4,5 



1,2 
3,4,5 



Undergraduate Admissions 



Examination 


A.P. 

Score 


Policy 


Economics 






Microeconomics 


1,2 


No credit 




3,4,5 


3 units, ECON 201 


Macroeconomics 


1,2 


No credit 




3. 4, 5 


3 units, ECON 202 


English Lit. Comp 






or 

English Lang. Comp 


1,2,3 


No credit 




4, .5 


3 units, ENGL 102 


Environmental Science 


4,5 


3 units, BIOL 105 


European History 


1,2,3 


No credit 




4,5 


6 units, HIST 102-103 


French Language 


1,2 


No credit 




3 


3units, FREN201 




4,5 


6 umts,FREN 202-301 


French Literature 


.\]1 


No credit 


German Language 


1,2 


No credit 




3 


3 units, GERM 201 




4,5 


6 units, GERM 202-301 


German Literature 


.\ll 


No credit 


Human Geography 


3, 4, 5 


3uniis, GEOG 109 


Latin: Vergil 


All 


No credit 


Latin: Cat-Horace 


All 


No credit 


Mjthemjlu's 






Calculus AB 


1,2 


No credit 




3 


4 units, MATH 119 or 4 units, 
MATH 273 upon completion of 
MATH 274 with a grade equivalent of 
2.00 or higher. *t 




4,5 


4 units, MATH 273 


Mathematics 






Calculus BC 


1,2 


No credit 




3 


4 units, MATH 273 and an additional 
4 units, MATH 274 upon completion 
of MATH 275 with a grade equivalent 
of 2.00 or higher. *t 




4,5 


8 units, .MATH 273-274 


Statistics 


3, 4, 5 


3 units, MATH 231 


Music Listening 


1,2 


No credit 


Non-Majors 


3, 4, 5 


3 units, MUSC 101 


Majors 


3,4 


3units, MUSClOl 


-Majors 


5 


3 units, MUSC 102 


Music Theor)' 


3,4,5 


3 units, MUSC 105 


Physics B 


1,2 


No credit 




3,4,5 


8 units, PHYS 21 1-212 


Physics C Mechanics 


1,2 


No credit 




3,4,5 


4 units, PHYS 241 


Physics C Elec/Mag 


1,2 


No credit 




3,4,5 


4 units, PHYS 242 


Psychology 


1,2 


No credit 




3,4,5 


3 units, PS YC 101 


Statistics 


1,2 


No credit 




3, 4, 5 


3 units, MATH 231 


Spanish Language 


1,2 


No credit 




3 


3 units, SPAN 201 




4,5 


6 units, SPAN 202-301 


Spanish Literature 


All 


No credit 


United States 


1,2 


No credit 


Government and 


3,4,5 


Upon completion of an upper-level 


Politics 




POSC course with a grade equivalent of 
2.00 or higher, 3 units will be awarded 
for POSC 103.* 


•It is the responsibility of the student 


to notif>' the .Admissions Office when (he next 


higher level course is completed to receive credit. 


tF-lemenlar>' and F.arly Childhood F.di 


jcation majors should consult the policy on AP 


in the Depanment of Mathematics section. 



INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE 

Towson University recognizes that the Internationa! Baccalaureate 
(IB) program represents achievement beyond the standard 
American high school program and regularly awards advanced 
standing to students who successfully complete IB course work. 

Diploma Holders 

Students who earn an IB Diploma will be awarded 30 units toward 
the bachelor's degree and receive sophomore standing. Some of 
these units may be applied toward Tovvson's General Education 
requirements; each student's IB units will be individually evaluated 
for General Education applicability. 

Certificate Holders 

Students who earn an IB Certificate will be eligible to receive units 
based on the results of their higher level exams only. At least 6 and 
as many as 8 units will be awarded for each higher level exam com- 
pleted with a score of 4 or above. A score of 5 or above is required 
to receive credit for the physics higher level exam. 




Prior to the change of schedule period, students are notified 
about Advanced Placement and credit. Additional information 
may be obtained by contacting the director of Admissions or the 
appropriate departmental chair. 

A bulletin of information about Advanced Placement Tests may 
be secured from the College Entrance Examination Board, P.O. 
Box 592, Princeton, N.J. 08540. 



Undergraduate Admissions 



Higher Level IB Course Equivalency 



IB COURSE 


EQUIVALENCY 


GENERAL 
EDUCATION 


UNITS 


Language A 1 


ENGL 240 
ENGL Elective 


ll.C.l 


3 
3 


Language A2 


FORL 101 
FORL 102 


I.C.I orll.D. 
II.C.l orll.D. 


4 

4 


Language B 


FORL 101 
FORL 102 


ll.C.l orll.D. 
II.C.l orll.D. 


4 
4 


Business and 
Organization 


BEEL Elective 
BEEL Elective 




? 


Economics 


ECON201 
ECON 202 


1LC.2 
II.B.2 


3 
3 


Geography 


GEOG 109 
GEOG Elective 


11.C.2 


3 
3 


History 


HIST 151 
HIST Elective 


11. D. 


3 


History of 
Islamic World 


HIST Elective 
HIST Elective 




3 
3 


Philosophy 


PHIL 101 
PHIL Elective 


II.C.l 


3 
3 


Psychology 


PSYC 101 
PSYC Elective 


I1.C.2 


3 


Social 
Anthropology 


ANTH 207 
ANTH Elective 


11. D. 


3 
3 


Biology 


BlOl 201 
BIOL 202 


ll.A.l 
ll.A.l 


4 
4 


Chemistry 


CHEM no 
CHEM 1 1 1 


ll.A.l 
ll.A.l 


4 
4 


Design 
Technology 


IDNM Elective 
IDNM Elective 




3 

3 


Physics 


PHYS2n 
PHYS212 


1I.A.1 
II. A. 1 


4 
4 


Mathematics HL 


MATH lOT 
MATH Elective 


I.e. 


4 
4 


Art/Design 


To Be 
Determined 


To Be 
Determined 




Classical 
Languages 


LATN 301 
LATN 302 


ll.C.l 


3 
3 


Computer 

Science 


cose 236 
cose 237 


LB 


4 
4 


Music 


MUSC 102 
MUSC Elective 


ll.C.l 


3 


Theatre Arts 


THE A 125 
THEA Elective 


IB 


! 



Standard Level IB Course Equivalency 

(Students vvithotit the IB Diploma are NOT awarded credit for 
Standard Level subjects) 



Western Languages fulfill category ll.C.l; non-Western languages 
category II.D. 



fulfill 



IB COURSE 


EQUIVALENCY 


GENERAL 
EDUCATION 


UNITS 


Language Al 


ENGL 240 


ll.C.l 


3 


Language A2 


FORL 101 


ll.C.l orll.D. 


3 


Language B 


FORL 101 


ll.C.l or ILD. 


3 


Language AB 
Initio 


FORL 101 


ll.C.l orll.D. 


3 


Business and 
Organization 


BEEL Elective 




:; 


Economics 


ECON Elective 




3 


Geography 


GEOG 109 


11. c:. 2 


3 


History 


HIST lOT 


11. D. 


! 


History of the 
Islamic World 


HIST Elective 




3 


Information 
Technology in a 
Global Society 


cose 1 1 1 


LB 


, 


Philosophy 


PHIL 101 


ll.C.l 


3 


Psychology 


PSYC 101 


11.C.2 


3 


Social 
Anthropology 


ANTH 207 


11. D. 


3 


Biology 


BlOl 110 


ll.A.l 


4 


Chemistry 


CHEM 110 


ll.A.l 


4 


Design 
Technology 


IDNM Elective 




3 


Environmental 
Systems 


T> Be 
Determined 


To Be 
Determined 




Physics 


PHYS211 


ll.A.l 


4 


Advanced 
Mathematics 


MATH lOT 


I.e. 


4 


Mathematical 
Methods 


MATH 211 


I.e. 


3 


Math 
Studies 


M.WH 111 


I.e. 


^ 


Art/Design 


To Be 
Determined 


To Be 
Determined 




Classical 
Languages 


LATN 202 


ll.C.l 


3 


Computer 
Science 


cose 236 
COSe 237 


LB 


4 

4 


Music 


MUSC 102 


ll.C.l 


3 


Theatre Arts 


THKA 125 


IB 


3 



Western languages fulfill category II.C.l; non-Western languages fulfill 
category II.D. 



International Undergraduate Admissions 



International Undergraduate 
Admissions 

OFFICE 

Administrarion Building 218-A 
410-704-6069 
Fax: 410-704-6070 
www.tovvson.edu/intladm 

Jeffrey M. Haas, Director 

Stanton E. Cheah, Assistant Director 

Laura A. Anderson, Counselor 

Katherine F. McDonald, Administrative Assistant 

Requests for information or admission materials should be made 
far enough in advance to allow processing before deadline dates set 
by Towson Universit}-. 

International applicants who are accepted for admission usually 
begin studies in the fall term (early September) or the spring term 
(late January). The deadline for submitting an application and all 
documentation is June 1 for the fall term and December 1 for the 
spring term. Early application is strongly encouraged. 

Applicants who are accepted for admission will receive the 
Certificate of Eligibilit)' (Form 1-20). This document is used to 
apply for a student (F-1 ) visa at a U.S. Embassy or consulate over- 
seas. It is also used for transferring from one institution in the 
United States to another. F-1 students are required to enroll each 
term as full-time degree candidates and take a minimum of 12 
units. 

The following procedure should be followed by students apply- 
ing for their first American bachelor's degree (students applying for 
a second bachelor's degree should refer to the University 
Curriculum section of this catalog): 

1. Obtain an international student packet. 
Address: 

Office of International Admissions 

Towson University 

8000 York Road 

Towson, MD 21252-0001, U.S.A. 

Telephone: 410-704-6069 

E-mail: intladm@towson.edu 

2. To be considered for admission, applicants are required to 
complete the official international undergraduate application. A 
nonrefundable, U.S. $30 application fee (personal check drawn at 
a U.S. bank or money order drafted in U.S. dollars) must accom- 
pany all applications. 

3. All international applicants must complete an admissions file, 
including: 

a. official or notarized secondary school academic records, 
showing grades received, annual mark sheets, examination certifi- 
cates and leaving certificates, as they apply to the educational sys- 
tem in the student's home country. Records must be received for 
the last three years of secondary school; 

b. official or notarized records (transcripts) of all colleges, uni- 
versities, post-secondary, or professional schools attended; 

c. a notarized English translation of all documents. Translations 
must be as literal as possible with no attempt to translate informa- 
tion into the United States system of education. To evaluate post- 
secondary course work, it is sometimes necessary for the universi- 
ty to use a professional evaluation service at the applicant's 
expense (approximately U.S. $125). The university will notify an 
applicant if this service is required; 



d. proof of English language proficiency by non-native English 
speakers by submitting either: 

i. an official Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 
results. All international students who do not speak English 
as their native language are required to take the TOEFL. A 
minimum score of 500 (paper-based) or 173 (computer- 
based) is required. TOEFL examination dates and informa- 
tion may be obtained through the U.S. Embassy/Consulate 
or bv writing to: TOEFL/TSE Services, Box 6151, Princeton, 
NJ 08561-6151, U.S.A.. The TOEFL Web site is 
www.toefl.org. The results will be reported to Towson if the 
university is indicated on the TOEFL application. The TU 
code number is 5404. 

ii. an SAT verbal score of at least 470; or 

iii.an International English Language Testing System (lELTS) 
minimum score of 5.5. 

e. financial certification. Applicants are required to provide offi- 
cial financial statements verif\ing that U.S. $27,000 is available 
annually to cover their tuition, fees and living expenses. Acceptable 
methods of financial verification are described in the international 
student packet. 

4. International students are required to pay out-of-state tuition. 

5. Most non-native speakers of English admitted to the universi- 
ty are required to take Towson's English placement test to deter- 
mine if preparatory college writing courses are needed. 

6. Applicants holding other r\'pes of visas may also apply to 
Towson and should contact the Office of International Admissions 
for more information. 





Student Life and Campus Services 



Student Life and 
Campus Services 



Whether you live on campus, near campus or commute from 
home, Towson offers many activities and services that will add to 
your enjoyment, increase your opportunities to meet other stu- 
dents, and maximize your chances for a successful Towson career. 
We encourage you to explore the listings below and take advantage 
of some of these excellent resources. 

This section is arranged alphabetically. Detailed descriptions for 
each department below can be found following this list. 

Athletics 

Auxiliar)' Services Business Office 

Campus Life 

Student Activities 

Off-Campus Student Ser\'ices 
Campus Ministries 
Campus Recreation Services 
Career Center 
Counseling Center 
Dining Ser\-ices 
Disabilit)- Support Services 

Testing Services Center 
Diversity Resources 

African American Cultural Center 

SAGE 
Health Services — Dowell Health Center 
Housing and Residence Life 
International Student and Scholar Office 
Judicial Affairs 

National Testing Office (GRE, LSAT, etc.) 
Non-native Speakers of English 

English Language Center 

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) 
One Card -TU I.D. Card 
Orientation and New Student Programs 
Parking 
Post Office 
Shuttle Bus Service 
Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic 
Student Government Association 

Clubs and Organizations 
Student Day Care Center 
Ticket Office 
Universit)' Store 
L'niversit)' Union 
Veterans Office 

Vice President for Student Affairs 
Women's Center 

ATHLETICS 

Towson Center, 410-704-2759 

Towson Uni\ ersitv' is committed to a comprehensive intercollegiate 
athletics program as an integral part of the student's total educa- 
tional experience. The program is a member of the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA) top level - Division L In 
addition, TU enjoys membership in the Atlantic 10 Football 
League, Eastern College Athletic Conference for Gymnastics, and 
the Colonial Athletic Association. The Tigers field men's varsity 
teams in baseball, basketball, football, lacrosse, golf, soccer, and 
swimming and diving. Women's teams are fielded in basketball, 
cross country, field hockey, gymnastics, indoor track, lacrosse, 
soccer, Softball, swimming and diving, tennis, outdoor track, and 
volleyball. 

Student-athletes compete for conference, regional and national 
honors under the guidance of an excellent coaching staff. Towson's 



outstanding athletic facilities include Towson Center Sports 
Complex, Johnny Unitas® Stadium, Burdick Hall pool and John B. 
Schuerholz Baseball Park, all of which make the home of the Tigers 
a showcase facilit)- within the metropolitan Baltimore area. 

The Department of Athletics is proud that its athletes are stu- 
dents first and foremost. This emphasis on academics is reflected in 
the excellent graduation rate of the TU student-athlete population. 
In fact, Towson Universitv' was recognized in the March 2002 U.S. 
News & World Report issue on America's Best College Sports 
Programs for the outstanding graduation rate of its student-ath- 
letes. 

Athletic scholarships are available for gifted student-athletes in 
all sports. Students are encouraged to participate according to 
their interests and abilities. Prospective student-athletes interested 
in competing on a varsit)' team should contact the head coach of 
that sport. Students are also encouraged to support TU teams as 
spectators. 

Students receive one free admission to all home Tiger athletic 
events upon presentation of a valid I.D. card. 

For the latest news on Tiger athletics and schedules, visit 
w\\'w. TowsonTigers.com online. 

AUXILIARY SERVICES BUSINESS OFFICE 

University Union 118, 410-704-2284 

This is a one-stop business transactions office for OneCard Dining 
Points and RetailWending accounts, OneCard ID cards, parking 
permit purchases and parking citation payments, and MVA non- 
resident permits and vending refunds. 

CAMPUS LIFE 

Universitv Union 217, 410-704-2332 
Fax:410-704-2219 
E-mail: parent@Towson.edu 
http://ww\v.new. Towson. edu/campushfe 

Campus Life oversees two offices: Student Activities and New 
Student Programs as well as the fundamental areas of the Parents 
Association, Off-Campus Student Services, and Campus Ministries. 
Staff members in the Office of Student Activities advise the Student 
Government Association, the Campus Activities Board, and assist 
all campus student organizations. Staff members and students plan 
daytime activities, concerts, trips, movies, leadership development 
opportunities, and promote communit)' service. 

The Orientation staff develops programming for all new students 
entering Towson Universit)'. The staff plans activities for Move-In 
Weekend and Orientation, as well as ongoing transitional pro- 
grams for transfer students during the fall and spring terms. 

Campus Life is also home to Off-Campus Student Services. 
Commuter Services seeks to build connections between the univer- 
sity' and its commuter populations by offering a varietv' of com- 
muter-targeted programs. Understanding the demands of commut- 
ing, the office seeks to create resources and programs to assist with 
the areas of off-campus housing, transportation and socialization. 

CAMPUS MINISTRIES 

University Union, 410-704-2268 

A variety of faith communities are represented on campus through 
the support staff assigned to the university. Most advise student 
religious organizations as well as provide a personal ministry in 
counseling, theological discussions, and other supportive areas. In 
addition, most cooperate in sponsoring special programs of speak- 
ers, discussions, films, contemporary issues studies and social 
events. 

CAMPUS RECREATION SERVICES 

Burdick Hall 151, 410-704-2367 
www.towson.edu/campusrec 

Campus Recreation Services (CRS) is made up of five programs: 
Adventure Pursuits, Fitness Sc Wellness, Informal Recreation, 



Student Life and Campus Services 



Intramural Sports, and Sport Clubs. The programs utilize the new 
C.R.i.B fitness center and indoor climbing gym, three gymnasiums, 
Burdick field, beach volleyball court and the pool. CRS supports 
the mission of a healthy campus and encourages students, faculty 
and staff to use the facilities and participate in CRS programs. 

• The Adventure Pursuits program allows students to explore the 
world's wilderness as well as climb a 33-foot indoor wall and 
kayak in the pool. 

• The Fitness & Wellness program allows students to take advan- 
tage of group exercise classes, fitness assessments and instruc- 
tional wellness clinics free of charge. 

• Informal Recreation includes facilities that are open to TU stu- 
dents, faculty and staff when they are not in use or reserved for 
academic classes. Athletics or CRS programming. Facilities 
include Burdick gyms and pool. 

• The Intramural Sports program allows students, faculty and staff 
to form their own sports teams to compete against other teams 
on campus. Team sports such as flag football, soccer and bas- 
ketball are offered along with individual and dual sports such as 
tennis, racquetball and whiffleball. It is a great way for people 
of all skill levels to compete in an organized, recreational atmos- 
phere. 

• The Sport Clubs program offers students the opportunit)' to play 
socially on campus and compete against other schools. 

The Student Handbook contains more information about the pro- 
grams. You can also research CRS on the Web at 
www.towson.edu/campusrec. 

CAREER CENTER AT TOWSON UNIVERSITY 
7800 York Rd., Suite 315, 410-704-2233 
www.towson.edu/careercenter 

The Career Center at Towson University helps students prepare 
and search for meaningful and satisfying careers. The center also 
provides services and information leading to academic internship 
opportunities and on- and off-campus full-time and part-time 
employment. To learn more about the programs and services 
offered by The Career Center, visit www.tovvson.edu/careercenter, 
or call the center for a schedule of information seminars. 

Career Center Services for Students 

• Hire@TU (Web-based Resume Management/Career Search 
System) 

• Career Fairs/Job Fairs 

• Career Advising and Career Counseling 

• Career Resource Library 

• Graduate School Information 

• On-campus Interviewing 

• Student Employment (on- and off-campus) 

• Internships 

• Professional Development Seminars (Resume Writing, 
Interview Skills Training, Networking) 

All employment opportunities are posted on the Web site. 

COUNSELING CENTER 

Glen Esk, 410-704-2512 

College life presents many stresses, life changes, and opportunities 
for persona! growth. To meet these challenges, it is often necessary 
to resolve emotional problems, learn new personal and social skills, 
and work toward developing well-chosen career and personal 
goals. The Counseling Center provides a variety of professional 
services for students who are experiencing personal difficulty or 
who are seeking help toward a greater level of personal effective- 
ness or satisfaction. 

Some of the areas which may be addressed by the Counseling 
Center include: 

• Eliminating blocks to educational or career achievement 

• Career development and decision-making 



• Relationships with friends, roommates, parents, romantic 
partner or spouse 

• Family problems 

• Grief and loss 

• Sexual matters 

• Self-esteem and self-confidence 

• Anxiety, depression and anger 

• Physical stress and tension 

• Eating disorders 

• Physical or sexual mistreatment or abuse 

• Alcohol and drug-related problems 

• Suicidal or self-destructive behavior or thoughts 

• Problems encountered in the university environment 

Most services at the Counseling Center are provided free of 
charge. 

The Counseling Center is staffed by psychologists, substance 
abuse counselors, consulting psychiatrists, and psychologists work- 
ing under supervision. All services at the Counseling Center are 
confidential. For more information or to make an appointment, 
call or drop by Glen Esk, the big white house on the northeast cor- 
ner of the campus. 

Group, Individual and Couples Counseling 

Several kinds of personal counseling are available at the Counseling 
Center. Your initial session can be of immediate assistance as your 
counselor offers a listening ear, helps you to resolve problems and 
informs you about what kinds of further help might be appropri- 
ate. A series of individual counseling sessions offers a private set- 
ting for resolving personal difficulty and achieving personal 
growth. Counseling groups are particularly helpful for many con- 
cerns, giving members an opportunity to share experiences, solve 
problems and practice new skills. Couples counseling provides a 
safe atmosphere for couples to examine and improve their rela- 
tionships. Psychiatric evaluation and medication are also available 
when needed. 

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program 

The Counseling Center offers state-certified alcohol and other drug 
treatment programs (both individual and group services) intended 
to meet various personal needs. Services can assist in achieving a 
greater awareness of a problem or correcting a problem through 
education and recovery. 

Life Planning and Career Development 

The Counseling Center assists students in personal life planning 
and career development in a variety of ways. A career library hous- 
es the computer-assisted career development program, DISCOV- 
ER. This program focuses on the world of work, personal assess- 
ment, occupational planning, and making transitions. Several other 
forms of assessment and information are also provided. 
Professional staff are available by appenntment for individual 
career counseling. Students interested in an intensive, systematic 
approach to career development may register for a Counseling 
Center-sponsored elective 2-unit course titled Personal Life and 
Career Planning (GENL 121). 

Outreach and Consultation 

The Counseling Center staff provides workshops and programs to 
the Towson University community on various topics, including 
time management, assertiveness training, stress management and 
communication skills. We can also work with you to help you 
develop programs to meet your needs. Staff are also available to 
consult with students, faculty and staff on various topics, including 
improving the campus environment, diversity issues or other issues 
relating to the quality of life at Towson University. 



Student Life and Campus Services 



Web Resources 

Funher information about the Counseling Center, self-help 
resources. Web-based mental health self-assessments (for Anxiety 
and Depression, Alcohol, and Eating Disorders), a Wellness 
Assessment, and DISCOV'ER (a computer-assisted career guidance 
program) can be found at www.towson.edu/counseling. 

Referral 

Students sometimes need services that are available only outside 
the Counseling Center, whether on campus or in the surrounding 
communit>'. Counselors can advise students about a variety of 
resources and services that may be useful to students. In addition, 
a referrals assistance specialist is available to assist students in 
identif\'ing qualit)' mental health providers in the outside commu- 
nit\', and in understanding and using their health insurance for 
these services. 

Hours 

The Counseling Center is open Monday through Friday, from 

8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Your Initial Contact 

Call 410-^04-2512 or stop by the Counseling Center to arrange 
your first appointment with a counselor. Initial appointments are 
usually available on the same day you contact us or very soon 
thereafter. If you wish, you may schedule an appointment in 
advance to fit your schedule more conveniently. Emeigency 
appointments are also available. Your counselor will help you 
resolve your immediate concerns and determine what kinds of help 
will be the most useful. 

Confidentiality 

Counseling often deals with very personal and highly private 
issues. Successful outcome depends on a feeling of freedom on the 
part of clients to express feelings, attitudes and thoughts w'ith peo- 
ple who respect them and their right to privacy. Interviews con- 
ducted are confidential and information is not released except with 
the client's written permission or as may be required by law. The 
importance of confidentialit)- is reflected in the Counseling Center's 
adherence to the Code of Ethics of the American Psychological 
Association. 

DINING SERVICES 

University- Union, 410-704-2302 
http://dining.towson.edu 

MEAL PLANS 

No matter where you go on campus, you can find something good 
to eat! We have 13 dining locations and offer a variety of meal 
plans (including vegetarian and kosher cuisine) as well as a-la-carte 
dining. 

All students who live on campus must purchase a meal plan 
(except those who live in the Towson Run Apartments or 
Millennium Hall). Additional meals and snacks can be purchased 
through a Dining Points debit account. Dining points can be used 
at any Dining Services outlet on campus. Dming Points carry over 
from term to term as long as you are a registered student. Dining 
Points are non-transferable, non-refundable. Students access their 
meal plan and Dining Points through their OneCard ID. For more 
mformation, visit our Web site http://dining.towson.edu or call 
Auxiliary Services, 410-704-2530. A student's meal plan status can 
be viewed at the OneCard Web site: http://onecard.towson.edu 

Choosing a Meal Plan 

Choosing a meal plan that works with your schedule and eating 
habits is easy. When you make the decision, consider these ques- 
tions: How many times a day do you eat? Will you be on campus 
most weekends? The majorit)- of resident students - 85 percent - 
choose the Unrestricted meal plan. Fifr\' percent of resident stu- 
dents on the Unrestricted plan choose 14 meals a week. 



Your Choice: Unrestricted or Traditional Meal Plans 

Advantages of Unrestricted Meal Plans: 

• The Unrestricted meal plans are extremely flexible. These 
plans allow you to eat more than one meal per meal period. 
For example, eating lunch at 1 1:05 a.m. and a second meal at 
3:30 p.m., would place both meals in the lunch meal period. 

• If you have an Unrestricted meal plan, you can swap unused 
meals for cash allowances towards a-la-carte purchases at 
numerous locations around campus including PAWS, The 
Den, Susquehanna Food Court and many other locations. 
Customers with an Unrestricted meal plan have fewer missed 
meals than customers that have a Traditional meal plan. 

Advantages of Traditional Meal Plans: 

• A Traditional meal plan costs less than a corresponding 
Unrestricted meal plan. Please note: Traditional meal plans 
limit participants to one meal per meal period. 

What These Meal Plans Have in Common 

Both Unrestricted and Traditional meal plans are for a specific 
number of all-you-can-eat meals per week. All meals must be used 
before the end of the meal plan week or you will lose them. The 
meal plan week begins Friday with breakfast and ends Thursday 
evening. Unrestricted and Traditional meal plans are priced per 
term. You will have the opportunit)- to change your meal plan until 
the last day of the drop/add week each term. 

Your Options* Unrestricted Traditional 

1 9 meals per week with $50 Dining Points $ 1 ,73 1 $ 1 ,5 1 5 

14 meals per week with S50 Dming Points $1,619*'- $1,430 

10 meals per week with $50 Dining Points $1,425 $1,290 

5 meals per week with $200 Dining Points $747. ...seniors only....S 760 

*These costs represent 2004-2005 prices. A price increase should 

be anticipated for the 2005-2006 academic year. 

* *niost popular selection 

The most up-to-date meal plan information is available from our 

Web site. 

Towson Run, Millennium Hall and commuter students are also eli- 
gible to purchase any meal plan, including Block plans. Please 
review the Block meal plan option on the dining Web site. 

Meal Plans for Students with Apartments 

Students with their own apanments usually choose one of the 
Block meal plans. Eating with a Block meal plan is easier than 
shopping for food, fixing it, and cleaning up afterwards. When stu- 
dents use up one block, they can purchase another. Block plans are 
good until the end of the term. 

DISABILFTY SUPPORT SERVICES 

Administration Building 232 
410-704-2638 (Voice or TDD) 
www.towson.edu/tu/dss/ 

Disabilit)^ Support Services (DSS) is the office designated to provide 
reasonable accommodations to students with disabilities. Students 
seeking accommodations must identif)- themselves to DSS, request 
an appointment to discuss their needs, and provide DSS with up-to- 
date and complete documentation of their disabilities by a qualified 
professional. DSS determines what accommodations are reasonable 
on a case-by-case basis, taking into account the student's disabilit)' 
and needs, nature of the learning task, course standards and essen- 
tial requirements of the program of study, and educational envi- 
ronment. 

The t>-pe of documentation needed varies with the disability. 
Generally, a psycho-educational evalution is required for learning 
and cognitive disabilities, a psychiatrist's or psychologist's report is 
required for ADHD and psychological disabilities, while a t)'ped 
letter or report is required from a physician for medical and physical 
disabilities. 



Student Life and Campus Services 



Some of the services and accommodations provided by DSS are: 
pre-admission advisement for prospective students regarding serv- 
ices; priority' registration for course scheduling; disability consulta- 
tion and referral; evaluation and maintenance of all disability 
records for students registered with DSS; preparation of individu- 
alized memos to instructors certifying that the student has a dis- 
ability and stating the determined reasonable accommodations; 
guidance to students, faculty and staff with implementing accom- 
modations; arrangements for classroom accommodations (such as 
note-takers and sign language interpreters); provision of enlarged 
and taped texts; use of the Testing Ser\'ices Center for testing 
accommodations (such as extended time and minimal distraction 
testing space); access to assistive technology and software for read- 
ing and writing; campus orientation and mobility services; and help 
with student advocacy skills. 

Students are encouraged to register with DSS as soon as possible 
after admission to the university to ensure timely provision of serv- 
ices. Students who suspect they have a disability but do not have 
documentation are encouraged to contact DSS for advice on how 
to obtain an appropriate evaluation. Further information is avail- 
able on the DSS Web site or by calling the office. 

Testing Services Center 
Administration Building 232B 
410-704-2304 
Fax: 410-704-4699 

The Testing Services Center provides proctored testing accommo- 
dations (extended time, minimal distraction space, readers, scribes, 
computer access) for Towson University students registered with 
the Disability Support Services Office. Contact the Testing Services 
Center for additional information. 

DIVERSITY 

Office of Diversity Resources 

University Union 232, 410-704-2051 

To facilitate the access and success of students of color and other 
diverse populations, the Office of Diversity Resources (ODR) pro- 
vides educational programs, financial assistance, cultural celebra- 
tions, climate assessment and monitoring, and advocacy and 
advising. Additionally, ODR supports student cultural organiza- 
tions. Programs include Diversity Retreats, Distinguished Black 
Marylanders Awards, Heritage Celebrations, and Cultural 
Kaleidoscope. 

The ODR offers Community Enrichment and Enhancement 
Program (CEEP) grants for undergraduates. The CEEP award ties 
financial assistance to involvement in campus activities. One of the 
activities must contribute to the multicultural environment of the 
campus. For graduate students, the Graduate Diversity Grant is 
available. 

The Office of Diversity Resources is a significant resource for 
diversity information, diversity training, and career and graduate 
school opportunities. For students, faculty and staff with concerns 
related to any form of diversity, the ODR is an excellent place to 
start. 

African American Cultural Center 
University Union 317, 410-704-2641 

The African American Cultural Center (AACC) sponsors programs 
and activities that reflect the lifestyles, history and culture of peo- 
ple of African descent. The center also seeks to stimulate scholar- 
ship at Towson in the areas of African American, African- 
Caribbean and African studies. The center sponsors the Towson 
University Gospel Choir, hosts lectures and discussion groups, pro- 
vides information and referrals, showcases amateur and profes- 
sional artists, and sponsors the Distinguished Black Scholar Lecture 
Series. 



The center, which houses an ever-growing collection of art, 
music, and popular and scholarly literature, provides a comfortable 
setting in which to study, relax and socialize. Student, faculty or 
staff groups may reserve the center for meetings and informal gath- 
erings. 

The center houses a wealth of information concerning graduate 
schools, fellowships, scholarships, employment opportunities, and 
other news relevant to minority students, faculty and staff. The 
information is updated regularly. Students are invited to stop by 
often; no appointment is necessary. 

Fostering A Welcoming Campus Climate 

Towson University is dedicated to a vigorous intellectual life based 
on scholarship and learning. A fundamental premise of the acade- 
my is respect for each individual's right to participate and learn in 
a climate free from racism, prejudice and biased practices. Racism 
and other forms of discrimination may be observed as explicit 
abuse, threatening or directly harmful actions, or subtle devalua- 
tion of an individual based on race, ethnicity or religion. Such 
behaviors demean the entire academic community and will not be 
tolerated by the university. 

The university community, faculty, administrators, staff and stu- 
dents are expected to demonstrate respect for all of that communi- 
ty's members and to actively facilitate the creation and maintenance 
of a positive and constructive milieu. For example, it is the respon- 
sibility of administrators to formulate and implement fair and 
effective practices to prevent discrimination and to respond 
promptly and consistently to complaints. It is the responsibility of 
faculty to provide a classroom environment which discourages dis- 
criminatory behavior and to deal constructively with such behavior 
should it occur. Evaluations of performance and merit for faculty, 
staff and students should not be based on assumptions, expecta- 
tions or attitudes related to race, color, religion, age, sex, national 
origin, sexual orientation and disability. Additionally, all adminis- 
trators, faculty and staff are responsible for nondiscriminatory 
behavior in their interpersonal communications with colleagues, 
staff and students. In all interactions, a model of acceptance of cul- 
tural diversity should be fostered by the university community, fac- 
ulty, administrators, staff and students. 

SAGE Program 

University Union 317, 410-704-3830 

www.towson.edu/sage 

The SAGE (Students Achieve Goals through Education) Program is 
part of the Office of Diversity Resources. It supports Towson 
University's multicultural enrichment and student retention efforts. 
New students participating in the program are encouraged to excel 
academically and involve themselves in the extracurricular life of 
the university during their first year at Towson. Any new student 
can participate in the SAGE Program. Each registered student is 
assigned to a support team consisting of other new students, a cul- 
tural organization representative and a SAGE Program peer men- 
tor. Through workshops and social networking experiences the 
SAGE Program's ultimate goal is to assist students in making a suc- 
cessful transition to the university. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

Dowell Health Center. 410-704-2466 

The Student Health Service, located in Dowell Health Center, offers 
primary care services to any registered student. The Health Center 
is open Monday-Friday throughout the year, with the exception of 
university holidays. Hours during the regular term are 8:30 a.m. to 
4:40 p.m. with limited evening hours by appointment only. Call for 
more information and for January and summer hours. 

The Dowell Health Center has an experienced staff of physi- 
cians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and health educators. 
Services include treatment of common illness and injuries, a full 
range of sexual health services, therapeutic massage, acupuncture. 



Student Life and Campus Services 



nutrition counseling, anonymous HIV testing, office lab tests, 
health education, prescription birth control and medications. 
Charges for services can be paid by check, TU OneCard or billed to 
the student's financial account. Students do not need insurance to 
use the Health Center. 

The Health Center operates by appointment. For non-emer- 
gencies, students should call 410-704-2466 between the hours of 
8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. to make an appointment or to speak with 
a nurse. Patients who walk in without an appointment will be eval- 
uated by a trained nurse and may be treated or given a provider 
appointment based on the urgency and nature of the problem. 

For after-hours emergencies, students should call the University 
Police, 410-704-2133, who will arrange transportation to a local 
emergency room. For nonemergencies after hours, urgent care is 
available at both St. Joseph Medical Center and Greater Baltimore 
Medical Center at the student's own expense. Call 410-704-2466 
for these numbers. 

Health insurance is strongly recommended for all students. The 
university sponsors a plan at reasonable cost which covers most 
sen'ices provided at the Dowell Health Center, as well as X-rays, 
outside lab tests and other diagnostic tests, after-hours care, and 
physician or hospital referrals. 

Immunization Requirements 

The university has a mandatory immunization policy. All degree 
candidates (regardless of units); all international students; and all 
non-degree students (if taking 6 or more units) must comply with 
the immunization requirements to attend class. Documentation 
should be sent or fa.xed to the Health Center before arrival on cam- 
pus, or during TU CARES, to minimize delays in registration for 
subsequent terms. Immunizations are available at the Dowell 
Health Center for a fee. Maryland law now requires all students living 
in on-campus housing to be immunized against meningococcal 
disease (meningitis) or to sign a waiver stating they understand the 
risks of the disease and choose not to be immunized. 
Immunization/waiver forms for this vaccine will be sent with the 
Housing Contract and must be returned in order to move into 
residence halls. 

The Health Center will provide physical education exemptions 
and special residence arrangements only with adequate medical 
documentation from the student's personal physician. Please call 
for information and special forms. Medical parking permits are 
issued by the Auxiliary Services Business Office. Students must 
present documentation from the treating physician indicating the 
reason and estimated duration of the condition for which parking 
is being requested. 

Towson University Medical Excuse Policy 

The Health Center does not give medical excuses for short-term 
absence (less than five days) due to illness or injury. Verification of 
care will be given for people treated at the Health Center which 
does not constitute a medical excuse. For students whose medical 
condition results in longer-term absence, the Health Center notifies 
the vice president of Student Affairs, who then notifies the student's 
professors. However, this notification does not excuse the absence. 
Students must also contact their professors and make arrangements 
for makeup work. Letters of support for students requesting a med- 
ical withdrawal from all classes or a selective medical withdrawal 
from a single class are given at the discretion of the treating 
provider, and only if the student was treated at the Health Center 
for the condition. No medical information will be given to any 
professor or administrative office without written consent of the 
student. 

Treatment of athletic injuries is provided to intercollegiate ath- 
letes at the Towson Center Training Room by a staff of athletic 
trainers under the supervision of a board-certified orthopedic sur- 
geon or sports medicine physician. General medical care is provid- 
ed bv the Dowell Health Center. 



Health Insurance 

Dowell Health Center, 410-704-2466 

Although the Dowell Health Center offers high quality primary 
health care to any registered student, regardless of insurance sta- 
tus, there are times when students need medical services not avail- 
able at the Health Center. For this reason, all students are strongly 
encouraged to have health insurance coverage. International stu- 
dents, intercollegiate athletes and health professional students in 
the Nursing, Occupational Therapy and Physician Assistant pro- 
grams are required to have insurance. 

The university offers students an excellent 12-month health 
insurance policy at a very reasonable cost for the coverage. (See 
the current brochure on our Web site: www.towson.edu/dowellhealth- 
center for up-to-date premium information.) The plan uses the 
Dowell Health Center as the primary care provider while school 
is in session and covers services such as specialty referrals, diag- 
nostic tests, surgical procedures, and hospital care not available at 
the Health Center. It will cover urgent care and emergency servic- 
es at other facilities when the Health Center is closed or the stu- 
dent is away from school. Coverage for spouses and children of 
enrolled students is available. Policies can be purchased for the 
entire year (August 15 through August 14) for one term, or for 
summer only. 

International Student Insurance Requirement 

All international students on F and J visa status are required to 
have health insurance that meets the university's minimum stan- 
dards. These students are automatically enrolled in the university- 
sponsored insurance plan and the cost is billed to their financial 
account. Students with their own comparable insurance may sub- 
mit a waiver application, along with their plan benefits in English 
and proof of payment. If the waiver is approved, the insurance 
charge will be refunded. 

NOTE: Waiver deadlines for international students are 
September 15 (fall term), February 15 (spring term), and June 15 
(summer sessions). Waiver applications submitted after the dead- 
line will not be considered and no refunds of insurance premiums 
will be possible. Waiver applications must be re-submitted every 
fall term. See the Health Center Web site for waiver standards and 
application forms: www.towson.edu/dowellhealthcenter. For 
additional information, contact the Dowell Health Center. 

HOUSING AND RESIDENCE LIFE 
Newell Hall, Lower Level, 410-704-2516 

The Residence Life program provides living facilities for students 
and promotes educational programs and activities which support 
the academic mission of the university. The Residence Life staff 
and the University Residence Government strive to maintain an 
environment conducive to the individual's achievement of aca- 
demic goals and development of life skills. 

Housing and Residence Life offers a variety of living options to 
accommodate the diverse needs and interests of students. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT AND SCHOLAR OFFICE 

Administration Building 246, 410-704-2421 
Fax: 410-704-6040 
e-mail: isso@towson.edu 
www.towson.edu/isso 

The ISSO provides services to the approximately 800 internation- 
al students at Towson. These students represent about 100 differ- 
ent nations. Approximately 75 percent of international students 
are here for two to five years, working on an undergraduate or 
graduate degree. The ISSO also provides services for about 25 for- 
eign faculty, exchange scholars, and visiting faculty each year. 



Student Life and Campus Services 



The International Student and Scholar Office (ISSO) provides 
the following: 

• Documents and legal expertise that make possible the enroll- 
ment of nonimmigrant students 

• Advising services necessary for those international students to 
maintain legal status while in the United States, and to under- 
stand applicable federal government regulations and university 
policies 

• Programs that assist international students in their transition to 
life in the United States and provides them with tools for success 
in the American academic environment 

• Advising to students regarding personal, academic, legal, career, 
intercularal communication, and cross-cultural adiustment 
issues 

• Liaison to and advocacy for students with government agencies 
and university offices 

• Programs and ongoing services aimed at enhancing internation- 
al students' social life here, encouraging their interaction with 
American students and community members, and promoting 
ways that they can become involved and appreciated for their 
unique cultural perspectives 

• Coordination of appropriate services for international students 
in legal, medical and family emergency situations 

At the beginning of each term, the ISSO holds a two-day 
orientation program designed to assist new students by: 

• describing typical difficulties in the cross-cultural adjustment 
cycle (including culture shock) 

• suggesting tips for successful cross-cultural adjustment and 
effective intercultural communication 

• offering information about the university and the community 

• introducing key university service-providing offices 

• answering questions about settling into accommodations 

• suggesting preparations for success in the new academic envi- 
ronment 

• helping in the transition through the creation of a support net- 
work 

• offering opportunities to build friendships in the first week on 
campus 

The ISSO Inter>iatio?ial Ambassador Program invites students to 
( 1 ) volunteer their time at the beginning of each term to assist new 
students, (2) help the ISSO facilitate orientation programs, and (3) 
mentor new international students throughout their first year at 
TU. International and American students who are interested are 
encouraged to contact the office for an application. 

The ISSO coordinates other activities for international students 
throughout the year: 

• educational, cultural and social activities to foster interaction 
and improved appreciation among national/cultural groups and 
the Americans on campus 

• trips to the Baltimore Inner Harbor, MVA, and the Social 
Security Administration (for the new arrivals) 

• trips to Washington, New York, Philadelphia and/or Lancaster 
during term breaks 

• an International Festival and other culture-sharing programs 
each year, in cooperation with the student-led International 
Student Association 

International students are welcome to provide input on the 
activities offered. 

The office publishes ISSO News, a quarterly newsletter, and 
maintains an e-mail distribution list for all international students. 
We use these means to communicate pertinent immigration infor- 
mation, recreational offerings, job and travel opportunities, ISSO 
events and services, and other news for or about the international 
population on campus. Students who are not receiving ISSO News 
should submit an up-to-date local address through the university's 
online services. 

Most of the staff are available Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. 
to .S:30 p.m. Some scheduled in-person and phone appointments 



are available after 5 p.m. to students with urgent needs. Any stu- 
dent who has an emergency outside of normal business hours may 
contact the University Police at 410-704-2133. The police may 
assist or may contact an ISSO staff member at home. 

JUDICIAL AFFAIRS 

410-704-2057 

When a student is alleged to have violated the Code of Student 
Conduct (see Appendi.x F), this office interviews and counsels stu- 
dents in the discipline process and facilitates the student appeal 
process. The office also serves as a resource to faculty and admin- 
istrators. 

NATIONAL TESTING OFFICE 

Administration Building 232B 

410-704-3023 

Fax: 410-704-4699 

The National Testing Office provides a convenient testing site for 
Towson University students and individuals in the community who 
are required to take standardized exams. Examples of tests offered 
on an ongoing basis are: 

• AMP TESTS Various certification programs 

• GRE Graduate Record Examination 

• LSAT Law School Admission Test 

• MCAT Medical College Admission Test 

• PRAXIS Professional assessment for beginning teachers 

Special test administrations are also provided, upon request, to 
accommodate individuals with documented disabilities. 

Publications provided by the national testing companies listed 
above are available at the National Testing Office. This informa- 
tion includes test registration materials. 

NON-NATTVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH 

English Language Center 

7800 York Road, Room 206, 410-704-2552 

Fax: 410-704-2090 

The English Language Center offers intensive English instruction to 
students who are preparing for admission to the university or for 
international and permanent resident students who are admitted to 
the university and want to further develop their English skills. 
Courses are designed to develop a student's speaking, listening, 
reading and writing skills. A TOEFL preparation course and addi- 
tional courses on pronunciation, vocabulary development and 
American culture are also offered. A computer resource laboratory 
and a listening area are available for students who want to work on 
specific language areas, such as grammar, listening, reading or 
vocabulary development. The center also welcomes individuals 
who are not preparing for university study but who wish to 
improve their language skills for employment purposes. 

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) 
English Department, Linthicum Hall 218H, 410-704-2944 
The English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) testing coor- 
dinator tests and places non-native speakers of English admitted to 
the university in preparatory college writing courses. When neces- 
sary, students are placed in ESOL classes or special sections of 
Writing for a Liberal Education. 

OneCard - TU I.D. CARD 

University Union 118, 410-704-2284 
http://onecard.towson.edu 

The university issues a photo I.D. card to students, faculty and staff 
called the OneCard. The initial OneCard is free and does not have 
to be renewed. Students should keep the OneCard with them since 
it is necessary for using services at Cook Library, the Burdick 
Fitness Center and athletic facilities. The OneCard can also be 
used as a debit card. A Retail Points account, accessed through the 
OneCard can be used to purchase books, supplies and gift items at 



Student Life and Campus Services 



the University Store. A student can use the same Retail Points 
account on select vending machines, washers and drv'ers, Copies 
Plus, Health Center, and the Auxiliary Services Business Office. 
Additionally, the OneCard can be used for discount food purchases 
through use of a Dining Points account. Students save 5 percent on 
food purchased using Dining Points at all Dining Services locations 
including Paws. Students with a meal plan will use the card for 
access to the dining halls. .A student's Meal Plan account informa- 
tion can be accessed through the OneCard Web site. The OneCard 
p rovides access to some residence halls and academic labs. 
Students may also use the OneCard for complimentar>' access to 
many athletic and entertainment events. .Manage your OneCard 
account online at http://onecard.towson.edu. 

ORIENTATION AND NEW STUDENT PROGRAMS 
University Union 325, 410-704-2309 

All new first-year and transfer students attend an Orientation. The 
Office of Orientation and New Student Programs provides pro- 
gramming throughout the first term to help make your transition 
to Towson a smooth one. The program is specifically designed to 
meet the needs of newly admitted students from an academic and 
co-curricular perspective. 

College brings many new academic expectations. Orientation 
allows you to meet with facuin,- and staff to help ensure your aca- 
demic success. Your student Orientation leader will be a valuable 
resource during the program and throughout your first term. A 
strong co-curricular experience is key to your overall success at 
Towson. Orientation connects you with services and programs that 
can help you succeed. 

Orientation for all newly admitted freshmen takes place in late 
August just before the start of classes and leads directly into 
September Celebration. Each student is part of a First- Year 
Experience group that includes an academic adviser and an 
Orientation leader. Before attending Orientation, all freshmen are 
scheduled for one day in Juh' for the TU C.\RES I Campus Advising 
and Registration for Entering Students) program. This is a brief 
program that allows you to meet with an adviser to confirm your 
fall schedule and helps you take care of various forms of business, 
such as obtaining your TU OneCard (student I.D.I, updating your 
health immunization records, etc. You will receive information 
about your Orientation program at that time. 

New transfer students attend a one-day comprehensive 
Orientation in July. This program includes informational sessions 
about academic and student life, campus resources, academic 
advising and registration. 

PARKING 

Auxiliarv^ Services Business Office 
University Union 118, 410-704-2284 
http://parking.towson.edu 

The universitv" offers student parking on 13 lots and in three park- 
ing garages. The policy in effect when this catalog was published 
is that freshman-resident students are not eligible to park on cam- 
pus. There are a limited number of exceptions to this policy. View 
the parking Web site for more information on Resident-Freshman 
Student Exceptions. 

Additional information will be provided on the parking Web site 
by July. All other resident students may apply for a permit in one 
of three ways: online, by mail, or m person. We recommend pur- 
chasing parking permits online through the parking Web site or 
by mail to avoid waiting in line. Permits are also sold in person at 
the Auxiliarv- Services Business Office in the Universitv Union, 
Room 118. 

Free shunle buses are available for on-campus transportation 
from parking lots to all university buildings during the fall and 
spring terms. An escort service is provided from sunset to sunrise 
during the fall and spring terms. 

The universitv' provides special parking areas for motorcycles, 
which are subject to the same rules and regulations as other vehicles. 



For securit)' purposes, owners of soft-top vehicles are urged to 
purchase a window-sticker type permit in place of the hangtag. 

For additional information on parking, including a campus 
map, or to purchase a parking permit, visit the Web site. 

POST OFFICE 

University Union Ground Floor, 410-704-2260 
The Post Office provides window service from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. Resident students" mailboxes are at the 
Post Office, so they should make it a habit to stop by often. New 
resident students need to visit the Post Office soon after they move 
in to receive their mailbox combination. 

SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE 

Towson offers an on-campus shunle service during the fall and 
spring terms. The on-campus bus circles the campus, taking stu- 
dents between the classroom buildings and the parking lots. Visit 
our Web site: http://parking.towson.edu and click on the "on-cam- 
pus transponation services" link for current shuttle bus and mobil- 
itv- van information, including maps and hours of operation. 

SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING CLINIC 

\an Bokkelen Hall 001, 410-704-3095 

Diagnostic and therapeutic services of the Speech-Language- 
Hearing Clinic are available, without charge, to all members of the 
Towson facultv', staff and student body. Speech, hearing, and lan- 
guage evaluations for all ages and all ri'pes of communicative dis- 
orders and differences are available. Audiological services include 
complete hearing testing, central auditory processing testing, hear- 
ing aid evaluations and hearing aid dispensing. Audiologists eval- 
uate and fit conventional, programmable, and digital hearing aids 
and assistive listening devices, which can be purchased from the 
clinic. Appointments can be made by phoning 410-704-3095. 

Therapeutic services are provided for children and adults expe- 
riencing difficulty in comprehending and using oral communica- 
tion. Treatment is provided for the following tv'pes of communi- 
cation disorders and differences: language, articulation, cleft 
palate, stuttering, hard of hearing, auditoni- processing, voice and 
aphasia. Services are also available to improve comprehension and 
use of Standard American English. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCLVTION 

University Union 226, 410-704-2711 

The Student Government Association (SGA) recognizes more than 
100 clubs and organizations. These groups provide students with 
a varierv' of leadership opportunities and experiences, including 
academic groups, recreational sports, Greek organizations, honor 
societies, and cultural, ethnic and religious groups. SGA is the 
advocate of students, providing educational activities, social 
awareness and entertainment. 

Clubs and Organizations 

A complete list of Student Government Association clubs and 
organizations is available in the Office of Student Activities and 
also appears in the Student Handbook. For more information 
about involvement in clubs and organizations, contact the SGA or 
the Office of Student Activities. 

Students representing TU at events, conferences, or other official 
activities should obtain a Notification of Absence from Class Form 
from the Office of Campus Life, University Union, room 217, to 
be given to their instructors to verif\' the excused absence. Students 
are encouraged to notih' faculty of anticipated class absences as 
soon as they learn they will be missing class. 

STUDENT DAY CARE CENTER 

Lida Lee Tall, 410-704-2652 

E-mail: studentswithchildren@towson.edu 

The Student Day Care Center was established, and continues to be 

assisted financially, by the Student Government Association. The 



Student Life and Campus Services 



center provides developmental programming as well as good care 
for children ages 2 through 5. The center is open in conjunction 
with the university's academic calendar from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 
p.m. and offers children opportunities for physical, emotional and 
cognitive growth. 

Due to licensing restrictions, space is limited. The center accepts 
applications to its waiting list whenever parents are ready to sub- 
mit them, acceptmg children on a first-come, first-served basis, giv- 
ing priority to the children of full-time university students. Contact 
the center for further information. 

Students ivith Children 

The Students with Children organization was founded by students 
and parents at the Student Day Care Center to involve other stu- 
dent families on campus in events and activities, such as parenting 
discussions, used seasonal clothing sales, and the Scarecrow Party. 
The goal of the group is to expand the reach of the Student Day 
Care Center beyond the confines of the space available and the 
ages for which it is licensed. For more information, call Harriet 
Douthirt, 410-704-2652. 

TICKET OFFICE 

University Union, Ground Floor, 410-704-2244 
The Ticket Office provides the university community with a vari- 
ety of ticket services for both on-campus and area events. Tickets 
for student-sponsored events, including those offered by the 
Campus Activities Board (CAB) and Student Government 
Association (SGA), are sold through the Ticket Office, which is 
located on the first floor of the Universit)- Union. The Ticket Office 
is an outlet for Ticketmaster, selling tickets for attractions at the 
Baltimore Arena, Oriole Park at Camden Yards, and other venues. 
The Ticket Office also sells discounted movie passes and Mass 
Transit (bus and Light Rail) passes. 

UNIVERSITY STORE 

University Union, Ground Floor, 410-704-BOOK (2665) 

http://store.towson.edu 

The University Store carries all required and recommended text- 
books as well as a selection of general reading material including 
reference/study aids, current fiction and nonfiction, children's 
books, newspapers and magazines. Other products sold in the 
University Store include basic school/art supplies, computer sup- 
plies and software, film and film processing, health and beauty 
aids, snacks and beverages, gifts and greeting cards, music CDs, 
DVD movies and dry cleaning services. Official Towson University 
emblematic merchandise such as imprinted adult and children's 
apparel, stationery and giftware distinguish the University Store 
from other general retail outlets. The approved Towson University 
class ring is also available through the University Store. The store 
accepts VISA, MasterCard, Discover, OneCard Retail/Vending 
Points, personal checks with appropriate picture I.D., and cash. 
Visit the University Store Web site at http://store.towson.edu for 
information about textbooks, the Used Book Buy-back, refund 
policy, hours, caps and gowns, to order textbooks and TU mer- 
chandise, and to order textbooks online. 

UNIVERSITY UNION 

Information Desk, 410-704-4636 

The University Union is the hub of co-curricular activities and pro- 
grams for the campus, as well as home to a multitude of student 
services. Generally, the educational, cultural and social programs 
held in the Union are intended for the entire academic community. 
The Union is a place where students, faculty, staff and alumni can 
relax, interact, and share common interests and experiences. The 
following offices and services are located in the University Union: 
First floor — A full-service post office; a full-service Chevy Chase 
bank branch; the University Store; Paws, student center with bil- 
liards, food, entertainment and music, and a cyber cafe with made- 
to-order deli and grill items, gourmet coffee and pastries; the 
Auxiliary Services Business Office and the Auxiliary Services 



Administration suite; Art Ser\'ices; the Ticket Office; and the finan- 
cial operations office of Event and Conference Services. 

Second floor — The University Union Information Desk; the 
Susquehanna Food Court, a mall style eatery; the Patu.xent Grill, 
which offers high-qualirv- dining at reasonable prices; the Auxiliary 
Services program suite; the offices of the Student Government 
Association (SGA); the Office of Student Activities, which includes 
Commuter Affairs, Greek Life (fraternities and sororities), the 
Student Leadership Programs, and Off-Campus Housing 
Programs; the office of the Black Student Union; the Campus 
Ministries Office; the Office of Diversity Resources; the Potomac 
Lounge, a comfortable study and lounging spot; the Art Gallery; 
the offices of Event and Conference Services, where reservations for 
rooms and other campus facilities may be made and 
audiovisual/technical services requested; and the University Union 
office suite. 

Third floor — Orientation and New Student Programs; The 
Towerlight, Towson University's student newspaper; the African 
American Cultural Center; the Women's Center; the offices of the 
Students Achieve Goals through Education (SAGE) Program; the 
Queer Student Union; several multipurpose conference rooms; and 
a number of nooks and crannies for contemplation and conversation. 

VETERANS OFFICE 

Enrollment Services Center 233, 410-704-3094 

The office provides coordination between veteran/dependent stu- 
dents and the regional office of the Department of Veterans Affairs. 
The coordinator establishes procedures and prepares forms and 
correspondence for eligible students to receive educational benefits. 
Additionally, the officer monitors class attendance and evaluates 
academic progress to ensure that those receiving benefits maintain 
satisfactory progress. This officer also supervises the employment 
of VA work/study students. 

Students taking courses at other institutions concurrently with 
courses at Towson University may be certified for both institutions 
by the TU coordinator. 

Students may visit the office daily from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. but 
may wish to call for an appointment. 

The normal time for the Regional Office of the Veterans 
Administration to process an enrollment certification is six weeks. 
Certification is not automatic. The proper VA forms must be com- 
pleted each term. 

NOTE: Students cannot be certified for courses until they register. 

Withdrawals 

When students decrease unit load during the course of the term, 
they must notif\' the TU Veterans Office. Failure to do so could 
result in termination of benefits and a financial debt to the U.S. 
Department of Veterans Affairs. 

FX Grades 

Students who receive an FX at the end of a term should contact the 

university office immediately. 

Change of Program 

Veterans may change their academic program once without VA 
approval. For more than one change of program, however, veter- 
ans are required to undergo counseling by the Veterans 
Administration. A Change of Program Form must be filed whenev- 
er veterans make a curriculum change in which any of the courses 
for which VA benefits were previously received do not transfer into 
the new program or whenever students declare a new major or 
matriculate at a different institution. 

Independent Study 

Payment for independent study courses will generally be made on 
a tuition and fees basis only. Monthly rates may be paid for such 
courses, provided that more than half of the total number of units 



Academic Resources E 



for that term are in courses requiring class attendance. Check with 
the office to determine ehgibility to pay for independent study 
courses. 

Advance Payment 

Advance payment is the allowance for the first two months of an 
enrollment period. All tuition and fees are due according to regular 
university deadlines and cannot be deferred pending receipt of 
advance payment. Students may apply for advance pay only if they 
will be enrolling at the university on at least a half-time basis and 
meet established deadlines. There must be one full calendar month 
break between terms to apply for the advance. 

Students may request advance pay for the regular academic 
terms in writing on the Declaration of Intent Form. The student 
must be registered one month before the term commences to qual- 
ify for advance payment. 

Approved Program 

The VA will pay veterans only for the courses listed in the 
Undergraduate Catalog that are required for a degree and for pro- 
grams that have been approved for study by the Veterans 
Administration. If students take courses in addition to those listed 
for their approved program, they will not be entitled to receive VA 
benefits for them. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS 

410-704-2055 

The administrative responsibility for the supervision of the co-cur- 
ricular life of the university rests with the vice president for Student 
Affairs and staff. The university provides a wide range of support 
services and programs designed specifically to meet the outside-of- 
class and co-curricular needs of its students. Student Affairs direct- 
Iv supports the total educational experience of students. The oper- 
ating philosophy of Student Affairs rests upon the belief that 
outside-of-class activities and co-curncular learning complement 
the formal learning that takes place in the classroom and are part 
of the student's total education immersion. Efforts are made to 
ensure that services and programs are planned in such a way so as 
to be student centered and educational in nature. 

Student Affairs offers the student LIFE Line designed to assist 
students with any question they may have about the university. The 
LIFE Line is staffed and ready to assist callers Monday through 
Friday, 8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. After these hours, a voice-mail mes- 
sage can be left and will be responded to the next business day. 
Should students need to call, the number is 410-704-LIFE 
(x45433). In addition to the LIFE Line, Student Affairs has a gen- 
eral e-mail account where any question about the university can be 
directed. The e-mail address is: studentaffairs@towson.edu. All 
inquiries will be responded to promptly. 

WOMEN'S CENTER 

University Union 311, 410-704-2666 

The Women's Center is located on the third floor of the University 
Union and consists of a lounge, browsing library and office. The 
drop-in lounge is available to all for study, conversation or a 
moment of relaxation. 

A wide-ranging referral system offers information about campus 
and community groups and organizations, individuals with skills 
and expertise in specific areas, and individual professionals in the 
fields of medicine, law, mental health, etc. The center provides a 
bulletin board where job notices, conferences, and newsletters 
relating to women from all over the country are posted. 

Throughout the academic year, a variety of programs will be 
offered free of charge to the public. The center serves as an advo- 
cate and liaison for women students, staff and faculty. 



Academic Resources 

Towson offers its students many opportunities to enhance their 
lives with academic support and extracurricular activities. Some of 
these programs will help students with their studies, while others 
will provide cultural enrichment. 

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT CENTER 

Administration Building 234-235 

Phone: 410-704-2291 

Fax:410-704-3216 

Tern Massie-Burrell, Director 

The Academic Achievement Center (AAC) coordinates tutorial 
services, placement testing and study skills at Towson University. 
The AAC is a comprehensive undergraduate academic support pro- 
gram and university -wide resource serving the entire student popu- 
lation. Its mission is to teach the necessary skills and strategies to 
help students become successful and independent learners. We pro- 
vide student-centered tutoring services, placement testing for math- 
ematics, reading and writing, and supplemental educational oppor- 
tunities such as study skills workshops. 

Tutoring Services 

Peer tutoring support and strategic study skills are provided for 
Towson undergraduates. Tutoring is available mainly in small 
group sessions, for most lower-division and a select number of 
upper-division courses. Services are free of charge, available on a 
first-come, first-served basis and depend upon the availability of a 
qualified tutor. Students can request up to one hour of tutoring 
weekly per course. The tutor training program is internationally 
certified by the College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA) 
through level-3/Master tutor. 

Tutorial Support Network Services 

Tutoring at the AAC, Administration Building 235B 
Coordinator: Alicia Medina, 410-704-2291 

Provides drop-in and appointment-based tutoring to students 
enrolled in lower-division business, economics, modern language, 
and behavioral and social science courses. 

Computer Science Lab, 7800 York Road, Room 307 
Coordinator: Richard Webster, 410-704-2424 
Utilizes drop-in tutoring to assist students enrolled in computer 
science courses. 

Mathematics Lab, Stephens Hall 306 

Coordinator: Stefanie Hunt, 410-704-2418 

Assists students who are enrolled in lower-division and some 

upper-division mathematics courses via drop-in tutoring. 

Natural Sciences Lab, Smith Hall 538 
Coordinator: Liina Ladon, 410-704-3054 

Assists students who are enrolled in biology, chemistry, physical sci- 
ence and physics courses through drop-in tutoring, as well as com- 
puter-assisted instruction. 

Music Tutoring Lab, Center for the Arts 384 
Coordinator; Jonathan Leshnoff, 410-704-2845 
Provides tutoring for students enrolled in undergraduate music lit- 
erature, theory and musicianship courses. Tutors are matched with 
students to work individually on select, pre-determined topics. 



Academic Resources 



Study Skills Assistance 

Academic Success Strategies Workshops are offered each term and 
address the following topics: learning style preferences, goal set- 
ting, time management, listening, note-taking, textbook skills, 
memorization, testing skills, math anxiety, assessment of academ- 
ic performance and preparation for finals. Individual appoint- 
ments may be scheduled if necessary. Informal diagnostic aca- 
demic support is also available to any student who wishes to 
achieve a level of proficiency in fundamental knowledge and 
acquire necessary strategies for success in college. 

The AAC also provides supplemental computer-assisted instruc- 
tion in study skills. CASSI, a study strategies inventory, allows stu- 
dents to evaluate their study habits and attitudes in several areas 
including motivation, anxiety, information processing, selecting 
main ideas and test-taking. Enrichment strategies are recommend- 
ed after students complete CASSI. 

Placement Testing 

The AAC administers the competency testing. All entering fresh- 
men, both first-year and transfer, are required to demonstrate com- 
petence in the basic skills of reading, writing and mathematics. 

Minimum scores of 500 on the Math and/or Verbal sections of 
the SAT-I, minimum scores of 21 on the Math and/or Verbal sec- 
tions of the ACT, and some transfer courses may verify student 
competence in these skills. If students do not meet these require- 
ments, the appropriate sections of the Accuplacer test, published 
by The College Board, will be administered. The SAT-I and ACT 
scores must be officially submitted to Towson University's 
Admissions Office. 

Only those who need to be tested are contacted. For those stu- 
dents who are not exempt based on the above criteria, placement 
testing must be completed before the student attends TU CARES. 
Based on test results, the student may be placed into developmen- 
tal courses. Students who do not achieve minimum proficiency 
(i.e., fail to achieve a minimum grade of S or C) in any develop- 
mental course requirement are subject to a review of academic 
records and mandatory advising. 

If you have not received notification of testing and are not 
exempt based on the above criteria, or if you have questions con- 
cerning the placement testing program, please contact the AAC at 
the number above. 

OTHER TUTORING SERVICES 

Writing Lab 

Lida Lee Tall 308 

410-704-3426 

Provides tutoring for writers at all stages of the writing process 

and in all courses within the university. 

Writing Support Program 

Linthicum 20 IB 

410-704-2857 

Assists students with sentence-level and grammar skills (ENGL 

251/ENGL350). This service is for native English speakers. 

Computer Lab 
Linthicum Hall, room 207 
410-704-3834 

Provides computer software for writing skills analysis/improve- 
ment. This service is for native English speakers. 

ESOL Writing Services 
Administration Building 216F 
410-704-5016 

Assists students, for whom English is a second language, with sen- 
tence-level and paragraph/essay-level skills. 



Online Writing Support 

www.towson.edu/ows 

Linthicum 201B 

410-704-2857 

Provides online assistance and interactive exercises for grammar 

and punctuation skills. 

ACADEMIC ADVISING 

Lecture Hall, 410-704-2472 

This office coordinates all undergraduate academic advising, 
including services offered by the Academic Advising Center and the 
Department of New Student Registration. Towson University is 
committed to providing comprehensive advising designed to enrich 
the educational experiences of every student. Towson offers a 
unique advising program for freshmen called the First Year 
Experience, and a similar program for newly admitted transfer stu- 
dents called the TRANS-AM Program. Both of these programs are 
coordinated through the Academic Advising Center. All students 
are encouraged to seek advising at any time during the academic 
year. Students who have chosen a major should go to the appro- 
priate academic department to be assigned a faculty adviser. 

Academic Advising Center 
Lecture Hall, 410-704-2472 
Lynne Dowell, Director 

The Academic Advising Center supports the advising needs of the 
university's students and faculty. This center serves as a clearing- 
house for information about the university's policies, procedures 
and requirements. Its advisers help students review their progress 
toward the fulfillment of GenEd requirements and advise students 
about developing academic goals, planning programs, selecting 
courses, investigating majors and minors, clarifying catalog year 
choices, and meeting standards. Students who have completed 75 
units receive an audit of their progress toward graduation. In addi- 
tion, the center advisers conduct special advising for students who 
have received academic warnings or who are on academic proba- 
tion. Students who have questions or concerns prior to meeting 
with their faculty adviser can meet with trained peers through the 
Student Academic Advising Program, Lecture Hall, 410-704-3497. 

New Student Registration 
Lecture Hall, 410-704-2472 

As new freshmen matriculate at Towson University, they work with 
the Office of New Student Registration to select courses to meet 
their goals and interests. Professional advisers coordinate the first 
term's course schedules with mformation supplied to New Student 
Registration by the student. New students meet with professional 
and faculty advisers during TU CARES, a one-day summer advis- 
ing program, to confirm their schedules. 

The First-Year Experience is a unique advising program for 
freshmen which pairs incoming students with a faculty member or 
professional adviser who has received special training in the 
Faculty Institute. Together, advisers and students work throughout 
the first year to orient the new college student to the university and 
to identify and use resources that will enhance the student's educa- 
tional experience. The relationship between the FYE adviser and 
the new student helps develop successful, active members of the 
university community who are able to make effective educational 
decisions. 

Following the First- Year Experience, students who have chosen 
a major will be advised by faculty advisers within the ma|or depart- 
ment. Students who are still exploring their choice of major will be 
re-assigned to the professional advisers within the Academic 
Advising Center. 

Transfer students are assigned to professional advisers or faculty 
members for the one-term TRANS-AM (Transfer Advising and 
Mentoring) Program specially designed to meet the needs of expe- 
rienced students in a new environment. 



Academic Resources W 



CENTER FOR INSTRUCTIONAL ADVANCEMENT 
AND TECHNOLOGY (CIAT) 
Cook Library 405, 410-704-2005 

The Center for Instructional Advancement and Technology (CIAT) 
supports excellence in teaching and learning by providing Towson 
University faculty the opportunity to investigate and apply sound 
learning theory and technology to instruction. The CIAT staff 
works with faculty to design curriculum and courses; develop 
course materials; implement teaching and learning strategies; and 
to identify and use appropriate technology applications that apply 
to teaching and learning. The three supporting functions of CIAT 
are: instructional design, technology support and multimedia appli- 
cations. 

OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY SERVICES 
Help Center, Cook Library 5, 410-704-5151 
E-mail: helpcenter@towson.edu 
www.towson.edu/ots 

Through the cooperative efforts of several campus technology 
service departments, Towson University provides computing sup- 
port for all university students, faculty and staff. The Help Center 
is the best source of information on available campus computing 
resources and a single point of contact for questions relating to 
e-mail, Web access, computing labs, networked classrooms, train- 
ing and telecommunications. Help Center hours of operation are 
Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.; Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.; 
Saturday, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.; and Sunday, noon - 8 p.m. 

If the best solution to a problem involves training or consulting, 
the Help Center may refer students to Student Computing Services 
(SCS), which operates the General PC Lab and the Student 
Computing Learning Center in Cook Library, room 35. SCS pro- 
vides access to the Web and standard Microsoft applications 
(PowerPoint, FrontPage, Word, Excel, Access, etc.) as well as train- 
ing and collaborative workspaces. For more information, visit 
ww^'.towson.edu/scs. 

FE^JEARTS 

Towson University, a center for the fine and performing arts in the 
Baltimore area, offers students a host of programs and concerts, 
many free of charge. In addition, Towson is home to the Maryland 
Arts Festival, an array of live theater, concerts, films, lectures and 
musicals. 

Art Galleries 

Asian Arts & Culture Center, Center for the Arts 2038 

410-704-2807 

www.towson.edu/asianart5 

The Asian Arts & Culture Center at Towson University promotes 
the art and culture of Asia through outstanding programming 
designed to benefit students, faculty, artists, the local community, 
and the state of Maryland. 

To make art an integral part of every student's education, the 
Asian Arts & Culture Center's activities include art exhibitions, 
concerts, lectures, films, workshops and demonstrations that are 
available to students and the public throughout the year 

The Asian Arts Gallery exhibits are used by many faculty mem- 
bers as part of their teaching programs. To students of Asian art 
history, philosophy, history and language, a visit to the gallery pro- 
vides an opponunity to gain direct contact with art objects and a 
deeper understanding of the culture they are studying. For those 
taking studio an courses, the gallery is a place to explore different 
techniques and develop esthetic sensibilities. Local schools, 
libraries and service organizations may borrow selected items from 
the collections for their educational programs. 



Holtzman Art Gallery, Center for the Arts 

M.F.A. Project Space, Center for the Arts 

Towson Commons Gallery, York Rd. 

University Union Art Gallery, University Union, Second Floor 

The galleries present a variety of exhibitions to the Towson com- 
munity and metropolitan region, including student and faculty 
exhibitions as well as national and international exhibitions. The 
Holtzman Art Gallery emphasizes contemporary art by national 
and international artists; the new M.F.A. Project Space will focus 
on thesis exhibitions and exhibitions that pertain to the M.F.A. 
program; the Towson Commons Gallery hosts student and faculty 
exhibitions; while the University Union Gallery features works by 
regional and national artists. 

Lieberman Collection, Honors College 
Lecture Hall, Lieberman Room 

The Lieberman Collection of 40 oil paintings, sculptures, ink draw- 
ings, lithographs, photographs and art books was donated to 
Towson University by Dr. and Mrs. Sidney Lieberman in memory 
of their sons. The collection is on display in the Lieberman Room, 
located in the Lecture Hall. Used primarily by students in the 
Honors College as a quiet place to read or study, the room is open 
to the public during the university's normal hours. 

Dance 

The TU Dance Company is considered one of the premier university 
dance companies in the mid-Atlantic region. The company presents 
annual concerts and regularly performs works by internationally 
and nationally recognized choreographers, as well as classical bal- 
lets. The Department of Dance produces the faculty-alumni con- 
cert, dance majors performance project, and Sigma Rho annual 
dance showcase. 

Film 

The TU Film and Video Society offers a free film series during the 
fall and spring terms. Sponsored by the Department of Electronic 
Media and Film, the films are screened in Van Bokkelen 
Auditorium. 

Music 

The Department of Music's instrumental and vocal ensembles — 
including LIniversity Chorale, Vocal Jazz Ensemble, Choral Society, 
Orchestra, Symphonic Band, Percussion Ensemble, Woodwind 
Ensemble, Brass Ensemble, Guitar Ensemble, Jazz Ensembles (large 
and small). Commercial Ensemble, Chamber Ensembles and Early 
Music Ensemble — present more than 50 concerts each year in the 
Harold J. Kaplan Concert Hall at Towson's Center for the Arts. 
Many concerts are free of charge; others offer discounts to students 
and faculty. 

Theatre 

Towson presents many productions each year in one of four cam- 
pus theatres and other local venues. Occasionally our M.F.A. pro- 
gram performs at the Baltimore Theatre Project. The productions 
range from Shakespeare to musicals to new experimental perform- 
ances, featuring Towson theatre majors, and talented students from 
other disciplines. The price for each production varies, but stu- 
dents pay a discount rate. 



Academic Resources 



INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

Office of International Programs 

Administration Building, Second Floor 

410-704-2919 

Fax: 410-704-4646 

E-Mail: inteniationaleducation@towson.edu 

www.towson.edu/intledu 

Dean Esslinger, Associate Vice President, International Programs 

Elizabeth T. Lambert, Director, International Financial Services 

G. Frank Mullen, Director of Special Projects 

International Programs is the central academic office for the coor- 
dination and supervision of the universir\'s international programs 
and activities. It plays an important role in the university's mission 
to internationalize the campus community. The office coordinates 
faculty and student exchange programs with numerous partner 
institutions in a variety of foreign countries. It oversees the func- 
tions and policies of the International Student and Scholar Office, 
the International Undergraduate Admissions Office, the English 
Language Center, the Summer in Maryland Program for interna- 
tional students and the Study Abroad Office. It seeks to promote 
better understanding of international and cross-cultural issues 
within the context of education to the university and external com- 
munity, including schools, businesses, local government and the 
University System of Maryland. 

One such initiative is the Maryland International Education 
Association (MIEA). MIEA membership comprises two-year and 
four-year higher education institutions across the state of 
Maryland. It provides a statewide platform for nerworking 
between Maryland faculty and university administrators con- 
cerned with international issues. The mission of MIEA is to serve 
as a forum to discuss and plan modes of cooperation and to pro- 
vide opportunities for sharing resources and organizing activities 
throughout the state. MIEA organizes a broad range of programs 
serving the goal of coordinating the response of higher education 
to the global challenges of the 21st century. 

In its commitment to internationalization, the International 
Programs Office provides a variety of ser\'ices to international stu- 
dents and scholars, to the universiry student body, faculty and 
staff, and to the community. It also provides consultation and 
referral support to other academic departments, local government 
offices, and businesses. 

To obtain specific information about any of the international 
programs and services available through Towson University, con- 
tact the International Programs Office or one of the offices listed 
below. For the names and locations of TU's international exchange 
partner institutions, refer to the Study .Abroad section in this cata- 
log, under University Curriculum. 

Contact Information 

Asian Arts & Culture Center 

Location: Center for the Arts 

Contact: Suevvhei Shieh, Director 

Tel; 410-704-2807, Fax: 410-704-4032 

E-mail: sshieh@towson.edu 

Web site: www.towson.edu/tu/asianarts 

English Language Center 

Location: 7800 York Road 
Contact: Lynda .Vlermell, Director 
Tel: 410-704-2552. Fax: 410-704-2090 
E-mail: lmermell@towson.edu 
Web site: www.towson.edu/elc 

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) 

Location: English Department, Linthicum Hall, 2ISH 

Contact: James Cook, Director 

Tel: 410-704-2944, Fax: 410-704-3999 

E-mail: icook@towson.edu 



ESOL Writing Services 

Location: Administration Building, Second Floor 
Contact: Carol Pippen, Director 
Tel: 410-704-5016, Fax: 410-704-3999 
E-mail: cpippen@towson.edu 

Faculty Exchanges 

Location: .\dministration Building, Second Floor 

Contact: Dean Esslinger, 

Associate Vice President for International Programs 

Tel: 410-704-2919, Fax: 410-704-4646 

Web site: www.towson.edu/intledu 

Institute for Korean-U.S. Business Relations 
Location: Administration Building, Second Floor 
Contact: Bong Shin, Director 
Tel: 410-704-5266, Fax: 410-704-4646 
E-mail: bshin@towson.edu 

International Development 

Location; Admmistration Building, Second Floor 
Contact: Liz Todd Lambert, Director, 
International Financial Services 
Tel: 410-704-5416, Fax: 410-704-2090 
E-mail: elambert@towson.edu 

International Exchange Student Program 

Location: Administration Building, Second Floor 
Contact: Franklin G. Mullen, Director 
Tel: 410-704-4327, Fax: 410-704-4646 
E-mail: fmullen@towson.edu 
Web site: wwfw.towson.edu/intledu 

International Student and Scholar Office 

Location: Administration Building, Suite 246 

Contact: Janene Oettel, Director 

Tel: 410-704-2421, Fax: 410-704-6040 

E-mail: isso@towson.edu 

Web site: www.towson.edu/isso 

International Studies Program 

Location: Linthicum Hall 118N 

Contact; James Roberts, Director 

Tel: 410-^04-2958, Fax: 410-704-2960 

E-mail: inst@towson.edu 

Web site: www.towson.edu/polsci/inst 

International Undergraduate Admissions 

Location: Administration Building, Second Floor 

Contact: jeffrev Haas, Director 

Tel: 410-''04-6'069, Fax: 410-704-60"0 

E-mail; intladm@towson.edu 

Web site; www.towson.edu/intladm 

Maryland International Education Association (MIEA) 
Location; Administration Building, Second Floor 
Contact; Dean Esslinger, President 
Tel; 410-704-2919, Fax; 410-704-4646 
E-mail: desslinger@towson.edu 
Web site: www.towson.edu/miea 

Multicultural Institute 

Location: .Administration Building, Second Floor 

Contact: [oanna Basurav, Director 

Tel; 410-704-3931, Faxi 410-704-6093 

E-mail: ibasuray@towson.cdu 

Web site: w^vw. towson. edii/imi I ticu I tur.i I institute 



Housing and Residence Life 



Study Abroad Office 

Location: Administration Building, Second Floor 

Contact: Adam Grotsky, Director 

Tel: 410-704-2451, Fax: 410-704-4703 

E-mail: studyabroad@to\vson.edu 

Web site: w-\\"iv.towson.edu/studvabroad 



Housing and Residence Life 



OFFICE 

Newell Hall, 410-704-2516 
Jerry Dieringer, Director 



Summer in Maryland Program (for international students) 

Location: 7800 York Road 

Contact: Lvnda Mermell, Coordinator 

Tel: 410--64-6080, Fax: 410-"'04-5527 

E-mail: lmermell@towson.edu 

Web site: www.towson.edu/sim 

Towson-Oldenburg Exchange Program 
Location: Administration Building. Second Floor 
Contact: Armin Mruck, Adviser 
Tel: 410-^04-2919, Fax: 410-704-4646 
E-mail: amruck@towson.edu 

LffiRARY/MEDLA SERVICES 

Albert S. Cook Library 
410-704-2461 

The Albert S. Cook Library, located near the center of Towson 
University's campus, serves as the university's hub of information 
resources. The library's collection of nearly 574,096 volumes, 
868,000 microforms, and more than 4,000 print and electronic 
periodicals has been selected to support Towson's academic cur- 
riculum. More than SO online databases offer students and faculty 
members access (from on-campus and remote locations) to journal 
article citations, statistics, business data, news, legal information 
and increasingly, full-text articles. 

The Media Resources Ser\'ices Lab, complete with listening and 
viewing stations, offers approximately 15,870 films, videos, DVDs, 
recorded satellite resources, video conferences, cassettes, compact 
disks, and CD-ROMs. Cook Librar)' is a depositor}- for Maryland 
state documents, owns a notable collection in education and has 
special holdings in early English Literature, early American period- 
icals, and in the field of women's studies. 

The online catalog accesses Cook Library's entire collection as 
well as the collections of the other University' System of Maryland 
libraries. Cooperative borrowing and document delivery agree- 
ments among USM schools ensure that materials can be shared. 
Reference librarians help patrons navigate the extensive array of 
information resources. 

Whether at the reference desk, in the classroom, or by appoint- 
ment. Cook Library- reference service is tailored to meet the needs 
of individual library users and is aimed at enabling them to locate, 
evaluate, and use print and elearonic information resources 
effectivelv. 



HOUSING AND RESIDENCE LIFE 

Housing and Residence Life provides living facilities for full-time 
degree candidates and promotes educational programs and activi- 
ties that support the universir\-'s academic mission. The Housing 
and Residence Life staff and the University Residence Government 
strive to maintain an environment that encourages academic excel- 
lence, community responsibility and individual development. 

Towson University offers on-campus housing for approximately 
3,800 students. 

• Resident students must sign a contract for university housing, 
renewable at the option of the university, and must carry a 
minimum of 12 units. Priority is given to undergraduate stu- 
dents. 

• Residents must vacate the residence halls after they complete 
their final term examination. 

• Housing facilities are available to students only when classes 
are in session. Some special interest programs are open year- 
round. 

• The Housing and Residence Life staff offers assistance and 
programs for resident students. 

• A number of special living options are available, including 
alcohol-free areas, special quiet options, honors housing and 
the International House. All buildings are non-smoking. 

University Housing 

Glen Complex 

Connected to the rest of the campus by a bridge that crosses over 
the Glen, this complex includes four high-rise buildings housing 
about 425 students each. All student accommodations are suites, 
with two rooms sharing a bath. There is a lounge area on each 
floor and a centrally located dining hall in the complex. 

Newell Hall 

Completely renovated in 1997, Newell was the first residence 
hall built on campus. It houses 211 students with a number of hon- 
ors students. 

Prettyman and Scarborough Halls 

These low-rise residence halls enclose a garden courtyard and 
house approximately 160 students each. 

Residence Tower 

This 13-story, high-rise residence hall accommodates approxi- 
mately 455 students in double and single rooms. There is a lounge 
area, study room and kitchen on each floor, and a recreation room 
and laundry facility on the lower level of the building. The 
Residence Tower accommodates students requesting the 
International House. Both nine- and 12-month housing options are 
available for international students. 



Richmond Hall 

Designated as the university's honors residence hall, Richmond 
houses 107 students. Richmond was one of the first residence halls 
built on campus. It was completely renovated in 1998. 

Towson Run Apartments 

These one-, nvo-, and four-bedroom apartments for upper-level 
undergraduate students are fully furnished. In addition to double 
bedrooms, each apartment has a full kitchen and living/dining 
room. Approximately 420 students are housed at Towson Run. 
Nine-month housing is available. For students electing this option, 
the apartments are open during term breaks. 



Expenses 



Ward and West Halls 

These twin low-rise residence halls for men and women accom- 
modate about 60 students each. A large study area is located on 
the lower level of each building. 

On-Campus Apartments 

Burkshire at Towson University 
10 W. Burke Avenue 
410-324-8108 

University-owned and located on campus at the corner of York 
Road and Burke Avenue, the Burkshire offers one bedroom, one 
bedroom with den, and two bedroom with den apartments featur- 
ing a full kitchen, washer and dryer, air conditioning, cable TV, 
and free storage locker. The Burkshire's apartments are available 
to students who are juniors with a 2.85 GPA or above, seniors, 
graduate students, married students, students 23 years or older, 
and faculty and staff. The Burkshire is a good choice for students 
interested in a quiet nontraditional housing alternative. 

Millennium Hall 
Capstone Properties 
8000 York Road 
443-275-4000 

Millennium Hall, Towson Universit\''s five-story residence build- 
ing, offers housing for 408 sophomores, juniors and seniors in 
four-bedroom furnished apartments. Owned and managed by 
Capstone Properties, the building is Towson's first privatized resi- 
dence hall. Each four-bedroom apartment accommodates four stu- 
dents and is fully furnished, with a living/dining room and full 
kitchen. Each bedroom has a telephone jack, cable TV, and com- 
puter connection. The building is air-conditioned and has a laun- 
dry room on the first floor. All inquiries should be directed to 
Millennium Hall. 



Expenses 




Expenses are estimates at the time of printing this catalog and are 
subject to revision. NOTE: Notwithstanding any other provision of 
this or any other universit)- publication, the universit\' reserves the 
right to make changes in tuition, fees, housing and boarding costs, 
and other charges at any time such changes are deemed necessary 
by the university and the University System of Maryland Board of 
Regents. 

APPLICATION AND ENROLLMENT FEES 

Each applicant must pay a nonrefundable application fee of $45 for 
fall 2005. No application will be processed without this fee or a 
valid waiver. 

Once students are admined for fall 2005, a nonrefundable $300 
enrollment fee must be forwarded to the Office of Admissions to 
reserve a place in the class. 

TUITION 

The University System of Maryland Tuition Policy, approved by the 
Board of Regents on June 1 1, 1993, established non-resident tuition 
at the calculated actual educational cost at each institution within 
the system and based the increase in the non-resident tuition and 
fees on that cost. Additionally, the policy recommends each institu- 
tion to provide a four-year plan of tuition and fees for both resident 
and non-Maryland resident students. The two charges — Maryland 
resident and non-Maryland resident — shown below, provide the 
projected, per term rates for fail 2005 through fall 2008. 

The tuition and fee increases for the next three years are based 
on fall 2005 rates. They do not include increases related to infla- 
tion and other cost factors not known at this time. 
The tuition policy is available for review in the following offices: 

• All academic departments 

• Office of the Bursar 

• English Language Center 

• College of Graduate Studies and Research 

• International Student and Scholar Office 

• Office of the Registrar 



MARYLAND RESIDENTS 




Projected (Subject to Change) 


Tuition and 
Mandatory Univ. Fees 
(Per Term) 


Fall 2005 


Fall 2006 


Fail 200-' 


Fall 2008 


Full-Time 

Llndergraduate 
(12 units or greater) 
Tuition 

Mandatory Univ. Fees 
Total 


S3548/term 


S_^-'22/tcrm 


S3904/terni 


S4096/tcrm 


P.irt-Timc 
Undergraduate 
(Fewer than 12 units) 
Tuition 

M.indatorv Univ. Fees 
lotal 


S2')')/unit 


S314/unit 


S329/unit 


S34s/unit 


Graduate 

Tuition 

M.mJatorv Univ. Fees 
Total 


S342/unit 


SViy/unit 


S376/unit 


S395/unit 



Expenses 



NON-MARYLAND RESIDENTS 




Projected (Subject to Change) 


Tuition and 
Mandatory Univ. Fees 
(Per Term) 


Fall 2005 


Fall 2006 


Fall 2007 


Fall 2008 


Full-Time 

Undergraduate 

(12 units or greater) 

Tuition 

Mandatory Univ. Fees 

Total 


S8015/term 


S8333/term 


S8663/tcrm 


S9007/term 


Part-Time 

Undergraduate 
(Fewer than 12 units) 
Tuition 

Mandatory Univ. Fees 
Total 


S602/unit 


S632/unit 


S663/unit 


S696/unit 


Graduate 

Tuition 

Mandatory Univ. Fees 

Total 


S635/unit 


S660/unit 


S686/unit 


S714/unit 



MANDATORY UNIVERSITY FEES 

A comprehensive Mandatory University Fee is charged to each stu- 
dent each term. This fee varies based on a student's tuition classi- 
fication as indicated on the chart below. The fee supports student 
activities, athletics, university-funded construction and transporta- 
tion. 

TECHNOLOGY FEE 

It is the university's goal to create a student-centered learning 
infrastructure that recognizes how technology is changing the 
methods for organizing and disseminating information, delivering 
student services and administering the educational enterprise. The 
Technology Fee is charged to each student each term and varies 
based on a student's tuition classification as indicated on the chart 
below. The fee is assessed as a $72 flat fee for 12 or more units and 
$6 up to 12 units. 

OVERLOAD SURCHARGE FEE 

A $40 Overload Sucharge Fee will be assessed per unit for all units 
over 15 per term. 

STUDENT CLASSIFICATION FEE 

The $200 Student Classification Fee is assessed one time to all 
degree candidates who have attained junior standing. The revenues 
from this fee are generally returned to the student's major depart- 
ment to enhance instructional equipment and facilities. 



TUITION AND FEES PER TERM 

NOTE: Notwithstanding any other provision of this or any other university publication, the university reserves the right to make changes in 
tuition, fees, and other charges at any time such changes are deemed necessary by the university' and the University' System of Maryland Board 
of Regents. 



Registration 


Residence Status 


Tuition "^ 


Mandatory University Fee 


Technology Fee** 


Surcharge 


Overload Fee*** 


Undergraduate Part-time 
Fewer than 12 units 
Fewer than 12 units 
Up to 12 units 
12 units or more 


In-State 
Out-of-State 


$225/unit 
$528/unit 


$68/unit 
$68/unit 


Plus Tech Fee 
Plus Tech Fee 
$6/unit 
$72 flat 




Undergraduate Full-time 

12 or more units 
12 or more units 


In-State 
Out-of-State 


$2,590 flat 
$7,057 flat 


$886 flat 

$886 flat 


$72 flat 
$-^2 flat 


$40/unit 
$40/unit 


Graduate 

Less than 10 units 
10 units or more 


In-State 
Out-of-State 


$267/unit 
$560/unit 


$69/umt 
$69/unit 


Plus Tech Fee 
Plus Tech Fee 
$6/unit 
$72 flat 





* Refer to Appendix C for tuition residency qualifications. 

** A Technology Fee is assessed at $6 per unit for less than 10 units, and a $72 flat fee for 12 or more units. 

*** An Overload Surcharge Fee is assessed per unit for units over 15. 



Expenses 



OTHER FEES AND EXPENSES 

TEXTBOOKS 

Students are expected to buy the textbooks for their courses. The 
average cost for textbooks is $400 per term. Books and other sup- 
pHes may be purchased at the University Store. 

CENTER FOR APPLIED INFORMATION 
TECHNOLOGY (AIT COURSES) 

AIT rates differ from university rates. For details see the CAIT 
Web site, www.towson.edu/cait. 

PDS/STUDENT TEACHING/CLINICAL PRACTICUM FEES 

Students enrolled in PDS internship, student teaching or a clinical 
practicum are charged a fee ranging from $300 to $700 per expe- 
rience. Students must confer with their department chair or with 
the director of the GPP office in the College of Education to deter- 
mine the exact fee. These courses are designated PRC, STT and 
CIN. 

PRTVATE MUSIC LESSON FEES 

Students enrolled in private music lessons are charged a fee of $100 
or $260 per unit, depending upon course registration. 

STUDY ABROAD FEES 

Fees for the academic year 2005-2006 have not yet been approved. 
For your budgeting purposes only, the following are last year's 
rates. Please anticipate that the fees will be higher this academic 
year. 

A fee of $120 for the fall and spring terms, $60 for summer, and 
$50 for Minimester is assessed for Study Abroad programs. 

PARKING FEES 

All students are required to register their automobiles with the uni- 
versit)' in order to obtain a parking permit. Parking permits do not 
guarantee a space on campus; however, permits are required to 
park at any universit)' parking lot or garage. Resident-freshmen are 
not permitted to purchase parking permits. There are limited 
exceptions to this policy. Information about parking policies is 
available on the parking Web site and at TU CARES, the university's 
advising and registration program for new first-year and transfer 
students. 

Parking permits are available on a first-come, first-served basis 
and may be purchased over the Towson University Web page, 
hnp://parking.towson.edu. Campus maps and other parking-relat- 
ed information are also available at this Web site. In addition, 
parking permits may be purchased from the Auxiliary Services 
Business Office, University- Union, room 118. Student parking per- 
mits go on sale in early August 2005 and in early December 2005 
for spring term permits. For questions or additional information, 
please view the Web page listed above. 

Parking Fee Schedule for Academic Year 2005-2006 

• Evenmg permit (after 3 p.m., only M-F) 

- Annual $75 

- Term (fall/minimester or spring/summer) $48 

• All-day permit 

- Annual $212 

- Term (fall/minimester or spring/summer) $122 

- Summer 2005 $433 

- Day passes $4/day 

HOUSING AND DINING FEES 

Students interested in living on campus must make a $225 non- 
refundable housing deposit by the established procedures and meet 
all deadlines. Failure to pay all room and board charges may result 
in forfeiture of residence hall space. 

Depending upon the room and meal plan selected, students living 
on campus pay approximately $3,560 per term for room and meal 
plan. 



For those students who enter universit)' housing after the begin- 
ning of a term, the charge will be prorated for the remainder of the 
term. (For exact rates, contact Housing and Residence Life.) 

For the 2005-2006 academic year, resident students can choose 
from traditional all-you-can-eat weekly meal plans. Plans will 
range in size from 19 to 10 meals per week. Estimated cost will 
range from approximately $1,785 to $1,330 per term. All plans 
offer a choice of both kosher and standard menu items. An addi- 
tional choice is the Unrestricted xVIeal Plan, which offers students 
the option of eating at any time and as often as they desire. Pricing 
is a little higher on this option, but it gives students complete flex- 
ibility to use meals at any time during the week. 

Students living off-campus and at the Burkshire, Millennium 
Hall or Towson Run Apartments are not required to have a meal 
plan but may select any of the plans listed above, or may choose 
one of the Block Meal Plans which offer a specific number of meals 
per week each term at a fixed price. 

Prices are subject to change. 

HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN FOR U.S. CITIZENS 

A voluntary health insurance plan designed especially for Towson 
University students is offered at a very reasonable cost. All stu- 
dents on intercollegiate athletic teams and health professions stu- 
dents (nursing, occupational therapy and physician assistant pro- 
grams) are required to have health insurance. However, we strongly 
recommend that all students have health insurance to avoid the 
expense of large, unexpected medical bills. The school-sponsored 
plan is an excellent value chat should be considered by any student 
needing insurance. It provides primary care services through the 
university's Dowell Health Center as well as coverage for hospital- 
ization, emergency care, diagnostic tests and referrals to a large net- 
work of participating specialists. Billing statements will not reflect 
the cost of the insurance. Enrollment is handled directly through 
the insurance company. Should a student withdraw from the uni- 
versit)' after 31 days or more of active class attendance, coverage 
will remain intact for the policy year. Any questions regarding cov- 
erage should be directed to the Dowell Health Center, 
410-704-4011. See Insurance under Health Services, Student Life 
and Campus Services or visit the Health Center Web site, 
www.towson.edu/dowellhealthcenter. 

MANDATORY HEALTH INSURANCE POLICY FOR 
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

International students with an F or J visa type are automatically 
enrolled in the university-sponsored health insurance plan. The 
insurance charge will be reflected on your financial account. 
Although this insurance is mandatory, students with their own 
insurance who want an exemption (waiver) from the school plan 
must submit a waiver application as soon as they arrive at Towson 
with proof of insurance coverage that meets the university's mini- 
mum standards. Applications for a waiver must be submitted to 
the Dowell Health Center by the waiver deadline of the student's 
first term at Towson and each fall term thereafter. For information 
about the school-sponsored insurance, Towson's mandatory insur- 
ance policy for international students, or waiver applications, call 
Dowell Health Center, 410-704-2466 or visit the Web site, 
www.towson.edu/dowellhealthcenter. 

BURSAR FEES 

A $75 late fee is assessed to any student who pays after published 
bill deadlines. Payment of term bill secures your class schedule for 
a term; otherwise, cancellation of your class schedule may occur. 
You may pay by either returning the top portion of your billing 
statement to the Bursar's Office, Enrollment Services Center, room 
336, with payment or verification of funds to cover 
all charges or through Towson Universit)-'s Web application 
http://students.towson.edu, click on Online Services. To use: click 
Online Services; click SA Self-Service; click Learner Services; click 
Finances; click Make a Payment. Your TU username and password 



Expenses 



are required to make a payment on the Web. Note: Bank check 
card or debit card payments cannot be processed through the Web 
payment site. If the Web payment option is selected, full payment 
is required. 

If your term bill reflects a credit or zero balance and you choose 
NOT to attend the upcoming term, you must notify the Registrar's 
Office on or before the bill payment due date to have your class 
schedule cancelled. If you fail to do this, you will be financially 
responsible for all term charges. 

A $10 Archived Records Research Fee will be assessed when 
financial detail involving archived records is requested. 

A $50 penalty fee is assessed when a check given in payment of 
fees, fines or services is returned unpaid by the bank for any rea- 
son. Failure to reimburse the university for an uncollectable check 
may result in class schedules being cancelled. 

A $25 late collection fee will be assessed should an account 
become delinquent and deemed uncollectable, thus requiring refer- 
ral to the Central Collection Unit of the state of Maryland. This fee 
is in addition to the collection fee assessed by the Central 
Collection Unit of the state of Maryland. See Payment of Fees, 
below. 

GRADUATE CHARGES 

The following policies apply to graduate students taking a mix of 
undergraduate and graduate courses and TU seniors taking a grad- 
uate course (with special permission). 

If a graduate student takes a mix of graduate and undergraduate 
courses and the undergraduate unit load is fewer than 12 units, the 
individual is to be billed per unit in each category and part-time 
university fees. If the undergraduate unit load is 12 or more units, 
the flat undergraduate tuition rate and full-time university fees are 
billed with the graduate units billed at the per unit graduate tuition 
rate. 

This policy applies to graduate students taking all undergraduate 
courses. If the unit load of undergraduate courses is 12 units or 
more, the individual is to be billed the flat undergraduate tuition 
and the flat full-time university fees. 

PAYMENT OF FEES 

All checks or money orders should be made payable to Towson 
Universirj' for the exact amount of the charges. The student's name 
and Student ID number must appear on all checks submitted to the 
university-. The university offers a payment plan administered 
through Academic Management Services (AMS). The AMS pay- 
ment plan extends to students a monthly budget plan for meeting 
the cost for tuition, university fees, and on-campus housing and 
meals for either the academic year or term. Students who choose 
such a payment plan may arrange payment through AMS, 
800-635-0120, AMS Web site www.salliemae.com. AMS is not, 
however, affiliated with the university and does not act as the uni- 
versity's agent; accordingly, the university bears no responsibility 
for the acts or omissions of AMS. Moreover, a student's liability 
for tuition and fees is not discharged until payment is made in full. 
The Discover, MasterCard and Visa credit cards can be used for 
tuition, fees, room, meal plan, and other charges. Web credit card 
payments can be made on http://students.towson.edu/. To use: click 
Online Services; click SA Self-Service; click Learner Services; click 
Finances; click Make a Payment. Your TU username and password 
are required to make payment on the Web. Full payment is 
required. Note: Bank check card or debit card payments cannot be 
processed through the Web payment site. If the Web payment 
option is selected, full payment is required. It is imperative 
that students adhere to processing deadlines. To avoid the cancel- 
lation of your class schedule, payment must be received by your 
bill payment due date found on the term bill or at 
www.towson.edu/bursar. You must make payment in full on the 
Web, or by returning the top portion of your billing statement 
along with payment in full or verification of financial aid or third- 



party funds to cover all charges to the Bursar's Office, Enrollment 
Services Center, room 336. Completing the bill payment require- 
ment may secure your class schedule for the term. If your account 
reflects a credit or zero balance and you choose NOT to attend the 
upcoming term, you MUST notify the Registrar's Office on or 
before the bill payment due date to have your class schedule can- 
celled. If you fail to do this, you will be financially responsible for 
all term charges. A $75 late fee is assessed to any student whose 
current due term charges are paid after the bill payment due date, 
which appears on the bill. 

WARNING: Processing of financial billing statements is the 
responsibility of the student and is due to the university each term 
as outlined at www.towson.edu/hursar. Nondelivery of the billing 
statement does not release you from the payment or late payment 
assessments. 

Financial policy set by the Board of Regents and supported by 
the legislative auditors of the state of Maryland states that all pre- 
vious balances must be paid prior to registration for the following 
academic term. The university employs a "first in/first out" tech- 
nique when applying payments to accounts. Therefore, payments 
are used to satisfy the oldest outstanding charge prior to applying 
any portion of a payment to current or more recent charges. 
Should the account of any student become delinquent and sent to 
the Central Collection Unit of the state of Maryland, it is deemed 
delinquent, and a collection fee not to exceed 20 percent will be 
charged to the student by the Central Collection Unit of the state 
of Maryland. In accordance with COMAR Title 17, Subtitle 01, 
Chapter 02, Section 01 through 05, the Central Collection Unit of 
the state of Maryland may report debt to a credit bureau and begin 
intercepting Maryland income tax refunds of individuals indebted 
to the state colleges and universities for tuition, fees and other 
costs. Students with outstanding balances should contact the 
Office of the Bursar. Transcript and diploma requests will not be 
honored if a student has a financial obligation to the university. 
Payments made by check will be subjected to a waiting period of 
10 to 30 working days prior to transcripts or diplomas being 
released or refunds being processed. 

PLEASE NOTE: The university will retroactively bill when coding 
errors are identified. 

REFUND POLICIES 

Students withdrawing from the university must complete an 
Official Withdrawal Form before they are entitled to any refund. 
Withdrawal Forms must be processed by the Registrar's Office. 
The date of withdrawal will be the date on which written notice of 
withdrawal is received. 

For additional information regarding withdrawal, see the 
Academic Regulations section of this catalog. 

Fall/Spring Withdrawal Refund Policy 

Notification to the instructor does not constitute proper with- 
drawal. Withdrawal Forms must be processed by the Registrar's 
Office. The date on which written notice of withdrawal is received 
determines the percentage of refund. .All refund percentages are 
based on the official start of the term. The timing for effecting 
refunds is as follows: 

1. Through the end of each Change of Schedule period, 100 per- 
cent of tuition and fees is refunded to the student. 

2. Beginning with the first day after the end of the Change of 
Schedule period through the 21st calendar day after the official 
start of the term, 50 percent of tuition only is refunded to the stu- 
dent who fully withdraws from the university. 

3. Beginning with the 22nd calendar day after the official start of 
the term, no tuition and fees are refunded to the student. 

NOTE; Based on documentation of extraordinary circumstances, 
including medical, exceptions may be made to this policy. Requests 
for refunds for extraordinary circumstances should be submitted 



Expenses 



immediately; however, no requests will be considered JO days 
beyond the term in question. Undergraduate students should con- 
tact the director of the Bursar's Office. Enrollment Services Center, 
room 315. Graduate students should contact the director of 
Graduate School Operations, 7800 York Rd., room 218. 

Any unpaid charges on a student's financial account with the 
university will be subtracted from the refund due prior to process- 
ing the refund request. For payments made by credit card, refunds 
will be credited to the original credit card account and will be 
reflected on the credit card monthly statement. Credit card pay- 
ments made for term charges are refunded using the following 
practice. For each term, credit card refunds will be processed after 
the term Drop! Add period. However, students may ask for a cred- 
it card refund prior to this period by contacting the Bursar's 
Office. Credit card owners are responsible for paying any and all 
interest charges accrued on the credit card. All questions regarding 
tuition and fees should be referred to the Office of the Bursar, 
Enrollment Services Center, 410-704-2100 or 1-88S-5BURSAR. 

Second Seven-Week Fall/Spring Withdrawal Refund Policy 

Notification to the instructor does not constitute proper withdrawal. 
Withdrawal Forms must be processed by the Registrar's Office. 
The date on which written notice of withdrawal is received deter- 
mines the percentage of refund. All refund percentages are based 
on the official start of the session. 

Students are considered full-time when carrying 12 units or 
greater; therefore, refunds apply only to unit loads under 12. The 
timing for effecting refunds is as follows: 

1. Through the first day of classes after the official start of the sec- 
ond seven-week session, 100 percent of tuition and fees is 
refunded to the student. 

2. During the second and third days of classes after the official 
start of the second seven-week session, 50 percent of tuition 
only is refunded to the student. 

3. Beginning the fourth day of classes after the official start of the 
second seven-week session, no refund is issued. 

NOTE: Based on documentation of extraordinary circumstances, 
including medical, exceptions may be made to this policy. Requests 
for refunds for extraordinary circumstances should be submitted 
immediately; however, no requests will he considered 30 days 
beyond the session in question. Undergraduate students should 
contact the director of the Bursar's Office, Enrollment Services 
Center, room 315. Graduate students should contact the director 
of Graduate School Operations, 7800 York Rd., room 218. 

Any unpaid charges on a student's financial account with the 
university will be subtracted from the refund due prior to process- 
ing the refund request. For payments made by credit card, refunds 
will be credited to the original credit card account and will he 
reflected on the credit card monthly statement. Credit card pay- 
ments made for term charges are refunded using the following 
practice. For each term, credit card refunds will be processed after 
the term Drop/Add period. However, students may ask for a cred- 
it card refund prior to this period by contacting the Bursar's 
Office. Credit card owners are responsible for paying any and all 
interest charges accrued on the credit card. All questions regarding 
tuition and fees should be referred to the Office of the Bursar, 
Enrollment Services Center, 410-704-2100 or 1-8S8-5BURSAR. 



Fees 

The following fees are nonrefundable: 

1. late payment fee 

2. room deposit fee 

3. enrollment contract fee 

4. application fee 

5. closed contract fee 

The following fees are nonrefundable after the official start of class- 
es for the term: 

1 . housing fee 

2. applied fee (private instruction, student teachmg, clinical 
practicum, etc.) 

3. parking permit fee 

The Board Plan Fee is prorated weekly. 

The following fees are nonrefundable after the official Change of 
Schedule period: 

1. mandatorv' university' fees 

2. surcharge/overload fee 

3. course-based fees 

4. technology fee 

5. student classification fee 




Financial Aid 



Financial Aid 

LOCATION 

Enrollment Services Center 339 
410-704-4236 
Fax:410-704-2584 
http://onestop.towson.edu/finaid/ 

Towson University offers scholarships, grants, loans, and work 
programs funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the state of 
Maryland, and Towson University. Scholarships generally use 
merit or academic achievement as the main criterion, while most 
grant and loan programs are need-based. Need-based programs 
help students pay the difference between the cost of education and 
the amount that they (and their families, if they are dependent stu- 
dents) can contribute. Need is determined by the following formula: 



Cost of Education 

-Expected Family Contribution (EFC) 
Outside Resources (state/private scholarships, etc.) 



Need for Title IV and universitv funds 



The U.S. Department of Education calculates the EFC from the 
completed Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), using 
a formula that considers factors such as income, certain assets, 
family size, and number of family members in college. 

The cost of education includes direct costs such as tuition and 
fees and room and board as well as indirect costs including trans- 
portation and personal expenses. 

ESTIMATED COSTS FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS* 





COMMUTER 


RESIDENT 


OUT OF STATE 


Tuition/Fees 


$7,096 


$7,096 


$16,030 


Room/Board 


1,500 


7,112 


7,112 


Books 


912 


912 


912 


Personal 


988 


1,596 


1,596 


Transportation 2,040 


1,798 


1,798 


Total 


$12,536 


$18,514 


$27,448 



'Figures shown are for full-time emoUment for an academic year and are 
subject to revision. Students receive a bill each term for tuition/fees, and 
room and board charges {if the student lives on campus). All other costs 
shown above (including books) are estimates of out of pocket costs. 

"Students may incur additional academic fees, depending on courses 
taken. Please refer to the "Expenses " section of the Towson University 
Undergraduate Catalog. 

DEADLINES AND APPLICATION PROCEDURES 

All students must reapply for financial aid annually, and should do 
so as soon as possible after January 1 at the U.S. Department of 
Education's www.fafsa.ed.gov Web site. 

Students should complete the FAFSA by February 10 each year 
to meet the annual deadline of March 1. This date is the priority 
deadline for federal and university need-based aid for the academ- 
ic year beginning the following September, and the deadline for 
many Maryland state scholarship and grant programs. All students 
must list Towson University (code #002099) in Step 6 of the 
FAFSA. This allows the federal processor to transmit the applica- 
tion results electronically to the Towson Universirs' Financial Aid 
Office. 

The Financial Aid Office offers aid first to students whose appli- 
cations are completed and received from the U.S. Department of 
Education by the March 1 deadline. Applications received after the 
March 1 deadline are processed on a rolling basis, but students 
who apply late for aid should not expect consideration for limited 
campus-based funds. 



Students should take the following steps toward ensuring that 
funds are available in time to pay term charges; 

• complete the FAFSA on or before February 10 to meet the 
March 1 deadline 

• complete the admissions requirements early 

• register for classes at the earliest opportunity 

STUDENT ELIGIBILITY 

Factors that determine eligibility for Federal Title IV and need- 
based university aid include: 

• financial need (except for unsubsidized and parent loans) 

• degree candidacy or formal admission as a regular student 
making satisfactory academic progress toward a degree or 
certificate 

• U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen status 

• possession of a valid Social Security number 

• certification that the applicant is not in default on a student 
loan and does not owe a repayment of a Federal Title FV grant 

• registration for the Selective Service 

FINANCIAL AID SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC 
PROGRESS (SAP) 

Federal and state regulations require the Financial Aid Office to 
monitor the academic progress of students who apply for aid or 
receive aid. The Financial Aid Office checks the progress of aid 
recipients at least once per year and more frequently when deemed 
necessary. The Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for financial 
aid purposes appears in Appendix E. 

VERIFICATION 

Either the U.S. Department of Education or the university can 
select an application for verification. If selected, students must 
provide signed copies of federal income tax returns. They must 
also provide documentation to verif)- information such as the value 
of assets, household size, number in college, etc. The Financial Aid 
Office encourages students to respond promptly and completely to 
any request for additional information. Failure to complete the 
verification process will result in cancellation of any financial aid 
offer. 

IMPORTANT: Aid May Change 

Federal Title IV regulations will not permit students to receive aid 
totaling more than the cost of education. The Financial Aid Office 
may revise or cancel an aid offer if the student: 

• receives additional aid at any time from another source (such 
as a state or private scholarship) 

• provides the university with information that changes the eli- 
gibility for financial aid 

• changes enrollment level, for e.xample, from full- to part-time 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Financial aid, including most federal grants and loans, will not 
transfer from one institution to another. Eligibility for the Federal 
Pell Grant, and some state grants may transfer. 

Students must apply for financial aid using the instructions stat- 
ed in the "DEADLINE AND APPLICATION PROCEDURES" 
section. Mid-year transfer students who have already processed a 
FAFSA to attend a school during the fall term must request that the 
U.S. Department of Education send a copy of the application 
results to Towson University's Financial Aid Office. Students can 
contact the federal processor at 1-800-4-FEDAID. 

CAMPUS-BASED FINANCL\L AID 

Towson University receives a limited amount of money each year 
for the campus-based programs. Campus-based funds go to the 
earliest completed applications from eligible students whose appli- 
cations demonstrate the greatest need. The Financial Aid Office 



Financial Aid 



processes applications in the order of EFC, starting with the lowest 
EFC and continuing through the highest EFC. Students whose 
applications have the lowest EFCs may receive aid from the pro- 
grams requiring exceptional need. 

The Financial Aid Office continues to process applications after 
the March 1 deadline, but late applicants cannot expect considera- 
tion for limited campus-based funds. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant 
This federal grant is for exceptionally needy students pursuing a 
first bachelor's degree. Towson University may offer up to $4,000 
to an eligible applicant. 

Institutional Grant 

Towson University may offer up to $4,000 to first bachelor's 
degree candidates who have financial need. 

Federal Perkins Loan 

Towson Universit)' may offer Perkins Loans to undergraduate and 
graduate degree candidates. The university offers loans from this 
program first to students with exceptional financial need. 
Undergraduate students may receive up to $4,000 per year. The 
statutory limit is $8,000 for a student who has not reached junior 
standing, and $20,000 for all undergraduate borrowing from this 
program. 

This federal loan has an annual interest of 5 percent. Interest 
does not begin to accrue, and no payment of principal is due, until 
nine months after the borrower leaves school or drops below 
enrollment for at least 6 units. Payments depend on the total 
amount borrowed, but will never be less than $40 per month, plus 
interest. 

Federal Work Study 

This Federal Title YV program allows undergraduate and graduate 
degree candidates to work and earn money for educational e.xpenses. 
The university pays aid from this program through paychecks every 
two weeks. The eligibility does not offset direct university charges 
such as tuition and fees. 

Students can find jobs on campus or in approved off-campus 
organizations and agencies. The university' encourages students to 
consider off-campus jobs in community service organizations. 
Towson University's Career Center maintains a list of available 
Federal Work-Study positions. 

DIRECT FEDERAL AID 

Unlike the campus-based programs, the university has no limit on 
the total number of eligible students who can receive aid from the 
direct aid programs. However, federal regulations limit the amount 
any student can receive from each program. 

Federal Pell Grant 

This federal grant is for first bachelor's degree candidates who have 
exceptional financial need. Pell Grants range from $400 to $4,050. 

Federal Direct Student Loan Program 

These long-term loans are for first and second bachelor's degree 
students, as well as certificate and graduate students. The applica- 
tion requirements for these loans are the same as for other federal 
grant and loan programs. Borrowers must carry at least 6 units per 
term. 

Depending on the amount of need, an aid offer may include an 
interest-subsidized loan or an unsuhsidized loan. Some students 
receive both subsidized and unsuhsidized loans. 

The main difference between a subsidized loan and an unsuhsi- 
dized loan is the point at which interest begins to accrue. No inter- 
est accrues on a subsidized loan until the end of a six-month grace 
period which begins when the borrower graduates, withdraws, or 



drops below enrollment for at least 6 units. Interest on an unsuh- 
sidized loan accrues during enrollment, and throughout the grace 
period. The interest rate for Direct Loans is variable, and capped 
at 8.25 percent. 

All borrowers pay interest while in repayment. The repayment 
period begins at the end of the grace period. 

All borrowers pay a loan origination fee of 3 percent to the U.S. 
Department of Education. The universit)' must deduct this fee from 
the loan proceeds. 

Direct loans have annual limits: freshmen, $2,625; sophomores, 
$3,500; juniors and seniors, $5,500. Students who meet the 
Federal Title IV definition of self-supporting may borrow addition- 
al unsubsidized funds of up to $4,000 for freshman and sophomore 
standing and up to $5,000 for junior and senior standing. 

Aggregate loan limits are $46,000 for undergraduate borrowing, 
of which no more than $23,000 may be subsidized. 

Federal Direct Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) 

Parents of dependent students can borrow up to the cost of educa- 
tion minus all other aid received. Applicants do not have to demon- 
strate need. However, the U.S. Department of Education approves 
a loan from this federal program only after an evaluation of the 
parent borrower's credit history. 

Interest begins to accrue at the time of disbursement. The inter- 
est rate is variable, and capped at 9 percent. All borrowers pay a 
loan origination fee of 4 percent to the U.S. Department of 
Education. The universit)' must deduct this fee from the loan proceeds. 

A new PLUS borrower must complete an electronic Master 
Promissory note before receiving any disbursement of loan pro- 
ceeds to the student's university account. 

LOAN COUNSELING AND PROMISSORY NOTE 
REQUIREMENTS FOR BORROWERS 

New loan borrowers at Towson University of Federal Perkins 
Loans or Federal Direct Student Loans must complete entrance 
loan counseling. Borrowers who graduate or leave school must 
complete exit loan counseling sessions. These sessions provide bor- 
rowers with information on their rights and responsibilities. 

New borrowers will find entrance and exit loan counseling for 
Direct Loans, as well as entrance counseling for the Federal Perkins 
Loan Program at http://onestop.towson.edu/finaid/. The universi- 
ty's Office of Financial Services provides exit loan counseling for 
Perkins Loan borrowers. 

New borrowers must complete an electronic Master Promissory 
note before receiving any disbursement of loan proceeds to their 
university accounts. 

STATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

The state of Maryland offers scholarships and grants based on 
financial need or merit, or a combination of both. Legal residents 
of Maryland apply using the F.-^FSA or the Renewal FAFSA. The 
deadline is March 1. 

Some state scholarships, such as teaching and child care scholar- 
ships, require special applications and have different deadlines. For 
more information about state scholarships, students can call the 
Maryland State Office of Student Financial Assistance at 410-260- 
4565, or visit the ww\v.mhec. state. md. us Web site. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

Financial Aid Disbursements 

Generally, students receive one-half of academic year financial aid 
funds (except Federal Work-Study) each term. The university will 
credit aid toward term charges for tuition and fees and other direct 
university charges. 



Financial Aid 



First-time Federal Direct Student Loan borrowers who have 
freshman standing (fewer than 30 earned units) cannot receive the 
first disbursement of loan proceeds to their university accounts 
until they have been enrolled for 30 days. This federal requirement 
only affects the first disbursement of the freshman's first loan. 

Students who borrow for a single term, (i.e. fall only, spring only 
or summer only), will receive two disbursements to their university 
accounts: one at the beginning of the loan period (or 30 days into 
the term if the borrower is a freshman), and one at the mid-point 
of the term. 

Whenever the amount of term aid credited to a student's account 
exceeds the term charges, the student has a credit balance and will 
receive a rebate check to use for books and day-to-day expenses. 

The Office of the Bursar will disburse rebate checks for credit 
balances no earlier than one week before the first day of the fall and 
spring terms and no earlier than the first day of a student aid recip- 
ient's summer session. Students may have a delay in receiving 
rebate checks if they have received a late or revised aid offer, or if 
they are subject to the Direct Loan 30-day hold or two-disburse- 
ment requirement. A student can ask the Office of the Bursar to 
convert a portion of the student's credit balance for retail points on 
the student's Towson University OneCard for the purchase of 
books, or for use at any campus food location. 

Minimester 

Students cannot receive Federal Title FV or university aid financial 
aid for Minimester. 

Summer 

A supplemental application is required for summer aid and is avail- 
able from the Financial Aid Office and online at 
http://onestop.towson.edu/finaid/. Summer aid is usually limited to 
loans from the Federal Direct Loan Program, and available only if 
the student did not borrow the maximum for his or her grade level 
for the academic year immediately preceding the summer term. 

Financial Aid Advising 

Students and parents can schedule appointments to speak with 
Towson University financial aid advisers in person or by telephone. 
To schedule an appointment, call 410-704-4236. 

Refund Policy 

When a student withdraws from all courses during a term when the 
student is receiving Federal Title IV student aid, the Financial Aid 
Office must determine what portion of the student's term aid (not 
including Federal Work-Study funds) will revert to the federal pro- 
grams. The Financial Aid Office must use a statutory federal 
refund formula required by the U.S. Department of Education to 
determine what portion of aid paid to university charges has been 
"earned" and what portion must be considered "unearned." 

The percentage of assistance earned is equal to the percentage of 
the term completed as of the day the student withdraws. (If the 
withdrawal occurs after the 60 percent point, the percentage of aid 
earned is 100 percent.) The amount of aid not earned by the stu- 
dent is calculated by determining the complement of the percentage 
of assistance the student earned. That percentage is then applied to 
the total amount of grant and loan assistance disbursed for the 
term. 

If the student received more grant or loan assistance than the 
amount earned, the university or the student (or both) must return 
the unearned funds to the Federal Title /V programs. 

Towson LIniversity returns the lesser of the unearned amount of 
Title IV assistance; or the institutional charges incurred for the 
term, multiplied by the unearned percentage of Title IV grant and 
loan assistance. Institutional charges are limited to tuition, fees, 
and room and board, (if the student paid these charges to the uni- 
versity). 



The student returns unearned Title IV' assistance minus the 
amount the university returns. The U.S. Department of Education 
does not allow discretion on the part of the university for non-insti- 
tutional costs. In most cases, when a student receives Title IV assis- 
tance greater than the amount of institutional charges and com- 
pletely withdraws from the university, the student will have to 
return some of those federal funds. 

Academic Dismissal or Suspension 

Academic dismissal or suspension will always result in cancellation 
of financial aid for future terms. A student who receives formal 
readmission to the university as a degree candidate may request 
consideration for financial aid. 

Internet Services 

The Financial Aid Office has a comprehensive, interactive Web 
page. This Web site, at http://onestop.towson.edu/finaid/ allows 
students to use many financial aid services electronically. Students 
can apply for financial aid online and link to other recommended 
Web sites. 

Other Resources 

Regular Student Employment 

Various departments on campus hire students. Students will find a 
list of current job openings at the www.towson.edu/careercenter 
Web site of the Career Center. 

Student Employment Program 

This office helps students find part-time jobs off-campus in the 
Baltimore metropolitan area. For additional information, visit the 
www.towson.edu/careercenter Web site of the Career Center. 

Private Scholarships 

Various businesses, foundations and civic organizations offer 
scholarships. Students should check directly with groups in their 
local communities. The www.fastWEB.com Web site is another 
source for private scholarship information. 

Veteran's Benefits 

Veterans or eligible dependents should contact the Baltimore 
Regional Office of the Veterans Administration (1-800-827-1000) 
with questions regarding eligibility. Towson University's Veterans 
Office (410-704-3094) certifies applications. 

Alternative Loans 

Students may borrow alternative loans from private lenders outside 
the university. These non-federal loans can supplement other 
sources of student financial aid. Students and parents can 
find links to alternative loan lenders at the: 
http://onestop.towson.edu/finaid/ Web site of the Financial Aid 
Office. 

Alternate Payment Plan 

The Bursar's Office accepts the TuitionPay payment plan from 
Academic Management Services. Instead of paying the balance of 
term charges in a lump sum, students and families can spread inter- 
est-free monthly payments over a period of months. TuitionPay 
program participants pay a modest annual application fee to 
Academic Management Services. To learn more about the 
TuitionPay program, students and parents can call AMS at 1-800- 
635-0120, or visit the TuitionPay Web site at www.tuitionpay.com. 



Financial Aid 



SCHOLARSHIP OFFICE 

Enrollment Ser\'ices Center 307 

410-704-2647 

E-mail: SchoIarship@towson.edu 

http://onestop.towson.edu/finaicl/ 

The Towson Universin,' Scholarship Office is a unit of the Financial 
Aid Office, and ser\es as a clearinghouse for information on merit 
scholarships. In addition to serving as an information center, this 
office handles the applications for several universirv-wide scholar- 
ships. 

Scholarship Seeker 

The Scholarship Seeker allows a student to search for Towson 
Universitv' and state of Maryland scholarships. Students can view 
lists of potential scholarships, and link to detailed information 
about scholarship requirements and application procedures. The 
Scholarship Seeker is a part of the Financial Aid Office Web site at 
http://onestop.towson.edu/finaid/. 

Over- Award Policy 

Towson University will not award or disburse a combined total of 
federal, state, institutional and/or private scholarships that exceeds 
a student's cost of education unless all of the funding comes from 
a private external source. The cost of education is a standardized 
budget including tuition, fees, room, board and allowances for 
indirect costs such as transportation and personal expenses. 
Whenever a student's total aid package exceeds the cost of educa- 
tion, the Financial Aid Office will reduce aid offered by the uni- 
versity. 

Private Scholarships 

Students who receive scholarships from private organizations out- 
side the university (not including Maryland state scholarships) 
should contact the Office of the Bursar to arrange for payment of 
scholarship funds. The Office of the Bursar will disburse scholar- 
ship proceeds in accordance with procedures and policies set by 
the private scholarship donors and Towson University. Students 
may defer partial payment of university charges before receipt of 
scholarship proceeds by forwarding a copy of the scholarship 
award lener to the Office of the Bursar. Any outstanding balance 
created when a student or donor fails to provide the university 
with adequate, timely information will become a financial obliga- 
tion of the student. 

Office of Admissions Scholarships 

Towson University awards a limited number of academic scholar- 
ships each fall to qualified, full-time incoming freshmen and trans- 
fer students. The Office of Admissions awards these merit-based 
scholarships without regard to financial need. The earliest appli- 
cants for admission receive priority consideration. Although stu- 
dents do not need a separate application for these scholarships, 
they must complete their admission applications, and provide 
transcripts and test results by December 1. 

The following list of scholarships includes information on the 
minimum qualifications required for consideration. Scholarships 
go to students with the best qualifications. The required GPAs and 
test scores will change from year to year, and may change for the 
upcoming year after publication. 



Commonwealth Award 

• 3.00+ GPA 

• Must apply directly from a Baltimore City Public School 

• Designation as a Commonwealth or Commonwealth Plus 
Student 

Cultural Diversity Scholarship 

• Marvland resident 

• Freshmen: 3.30+ GPA, 1000+ SAT I 

• Communit\' college transfers: 3.00+ GPA with 56 transferable 
credits 

• Essay required on involvement with diversity^ enhancement 

Honors College Scholarship 

• Competitive award for Honors College freshmen 

Helen Aletta Linthicimi Scholarship 

• Maryland high school valedictorians 

• Academic credentials and class rank considered 

• Presidential, University and Provost's scholars are not eligible 

Phi Theta Kappa Transfer Scholarship 

• Community college transfers 

• 3.50+ college GPA and 56+ units by time of transfer 

• Member of Phi Theta Kappa 

Provost's Scholarship 

• Freshmen: 3.80 GPA, 1190+ SAT 1 

• Community college transfers: 3.50 GPA and 56+ transferable 
credits 

Top Ten Scholars Program 

• Baltimore City and Baltimore County public school students 
graduating in the top 10 percent of their senior classes 

• Completion of college prep curriculum 

• Interested students must obtain a Towson University 
Application for Admission and a Top 10% Scholar 
Certification form from their high school guidance counselors 

• Deadline: January 31, 2006 for freshman class entering 
September 2006 

• Applicants must complete a Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA) but do not have to demonstrate fmancial 
need 

• Recipients receive renewable scholarships and opportunities 
for special services 




The College of Business and Economics 



The College of Business and Economics (CBE) 

VISION 

CBE's vision is to he widely recognized as an Outstanding College of Applied Business 
Studies. 

MISSION 

CBE's mission is to provide: 

• a strong undergraduate business education for high-achieving students and selected 
graduate programs based upon specific CBE strengths and needs 

• a good balance of theory, application and personal development activities that creates a 
challenging environment of integrated learning 

• each student with the opportunity to meet the required "Profile of a CBE Graduate" 
through faculty members who consistently demonstrate quality teaching, advising and 
important scholarly contributions in their fields of expertise 

• a nurturing culture of high expectations that properly prepares each student for life 
beyond college 

• a strong outreach program to create dynamic partnerships beyond the university for eco- 
nomic and societal development, academic linkages that enhance the teaching/learning 
environment throughout our college, and CBE's inclusion in the fabric of the community. 

Shohreh Kaynama, Dean 
Louise Laurence. Associate Dean 
Louise W. Smith. Acting Assistant Dean 
The Entire CBE Faculty and Staff 



Accounting 

Business Administration 

e-Business 

Economics 

Finance 

Financial Planning 

Human Resource Management 

International Business 

Legal Studies 

Management 

Marketing 



COLLEGE OFFICE 

Stephens Hall 218, 410-704-3342 

Fax: 410-704-3664 

E-mail: cbedean@towson.edu 

www.towson.edu/cbe 



The College of Business and Economics 



PROFILE OF A COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS GRADUATE 

The College of Business and Economics (CBE) understands the need for its graduates to be broad-based and ready to perform immedi- 
ately upon entering the job market, both as individuals and in teams. Therefore, its curriculum contains concrete, measurable and attain- 
able objectives throughout. As a result, each CBE graduate is expected to perform successfully, as both an indi\ idual and a team member, 
in the following areas of Knowledge, Skills and Attitudes (KSAs): 

1. COMMUNICATION — WRITTEN, SPOKEN, GRAPHIC AND ELECTRONIC 

• Write articulate, persuasive and influential business reports, proposals and letters 

• Make articulate, persuasive and influential individual and team presentations 

• Develop graphic, spreadsheet and financial analysis support for positions taken 

• Display presentation skills 

• Generate appropriate visual aids 

• Use correct written structure, spelling, grammar and organization 

• Articulate another's viewpoint through verbal and nonverbal interpretation 

• Resolve interpersonal and team conflicts 

• Negotiate effectivelv 

2. THINKING — CRITICAL, CREATIVE AND INTEGRATED 

• Use problem-solving techniques 

• Use adaptable, flexible thinking 

• Use critical thinking to produce comprehensive, supported, integrated conclusions 

• Use creative thinking methods to produce ideas 

• Distinguish (1) fact from opinion and (2) critical from noncritical information 

• Develop several workable solutions to a problem 

• Show common sense 

• Demonstrate continuous learning (learning to learn) 

3. TECHNOLOGY 

• Use sofnvare for writing, spreadsheets, databases, presentations and decision support 

• Demonstrate self-taught use of a second software package 

• Use e-mail. World Wide Web, Internet and other contemporarv electronic services 

4. ETHICS AND VALUES 

• Consistently accept responsibility for one's own actions 

• Display ethical conduct and honor-system behavior 

• Apply ethics in reaching busmess recommendations 

• Promote beneflts of good ethical behavior while recognizing practical ethical challenges 

• Displav a "win-win" attitude 

5. ACCREDITED BUSINESS CONTENT 

• Know, apply and integrate the content in one's major 

• Apply and integrate accumulated cross-discipline concepts 

• Value the relevance of each business disciplme in todav's business world 

6. DIVERSITV' — INTERNATIONAL AND DEMOGRAPHIC 

• Apply international concepts and contemporary issues to business situations 

• Apply domestic diversity concepts and contemporary issues to business situations 

• Show sensitivity to others' views, values and business customs 

• Discuss relevant global business developments 

• Interact as a business professional with people of other cultures and subcultures 

7. PRACTICAL EXCELLENCE 

• Demonstrate effective team skills 

• Display professional business behavior and appearance 

• Network with professionals 

• Manage time and tasks 

• Use estimates, analogies and examples 

• Demonstrate development of one's self-esteem and "can do" attitude 

8. LEADERSHIP, ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND COMMUNITY SERVICE 

• Demonstrate group leadership 

• Describe one's own risk-taking proflle 

• Differentiate between a leader, a manager and an entrepreneur 

• Perform community service 

• Foster leadership potential in self and others 

9. JOB EXPERIENCE AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT 

• Show evidence of a quality, mentored, reflective professional experience 

• Organize a persuasive, informative resume 

• Create a portfolio that displays evidence of employability 

• Demonstrate effective job search and interview skills 

• Assume responsibility for one's own career goal-setting and lifelong learning 

"1996 Towson LIniversit\ 



I 



The College of Business and Economics 



College of Business and 
Economics 

Towson University is the only University System of Maryland 
(USM) state university with both its Business and Accounting pro- 
grams accredited by AACSB International - the Association to 
Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. 

PROGRAMS AVAILABLE 

Ma]or in Accounting 

Financial Planning Track 
Major in Business Administration 

Economics Track 

Financial Planning Certification Preparation 

Human Resource Management Track 

International Business Concentration 

Legal Studies Track 

Management Concentration 

Marketing Concentration 

Double Major in Business Administration and Computer 
Information Systems 
Major in e-Business 

Double Major in e-Business and Business Administration 
(Marketing) 

Double Major in e-Business and Computer Information Systems 

Financial Planning Track 
Major in Economics 

Double Major in Economics and Geography and 
Environmental Planning 

Double Major in Economics and Mathematics 

Double Major in Economics and Political Science 
Minor in Business Administration 
Minor in Economics 

DISTINCTLVE FEATURES 

• Center for Applied Business and Economic Research 

• Maryland Council on Economic Education 

• Business Advisory Boards 

- CBE Advisory Board 

- Accounting Advisory Board 

- e-Business Advisory Board 

- Finance Advisory Board 

- Human Resources Advisory Board 

• Student Organizations 

- Student Leadership Council 

- American Marketing Association 

- Beta Alpha Psi 

- Beta Gamma Sigma 

- e-Business Association 

- Economics Club 

- Financial Management Association 

- Wall Street Investment Club 

TRANSFER CREDIT POLICIES 

In order to graduate from Towson University with a major from 
the CBE, students must complete at least 50 percent of the units 
required in their major at Towson University. 

Lower-Level Courses: Students planning to transfer into the 
Business Administration, Electronic Business or Accounting 
majors at Towson University are encouraged to take the lower- 
level core courses: Principles of Accounting I and II, 
Microeconomics and .Macroeconomics, Statistics, Legal 
Environment of Business, and Computer Science (COSC 111/112 
equivalent). Students transferring from a Maryland community 
college should inquire at that institution's transfer office regarding 
the Recommended Transfer Program (RTP) for the Business 



Administration, Electronic Business or Accounting majors at TU. 
Students may verify whether a course will be accepted in transfer 
for a CBE major or minor by referring to ARTSYS, the articulation 
system of Maryland, available at http://artweb.usmd.edu/ or by 
contacting Towson University's CBE Student Academic Services, 
410-704-3496. 

After transferring to Towson University, students are encouraged 
to take such courses as finance, marketing, management and e- 
Business because these are upper-level courses at the university. 
Courses completed at a community college or a four-year college 
that are offered at TU as upper-level courses do not need to be 
repeated but must be validated in order to be recognized as meet- 
ing upper-level requirements. Validation generally requires that 
another specified course in the same discipline be completed at 
Towson University with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. 

Upper-Level Courses: A four-year college's transferred course that 
possesses "level and content equivalency" of a TU course may be 
used to satisfy a core/elective requirement with the approval of the 
major department. Only one transferred course will be accepted in 
fulfillment of a concentration/track requirement. A student intend- 
ing to transfer a course must provide a course description from the 
other college's catalog. Contact CBE Student Academic Services, 
410-704-3496, for policy and procedures regarding transfer of 
units for upper-level accounting, business, e-Business and/or eco- 
nomics courses. 

NOTE: Courses taken at a community college or other two-year 
school cannot transfer as upper-level units. 

CBE STUDENT ACADEMIC SERVICES 

Stephens Hall 104, 410-704-3496 

Fax:410-704-2300 

E-mail: lsawyer@to\vson.edu 

http://www.towson.edu/cbe/student/ 

Director: Patricia Atkinson 

Administrative Assistant: Linda Sawyer 

The College of Business and Economics (CBE) Student Academic 
Services is the first place a student contacts for information or assis- 
tance concerning a major or minor program in the College of 
Business and Economics. We encourage students to invest in them- 
selves by taking advantage of the wealth of resources provided by 
Towson University and the CBE such as student clubs and organi- 
zations, study abroad programs, career exploration services, career 
fairs and networking events, tutoring and faculty advising. Our 
team of professional staff, student aides and CBE student consult- 
ants are available to provide information and assistance to both 
current and prospective CBE students, and in particular to those 
students seeking admission to the Business Administration major. 

BUSINESS EXCELLENCE PROGRAM 

Stephens Hall 104, 410-704-3496 

Fax:410-704-2300 

http: www.new.towson.eduWbec 

BUSX 301 Coordinator: Susanna Sayre 

BUSX 460 Coordinator: Laleh Malek 

Lecturers: Kathryn Delahanty, Quincey Johnson, Robert Miller, 

Susanna Sayre, Deirdre Woodward 

MISSION STATEMENT 

To be widely recognized as a model program that enhances lifelong 
professional performance and ethical decision-making in our met- 
ropolitan community. 



The College of Business and Economics 



DISTINCTIVE FEATURES 

Towson Universin''s College of Business and Economics is one of 
the few business schools in the nation with a separate unit specifi- 
cally designed to enhance business performance in the college and 
in the workplace. Working with the rest of the CBE faculty, these 
professors teach essential knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSAs) in 
business writing, professional presentations, problem solving, 
teamwork and self-assessment. 

BUSX COURSES 

BUSX 301 Business Cornerstone 

This course provides essential knowledge, skills, and attitudes 
(KSAs) that serve as the foundation for the rest of the CBE course- 
work. BUSX 301 should be completed as soon as possible after the 
Lower-Level Core courses. 

BUSX 460 Professional Experience 

This course focuses on a successful transition between the last col- 
lege term and the first day of professional work. Students take an 
internship as part of the course. Through self-assessment, students 
develop a portfolio that demonstrates their knowledge, skills and 
attitudes (KSAs) and their commitment to lifelong career develop- 
ment. A special permit is required. 

ENGL 317 Writing for Business and Industry 

Seats in selected sections of this Advanced Writing course are avail- 
able onlv to CBE students. Special permits are available in Stephens 
Hall 104. 



Department of 
Accounting 




Professors: Lamont Steedle {Chair), Martin Freedman, Norma 
Holter, Man C. Maloo, Charles Martin, Donald Rosenberg, 
Barbara Stewart 

Associate Professors: Raymond Castaldi, Kang Cheng, Seth 
Hammer, Benjamin Neil, Andrew Schiff, Michael Seganish 

Assistant Professors: Barry Buchoff 

Part-Time Faculty: Theresa Akerman, Alan Alper, Teresa Beck, 
Michael Broache, Robert Campbell, Francis Czosnowski, 
Quincey Johnson, Dennis Kreiner, Brian Lazarus, Frank Meyer, 
Robert Miller, Patrick Motsay, Robert Scott, Frank Segel, Mark 
Shaughness, Charles Tiedebohl, William Tignanelli, Tammy 
Turner, Richard Winelander 

Administrative Assistant: Paulette Pearson 

OFFICE 

Stephens Hall 102, 410-704-2227 

Fax; 410-704-3641 

E-mail: ppearson@towson.edu 

www.towson.edu/cbe/department/accounting/welcome.html 

PROGRAMS AVAILABLE 

• Major in Accountmg 

• Financial Planning Track 

WFTi' STUDY ACCOUNTING? 

• To prepare for college-graduate, entry-level jobs such as cost 
accountant, staff accountant and tax preparer 

• To prepare for specialized master's programs in Accounting and 
the CPA Exam in order to hold jobs such as auditor, tax advis- 
er, system analyst, business and personal accountant, and busi- 
ness and personal financial adviser. (Note: The state of 
Maryland requires 30 units beyond the B.S. to qualify to sit 
for the CPA exam. Students who are not Maryland residents 
should check their own state's requirements.) 

In business and society", accountants make a difference. They pre- 
pare and review the financial information that is relied upon by 
mvestors, lenders, businesses and other organizations throughout 
the world. Accountants also provide expert advice on taxes, finan- 
cial planning, information systems and a wealth of other business 
matters. In today's fast-paced, rapidly changing world, few careers 
offer as many advantages and rewards as a career in accounting. 
These include: 

• a high level of job security 

• competitive starting salaries 

• a wide range of career options 

• top-tier income potential 

• a path to senior management 

• the option to create your own business 

• an opportunity to travel 

• a respected, established profession 

• the knowledge that you are an expert, trusted adviser 

• the satisfaction of helping others 

At Towson University, you will join one of only two accounting 
programs among Maryland's public colleges and universities 
accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of 
Business (AACSB International). Of all the accounting programs in 
the United States, onlv about one in three have achieved this dis- 



Department of Accounting 



If you are interested in becoming a Certified Public Accountant 
(CPA), you will be well prepared for the CPA examination. Our 
pass rates are consistently number one or two among all higher 
education institutions in Maryland. In fact, Towson University 
recently ranked number one in the United States on two of the four 
CPA exam parts, and number seven in the United States and num- 
ber one in the East overall. 

A wealth of additional information about accounting is available 
on the Internet. A few of the Web sites that you may want to visit 
include the Department of Labor Occupational Outlook 
Handbook (www.bls.gov/oco/ocos001.htm), the American 
Institute of CPAs (www.StartHereGoPlaces.com), and the 
Maryland Association of CPAs (www.tomorrowscpa.org). 

MISSION AND CORE VALUES 

Our mission is: 

• to provide students with a high-quality graduate and under- 
graduate accounting education built on a comprehensive foun- 
dation in the liberal arts and sciences; 

• to provide students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes 
necessary to assume positions of responsibility and leadership 
in business and society; and, 

• to provide students and faculty with learning experiences 
through a combination of scholarly activities and partnerships 
with the accounting profession and the business community. 

We are committed: 

• to honoring and rewarding excellence in teaching and scholar- 
ship; 

• to promoting and fostering professionalism and ethical behav- 
ior among our faculty and our students; and, 

• to fostering a climate that is conducive to collegiality, civility 
and openness to diverse ideas and views. 

DISTINCTIVE FEATURES 

• Student Chapter of Beta Alpha Psi 

• Accounting Advisory Board (of business professionals) 

• Annual Accounting Open House 

• Annual Department of Accounting Awards Banquet 

• Annual Accounting Alumni Reunion 

• Student Awards for Academic Achievement: 

— CPA Review Scholarships 

— MACPA Outstanding Achievement in Accounting Award 

— Association of Government Accountants Award 

— Financial Executives Institute Academic Honors 

— Sylvia Bernstein Prize for Excellence in Accounting 

— Russell E. Denison Annual Award for Excellence in 
Accounting 

— Outstanding Accounting Student Achievement Award 

— Institute of Internal Auditors Award 

ACCOUNTING PROGRAM 

The undergraduate Accounting major is a 120-unit program. The 
program provides the necessary transition to specialized master's 
programs in accounting. It is also designed for students who wish 
to prepare for the CPA examination and enter the public account- 
ing profession by completing the 15-unit Financial Planning Track, 
an additional 30 units of undergraduate elective courses, or by 
completing the requirements for a second major or minor. 

The lower-level core, upper-level business core and upper-level 
accounting core courses required of all Accounting majors are set 
forth below. 

All major course requirements must be completed with a grade 
equivalent of 2.00 or higher. Majors must score in the 50th per- 
centile or above on the ATAG (Achievement Test for Accounting 
Graduates) in order to graduate. 



Requirements for the Major 

Application Procedure for Continuation in the Accounting Major 

Students complete the Accounting Application, available in the 
department office, Stephens Hall 102, after completing 6 units of 
upper-level accounting courses at Towson University and attaining 
a: 

• 2.70 GPA or higher in ail courses completed when applying 

• 2.70 GPA or higher in all accounting courses completed when 
applying, and 

• Completion of 

1. ECON 205 or MATH 231 (Statistics) with a grade equivalent 
of 2.00 or higher 

2. an ANTH or PSYC or SOCI course 

3. a POSC course 

Lower-Level Core Courses (27 units) 

ACCT 201 Accounting Principles I (or ACCT 21 1) (3) 

ACCT 202 Accounnng Principles II (or ACCT 212) (3) 

LEGL 225 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

LEGL 226 Business Law (3) 

COMM 131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 

cose 111 Information and Technology for Business 

(orCOSC 112) (3) 
ECON 201 Microeconomic Principles (or ECON 203) (3) 
ECON 202 Macroeconomic Principles (or ECON 204) (3) 
ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics I (3) 

or 
MATH 231 Basic Statistics (or MATH 233) (3) 



Other Required Courses (9 units) 

One ANTH or PSYC or SOCI course (3) 

One POSC course (3) 

PHIL 371 Business Ethics (3) 

Upper-Level Business Core Courses (24 units) 

BUSX 301 Business Cornerstone (3) 

ECON 306 Statistics for Business and Economics (3) 
FIN 331 Principles of Financial Management (3) 

FPLN 341 Fundamentals of Financial Planning (3) 

MKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (3) 

or 
MKTG 342 Department Honors Principles of Marketing (3) 
MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 
MNGT 481 Business Strategy and Policy (3) 
One of the following international courses: 
ECON 305 Survey of International Economics (3) 
FIN 435 International Finance (3) 

MKTG 445 International Marketing (3) 
MNGT 375 International Business: Theory and Practice (3) 

Upper-Level Accounting Courses (27 units) 
ACCT 300 Accounting Information Systems (3) 
ACCT 301 Intermediate Accounting I (3) 
ACCT 302 Intermediate Accounting II (3) 
ACCT 303 Intermediate Accounting 111 (3) 
ACCT 321 Advanced Accounting I (3) 
ACCT 341 Cost Accounting 1 (3) 
ACCT 361 Tax Accounting I (3) 
ACCT 401 Auditing I (3) 
One Accounting elective selected from: 
ACCT 342 Cost Accounting II (3) 
ACCT 362 Tax Accounting II (3) 
ACCT 402 Auditing II (3) 

Suggested but not required: If you do not have accounting or busi- 
ness experience, consider adding ACCT 497 Accounting 
Internship or BUSX 460 Professional Experience. These units may 
be counted toward the 150-unit CPA requirement. 



The College of Business and Economics 



SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR 
ACCOUNTING MAJORS 

Before advancing into upper-level courses, students need to com- 
plete specific prerequisite courses with a minimum grade equivalent 
of 2.00 or higher. See your adviser for information. Students must 
also have earned a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.70 and a mini- 
mum GPA of 2.70 in Accounting. 

While completing the freshman and sophomore sequences, stu- 
dents also need to complete one Political Science course, usually 
taken as either GenEd II.B.2 or GenEd II. D, and one Anthropology, 
Psychology or Sociology course, usually taken as GenEd II.B.2 or 
GenEd II. D. After completing these sequences, students will still 
need to fulfill GenEd I.D., II.A.2, II.C.l and II. C. 3 in the junior or 
senior year. Students should consult with their adviser to make the 
most appropriate elective choices. 

Based on course availability and student needs and preferences, 
the selected sequences will probably vary from those presented 
below. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 
First Term (15 units) 

ACCT 201 Accounting Principles I (ACCT 21 1 Honors) (3) 
GenEd I1.C.2 ECON 201 iMicroeconomic Principles (ECON 203 
Honors) (3) 



JUNIOR YEAR 
First Term (15 units) 



GenEd I.A. 
GenEd I.B. 

GenEd l.C 



Second Term ( 
ACCT 202 
ECON 202 
GenEd II.B.2 
GenEd II.D. 
Statistics 



cose 111 Information and Technology for Business 

(COSC 112 Honors) (3) 

iMATH 11 1 Algebra for .iXpplications (prerequisite 

for ECON 205/MATH 231) (3) 

or 

MATH 231 Basic Statistics (MATH 233 Honors) (3) 

or 

ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics I (3) 

15 units) 

Accounting Principles II (ACCT 212 Honors) (3) 

Macroeconomic Principles (ECON 204 Honors) (3) 

POSC or ANTH. PSYC or SOCI 

POSC or ANTH, PSYC or SOCI 

ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics I (3) 

or 

MATH 231 Basic Statistics (MATH 233 Honors) (3) 



or 
LEGE 225 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 
First Term (16 units) 



Legal Environment of Business (3) 



ACCT 300 


ACCT 30 


GenEd II.A.l 


GenEd I1.B.3 


LEGE 225 


LEGE 226 


Second Term 


ACCT 302 


ACCT 341 


ECON 306 


GenEd II.A.l 


or 


LEGE 226 


GenEd I.D. 



Accounting Information Systems (3) 
Intermediate Accounting I (3) 
Lab (4) 

COMM 1 3 1 Fundamentals of Speech Communicanons 
(3) 

Legal Environment of Business (3) 
or 

Business Law (3) 
(15 units) 

Intermediate Accounting II (3) 

Cost Accounting 1(3) 

Statistics for Business and Economics (3) 



Business Law (3) 

ENGL 317 recommended (3) 



ACCT 303 
BUSX 301 
GenEd II.C.l 
FIN 331 
MNGT361 
Second Term ( 
ACCT 321 
ACCT 361 
MKTG 341 
FPLN 341 
GenEd I.E. 



Intermediate Accounting III (3) 
Business Cornerstone (3) 

Principles of Financial Management (3) 
Principles of Management (3) 
15 units) 
Advanced Accounting (3) 
Tax Accounting (3) 

Principles of Markenng (3) (MKTG 342) 
Fundamentals of Financial Planning (3) 



SENIOR YEAR 

First Term (IS units) 

ACCT 401 Auditing 1(3) 

PHIL 371 Business Ethics (3) 

Elective (3| 

International Requirement - one of the following; 

ECON 305 Survey of International Economics (3) 

International Finance (3) 

International Marketing (3) 

International Business: Theory and Practice (3) 



FIN 435 
MKTG 445 
MNGT 375 
GenEd II.A.l 



or 

GenEd ILB.l 
Second Term (15 units) 

ACCTx.xx Accounting Elective (3) 

MNGT 481 Business Strategy and Policy (3) 
GenEd II.A.2 
GenEd II.C.3 
Non-CBE Elective (3) 

FINANCIAL PLANNING TRACK (15 units) 

Coordinator: Barrv Buchoff 

Stephens Hall 102' 410-704-2227 

The 15-unit Financial Planning program is a track that offers 

dents majoring in Accounting the academic course work needc' 

qualify to take the CFP' Certification Examination and prov 

entry-level access to the field of financial planning. 

FIN 333 Investments and Securities Analysis I (3) 

FPLN 341 Fundamentals of Financial Planning (3) 

FPLN 343 Insurance and Risk .Management (3) 

FPLN 441 Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits (3) 

FPLN 443 Estate Planning (3) 



stu- 
d to 
ides 



i 



Business Administration Program 



Business Administration Program 

OFFICE 

CBE Student Academic Services 

Stephens Hall 104,410-704-3496 

Fax:410-704-2300 

E-mail: lsawyer@towson.edu 

www.towson.edu/cbe/ 

PROGRAMS AVAILABLE 

• Major in Business Administration with concentrations or 
tracks in: 

Economics 

Finance 

Human Resource Management 

International Business 

Legal Studies 

Management 

Marketing 

• Double Major in Business Administration and Computer 
Information Systems 

• Double Major in Electronic Business and Computer 
Information Systems 

• Double Major in Electronic Business and Business 
Administration (Marketing) 

• B.A. Degree Option 

• Minor in Business Administration 

• Financial Planning Certification Preparation 

MAJOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The major in Business Administration (BUAD) requires 21 units in 
lower-level core courses, 33 units of upper-level Business core 
courses, and 21 units in one of the following concentrations or 
tracks: Economics, Finance, Human Resource Management, 
International Business, Management, Marketing, or Legal Studies. 
(Requirements for the Legal Studies Track and the Financial 
Planning Certification Preparation program are listed below. 
Requirements for the other concentrations and tracks are listed in 
their separate departments in the College of Business and 
Economics.) All major requirements must be completed with a 
grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. See the Suggested Course 
Sequence for Business Administration Majors. 

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree 
in Business Administration (BUAD) requires a minimum of 120 
earned units, which must include successful completion of the 
General Education (GenEd) requirements, the Business 
Administration major requirements listed above, and non-CBE 
electives. The non-CBE electives may include the units required for 
a minor or specialization program, or in a foreign language for the 
B.A. degree. See the complete Degree Requirements in the 
University Curriculum section in this catalog. 

During the freshman and sophomore years, pre-business admin- 
istration (PBUA) students must concentrate on building an aca- 
demic foundation as a base for the in-depth, upper-level courses. 
This foundation includes both lower-level core courses and most of 
the General Education (GenEd) requirements. Students who enroll 
in CBE courses without having fulfilled the prerequisites risk los- 
ing their place in those courses. 

Students are responsible for monitoring their own progress 
toward graduation. Students should consult with their assigned 
advisers to ensure that prerequisite courses are taken in proper 
sequence to meet the student's target completion date for the 
degree. 

Requirements for Admission to the Business Administration Major 

Students are admitted to the major in Business Administration 
(BUAD) on a competitive basis after first being admitted to the 
university. Admission to the university does not guarantee admis- 



sion to the major. Each term, the College of Business and 
Economics (CBE) Admissions Committee considers applications 
for admission to the major in the following term. In order to be 
admitted, students must satisfy the following requirements: 

1. Formal admission to TU as a degree candidate 

2. Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 or higher for all course 
work 

3. Completion of most of the lower-level General Education 
requirements (GenEds) 

4. Grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher in each lower-level core 
course 

5. Minimum average GPA of 2.70 for ALL seven lower-level core 
courses 

The minimum GPA will be reviewed each year and may be adjust- 
ed as space availability dictates. Candidates for the major must ful- 
fill the requirements in effect at the time of application. 

Pre-Business students with less than a 2.70 GPA in the seven 
lower-level CBE core courses will be subject to competitive admis- 
sion depending on space availability. 

Degree candidates intending to major in Business 
Administration are designated as "pre-Business Administration" 
(PBUA) until admitted into the BUAD major. Students are encour- 
aged to meet each term with their assigned faculty adviser to eval- 
uate their progress in completing the requirements for admission to 
the major and the degree. 

Students who take upper-level business courses before being 
admitted to the Business Administration major do so at their own 
risk, since these courses will not automatically fulfill requirements 
of other TU majors and will only be extra on the transcript. 

Application Procedure 

Students who will meet the admission requirements at the end of 
the term must complete an Application for Admission to the BUAD 
Major and a Change of Major Declaration Form before registering 
for upper-level "majors only" CBE courses (ACCT, BUSX, EBUS, 
ECON, FIN, FPLN, LEGE, MKTG, and MNGT). The forms are 
available at CBE Student Academic Services, Stephens Hall 104. 
Deadline for spring admission is October 15; summer and fall 
deadline is March 15. 

Lower-Level Core Courses (21 units) 

ACCT 201 Principles of Accounting I (or ACCT 211) (3) 

ACCT 202 Principles of Accounting II (or ACCT 212) (3) 
COSC 1 1 1 Information and Technology for Business (or 

COSC 112) (3) 
ECON 201 Microeconomics (or ECON203) (3) 
ECON 202 Macroeconomics (or ECON204) (3) 
LEGE 225 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics 1 (3) 

or 
MATH 231 Basic Statistics (or MATH 233) (3) 

Upper-Level Business Core Courses (33 units) 

BUSX 301 Business Cornerstone (3)' 

*Note: GenEd I.D. Advanced Writing Course is taken prior to or 

concurrent with BUSX 30 J. 

BUSX 460 Professional Experience (3) 

EBUS 31 1 Principles of e-Business (3) 

ECON 306 Statistics for Business and Economics II (3) 

FIN 331 Principles of Financial Management (3) 

MKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (or MKTG 342) (3) 

MNGT 337 Information Technology (3) 

MNGT 375 International Business: Theory and Practice (3) 

MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 

MNGT 365 Principles of Operations Management (3) 

MNGT 481 Business Strategy and Policy (3) 



The College of Business and Economics 



Concentrations/Tracks (21 units) 

• Economics Track 

• Finance Concentration 

• Human Resource Management Track 

• International Business Concentration 

• Legal Studies Track 

• Management Concentration 

• Marketing Concentration 

B.A. DEGREE OPTION 

A student must complete all the courses required for the major and 
a modern foreign language's intermediate courses (or equivalent). 
Students electing the Financial Planning Track within the Business 
Administration major must also complete a concentration or 
another track to meet major requirements. 

LEGAL STUDIES TRACK 

Coordinator: Benjamin Neil 
Stephens Hall 102, 410-704-2227 

To complete the major in Business Administration with the Legal 
Studies Track, students must be admitted to the Business 
Administration major (See requirements for Admission to the 
Business Administration major) before taking 21 units in Legal 
Studies and i3 units in upper-level Business core courses. All 
requirements for the major must be completed with a grade equiv- 
alent of 2.00 or higher. See the Suggested Course Sequence for 
Business Administration Majors. 

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree 
in Business Administration (BUAD) requires a minimum of 120 
earned units, which must include successful completion of the 
General Education (GenEd) requirements, the Business 
Administration major requirements listed above and electives. See 
the complete Degree Requirements in the University Curriculum 
section in this catalog. 

During the freshman and sophomore years, pre-business admin- 
istration (PBUA) students must concentrate on building an aca- 
demic foundation as a base for the in-depth, upper-level courses. 
This foundation includes both lower-level core courses and most of 
the General Education (GenEd) requirements. Students who enroll 
in CBE courses without having fulfilled the prerequisites risk los- 
ing their place in those courses. 

Students are responsible for monitoring their own progress 
toward graduation. Students should consult with their assigned 
advisers to ensure that prerequisite courses are taken in proper 
sequence to meet the student's target completion date for the 
degree. 

Legal Studies Track Required Courses (21 units) 

LEGL 226 Business Law (3) 

LEGL 326 Elder Law (3) 

LEGL 328 Cyber Law: The Law of the Internet (3) 

Four of the following: 

LEGL 325 Sports Law (3) 

LEGL 470-479 Special Topics in Legal Studies (3) 

(Topics include: Administrative Law, White Collar 
Oimes, Employment Law, Women and the Law) 

MCOM 350 Media Law (3) 

HCMN 441 Legal and Ethical Issues In Health Admmistration (3) 

POSC 209 Introduction to Law (3) 

POSC 418 Constitutional Law (3) 



FINANCIAL PLANNING CERTIFICATION PREPARATION 

Business Administration majors may pursue the following oppor- 
tunity at CBE. This 18-unit sequence offers the additional academ- 
ic course work needed to qualify to take the CFP' Certification 
Examination and provides entry-level access to the field of financial 
planning. Students electing the Financial Planning Certification 
Preparation within the Business Administration major must also 
complete a concentration or track to meet major requirements. 

ACCT361 Tax Accounting I (3) 

FIN 333 Investments and Securities Analysis I (3) 

FPLN 341 Fundamentals of Financial Planning (3) 

FPLN 343 Insurance and Risk .Management (3) 

FPLN 441 Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits (3) 

FPLN 443 Estate Planning (3) 

DOUBLE MAJOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

The Business Administration major with a second major in 
Computer Information Systems requires at least 89 units to be 
earned with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. 

Degree candidates intending to major in Business Administration 
are designated as "pre-Business" (PBUA) until admitted into the 
BUAD major. See "Requirements for Admission to the Business 
Administration Major" section of this catalog. 

Lower-Level Core Courses (21 units) 

ACCT 201/211 Accounnng Principles 1(3) 

ACCT 202/212 Accountmg Principles II (3) 

COSC 1 1 1/1 12 Information and Technology for Business (3) 

ECON 201/203 Microeconomic Principles (3) 

ECON 202/204 Macroeconomic Principles (3) 

LEGL 225 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

MATH 231/233 Basic Statistics (3) 

or 
ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics 1(3) 

Required Mathematics Courses (6-7 units) 
MATH 211 Calculus for Applications (3) 

or 
MATH 273 Calculus I (4) 

MATH 263 Discrete Math (3) 

NOTE: See Requirements for Admission to the Business Administration 
Major 

Upper-Level Business Core Courses (30 units) 

BUSX301 Business Cornerstone (3)' 

Note: GenEd l.D. Advanced Wrilmg Course is taken prior to or concurrent 

ti'ithBUSX 301. 

EBUS 311 Principles of e-Business (3) 

FIN 331 Principles of Financial Management (3) 

MKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (or MKTG 342) (3) 

MNGT 361 Principles of .Management (3) 

MNGT 365 Principles of Operations Management (3) 

MNGT 375 International Business: Theory and Practice 

BUSX460 Professional Experience (3) 

MNGT 482 Business Ethics and Society (3) 

or 
COSC 418 Ethical and Societal Concerns of Computer 

Scientists (3) (GenEd II.A.2.) 
MNGT 481 Business Strategy and Policy (3) 



3) 



CIS Project Course (3 units) 

CIS 435 Human-Computer Interaction (3) 

or 
CIS 440 Systems Development for E-Commerce (3) 

or 
CIS 475 Analysis/Design for Web Sites (3) 



Business Administration Program 



Required Course (3 units) 

ECON 306 Statistics for Business and Economics II (3) 

or 
CIS 479 Software Project Management (3) 

Computer Information Systems Requirements (26 units) 

CIS 2 1 1 Fundamentals of Information Systems and 

Technology (3) 
COSC 236 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 

cose 237 Introduction to Computer Science II (4) 

CIS 239 Computer Systems Architecture (3) 

CIS 334 Data Organization (3) 

or 
CIS 335 Advanced Business Programming (3) 

COSC 350 Data Communications and Networking (3) 

CIS 379 Systems Analysis and Design (3) 

CIS 458 Organizational Database Management (3) 

MINOR IN BUSINESS ADIVUNISTRATION (21 units) 
This minor is available to students who have a major other than 
Accounting, e-Business or Business Administration. All require- 
ments for the Business Administration minor must be completed 
with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher Students electing a 
Business Administration minor are not formally admitted to nor 
graduates of the College of Business and Economics. Students must 
complete at least 12 units of CBE courses at Towson University in 
order to earn this minor 

ACCT 201 AccountingPrmciplesI(or ACCT211) (3) 
ACCT 202 Accounting Prmciples II (or ACCT 212) (3) 
ECON 201 Microeconomic Principles (or ECON 203) (3) 
ECON 202 Macroeconomic Principles (or ECON 204) (3) 
FIN HI' Principles of Financial Management (3) 

MKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (3) 
MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 

'Prerequisites: ACCT 201/211, ACCT 202/212, ECON 201/203, ECON 
202/204, ECON 205 or .MATH 231/233. 

SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION MAJORS 

Before advancing into upper-level (300-400) CBE courses, students 
must be admitted to the Business Administration major See your 
adviser or CBE Academic Services for information. 

After completing the freshman and sophomore sequences, stu- 
dents will still need to fulfill GenEd II. A. 2 and II. C. 3 in the junior 
or senior yean Students should consult with their adviser to make 
the most appropriate elective choices. 

Students must complete at least one concentration/track from 
among Economics, Finance, Human Resource Management, 
International Business, Management, Marketing, and Legal 
Studies. 

NOTE: Based on course availability and student needs and prefer- 
ences, the selected sequences will probably vary from those pre- 
sented below. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 
First Term (IS units) 
GenEd I.A. (3) 
GenEd l.C. (3) 



MATH 231 

ECON 205 
GenEd Il.B.l. 
GenEd II.B.2.' 



(3) 



MATH 111 Algebra for Applications (prereq- 
uisite for ECON205/.MATH231) (3) 
or 

Basic Statistics (or MATH 233) (3) 
or 
Statistics for Business and Economics 1(3) 

ECON 202 Macroeconomic Principles 
(or ECON 204) (3) 



Second Term (15 units) 

GenEd I.B. COSC 1 1 1 Information and Technology for 

Business (or COSC 112) (3) 



GenEd II. D. 
Statistics 



GenEd II. A. 1. 
GenEd II.B.2.' 

GenEd I1.C.2.' 

GenEd II.C.l (3) 



ECON 205 Statistics for Business and 

Economics I (3) (unless taken) 

or 

MATH 231/233 Basic Statistics (3) (unless taken) 

or 

Lab (4) 



ECON 201" Microeconomic Principles 
(or ECON 203) (3) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 
First Term (15-16 units) 



ACCT 201 
LEGL 225 
GenEd I.E. (3) 
GenEd II.A.l. 



.'\ccounting Principles I (or .\CCT 211) (3) 
Legal Environment of Business (3) 



Lab (4) 
or 
GenEd II.A.l (3-4) 
GenEd II.B.2.'^ or GenEd II.C,2.' (3) 
* Note: The discipline for GenEd Il.B.l must be different from GenEd 
U.C.I. Only one ECON course may be used to fulfill a GenEd Il.B.l or 
U.C.I, requirement. 

Submit application for admission into the BUAD major. 

Second Term (15-16 units) 

ACCT 202 Accounnng Principles II (or ACCT 212) (3) 

GenEd l.D. Writing for Business and Industry 

(recommended) (3) 
GenEd II.A.l (3-4) 

or 
Elective (3) 
GenEd II.C.3 (3) 
ECON 306 Statistics for Business and Economics II (3) 



JUNIOR YEAR 
First Term (15 units) 

BUSX 301 

FIN 331 

MKTG 341 

MNGT 337 

MNGT 361 



Business Cornerstone (3) 

Principles of Financial Management (3) 

Principles of .Marketing (3) (or MKTG 342) 

Information Technology (3) 

Principles of Management (3) 



Second Term (IS units) 

EBUS 3 1 1 Principles of e-Business (3) 

MNGT 365 Principles of Operation Management (3) 

MNGT 375 International Business: Theory and Practice (3) 

Concentration/Track course 1 (3) 

Concentration/Track course 2 (3) 

SENIOR YEAR 
First Term (15 units) 

GenEd 1I.A.2. (if needed) or Elective (3) 
Concentration/Track course 3 (3) 
Concentration/Track course 4 (3) 
Concentration/Track course 5 (3) 
Elective (3) 

Second Term (14 units) 

BUSX 460 Professional Experience (3) 

MNGT 481 Business Strategy and Policy (3) 

Concentration/Track course 6 (3) 
Concentration/Track course 7 (3) 
Elective (2) 



GenEd II.C.2.' 
GenEd 1I.B.3 



(3) 



The College of Business and Economics 



Department of 
Economics 



Professors: James Dorn, John Egger, J. Van Fenstermaker, George 

Georgiou (Chair), Chang Kong, Louise Laurence, Kangoh Lee, 

Harvey Paul, Tamara Woroby 
Associate Professor: Timothy Sullivan 
Professors Emeriti: Bong Shin, Jeremiah German, Henry Sanborn, 

Irvin Weintraub 
Assistant Professors: Matthew Chambers, Melissa Groves, 

Jeong-Joon Lee, Jeffrey Michael, Thomas Rhoads 
Administrative Assistant: C.F. Eifert 

OFFICE 

Stephens Hall 103, 410-704-2959 
Fax: 410-704-3424 
http://w\vw. towson.edu/econ 

WHY STUDY ECONOMICS? 

• To prepare for jobs in: 

Government, such as research assistant, program analyst, 
and budget analyst. Government economists analyze economic 
conditions and estimate the economic impact of public policy. 

Business and Consulting, such as financial analyst, long- 
range planner, and stockbroker. Business economists provide 
information on market conditions, forecasting, government reg- 
ulations, facilities planning, product planning and pricing. 

• To prepare for graduate school in such programs as Law, 
Economics, Public Policy, or Business Journalism 

• To earn a double major in Geography and Environmental 
Planning, Mathematics or Political Science 

• To blend business and economics by taking either an 
Economics major with a Business Administration minor or a 
Business Administration major with a track in Economics 

• To have the ability to analyze the American economic system 
and international and domestic economic forces that determine 
production, prices, profits and incomes. 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The department is committed to an excellent economics education 
built on a comprehensive liberal arts foundation to enable gradu- 
ates to excel as leaders in a dynamic business environment and/or 
a career in public service by means of individualized student advis- 
ing, professional work experience, teaching excellence, and com- 
mitment to the highest academic and ethical standards. 

DISTINCTIVE FEATURES 

• MARYLAND COUNCIL ON ECONOMIC EDUCATION 
(MCEE) 

— responsible for increasing the quality and quantity of 
economics taught in Maryland schools, colleges and the 
general community 

— Institutional Advancement Division affiliate 

— Council President: Michael Moiioy, principal, Deutsche Banc 
Alex. Brown, Inc. 

— Council Executive Director: Carol Jarvis, Ph.D. 

• CENTER FOR ECONOMIC EDUCATION 

• One of nine Maryland college- or university-based centers 
responsible for 

— consulting with educational and community 
organizations 

— developing economic education materials 

— improving economics instructional programs 

— conducting research in economic education 



• Director: Melissa Groves, Ph.D. 

• Student Recognition Awards 

— Federal Reserve Bank Excellence Award 

— The Wall Street Journal Award 

— J.J. German Scholarship 

— Catherine Britt Memorial Scholarship 

— Economics Club 

— Omicron Delta Epsilon, Economics Honor Society 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Major in Economics 

Major in Business Administration: Economics Track 

Double Major m Economics and Geography and Environmental 

Planning 
Double Major in Economics and Mathematics 
Double Major in Economics and Political Science 
Minor in Economics 

MAJOR IN ECONOMICS 

The major in Economics requires 33 units in Economics, complet- 
ed with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. (See the Suggested 
Course Sequence for Economics Majors.) 

Transfer students must take a minimum of 15 units in econom- 
ics at Towson University to qualify for an Economics major. 

Core Courses (33 units) 

ECON 201 Microcconomic Principles (or Honors ECON 203) (3) 

ECON 202 Macrocconomic Principles (or Honors ECON 204) (3) 

ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics (3) 

ECON 306 Statistics for Business and Economics II (3) 

ECON 309 Intermediate Price Theory (3) 

ECON 310 Macroeconomic Theory (3) 

One 400-level economics course (excluding ECON 495 and ECON 497) 

Elective Courses (12 units) 

Four upper-level economics electives (ECON 305 cannot count as an elec- 
tive). 

Only one Internship in Economics (ECON 497) will count toward the 
major. 

The department allows any one of the following courses outside the 
department to count toward the major in satisfying electives: 
FIN 332 Advanced Financial Management (3) 

MATH 377 Mathematical Models (3) 
POSC 459 Simulation and Games in Political Science (3) 

Recommended Courses for Graduate School • 

The following courses are recommended for students considering 
graduate school in Economics: ECON 401, ECON 451, 
MATH 273, MATH 274, MATH 275 and MATH 463. | 

MAJOR IN BUSDvJESS ADMINISTRATION — 
ECONOMICS TRACK 

Students in this track complete the major in Business 
Administration and 21 units in Economics, listed below. The 
Business Administration requirements include 21 units in lower- 
level core courses and 33 units in upper-level Business core courses. 
All major requirements must be completed with a grade equivalent 
of 2.00 or higher. See the Suggested Course Sequence for Business 
Administration Majors. 

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree 
in Business Administration (BUAD) requires a minimum of 120 
earned units, which must mclude successful completion of the 
General Education (GenEd) requirements, the Business 
Administration major requirements listed above, and electives. See 
the complete Degree Requirements in the University Curriculum 
section in this catalog. 

During the freshman and sophomore years, pre-business admin- 
istration (PBUA) students must concentrate on building an aca- 
demic foundation as a base for the in-depth, upper-level courses. 



Department of Economics 



This foundation includes both lower-level BUAD core courses and 
most of the General Education (GenEd) requirements. Students 
who enroll in upper-level CBE courses without having fulfilled the 
prerequisites risk losing their place in those courses. 

Students are responsible for monitoring their own progress 
toward graduation. Students should consult with their assigned 
advisers to ensure that prerequisite courses are taken in proper 
sequence to meet the student's target completion date for the 
degree. 

Requirements for Admission to the Business 
Administration Major 

Students must be eligible for admission to the Business 
Administration major to enroll in upper-level Business core and 
concentration/track courses. To be eligible, students must complete 
the seven specific lower-level core courses with a grade equivalent 
of 2.00 or higher and a minimum GPA of 2.70 for ALL seven 
lower-level core courses. (See admission requirements in the 
Business Administration major section of this catalog.) 

Lower-Level Core Courses (21 units) 
ACCT 201 Accounting Principles I (or ACCT 211) (3) 
ACCT 202 Accounnng Principles II (or ACCT 212) (3) 
cose 111 Information and Technology for Business 

(or cose 112) (3) 
ECON 201 Microeconomic Principles (or ECON 203) (3) 
ECON 202 Macroeconomic Principles (or ECON 204) (3) 
ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics I (3) 

or 
MATH 231 Basic Statistics (or MATH 233) (3) 
LEGE 225 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

Upper-Level Business Core Courses (33 units) 

BUSX301 Business Cornerstone (3)* 

^NOTE: GetiEd I.D. Advanced Writing course is taken prior to or con- 
current with BUSX 301. 
BUSX 460 Professional Experience (3) 
EBUS 311 Principles of e-Business (3) 
ECON 306 Statistics for Business and Economics II (3) 
FIN 331 Principles of Financial Management (3) 
.\IKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (or MKTG 342) (3) 
MNGT 337 Information Technology (3) 
MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 
MNGT 365 Principles of Operations Management (3) 
MNGT 375 Internanonal Business: Theory and Practice (3) 
MNGT 481 Business Strategy and Policy (3) 

Economics Track Required Courses (21 units) 

ECON 309 Intermediate Price Theory (3) 
ECON 310 Macroeconomic Theory (3) 
ECON 313 Money and Banking (3) 
ECON XXX Upper-level Electives (9) 

Recommended as one elective: ECON 409 
MNGT 482 Business Ethics and Society (3) 
NOTE: ECON 306 and ECON 497 cannot count as electives. 

DOUBLE MAJORS 

The Department of Economics offers three double major pro- 
grams: (1) Economics and Mathematics, (2) Economics and 
Geography and Environmental Planning, and (3) Economics and 
Political Science. A student majoring in economics may declare a 
second major and obtain a degree certifying that both majors have 
been completed. 



DOUBLE MAJOR IN ECONOMICS AND 
MATHEMATICS 

The Economics major with a second major in Mathematics 
requires 70-72 units completed with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or 
higher in all major courses. 

Core Courses (55 units) 

COSC 236 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 

ECON 201 Microeconomic Principles (or ECON 203) (3) 

ECON 202 Macroeconomic Principles (or ECON 204) (3) 

ECON 306 Statistics for Business and Economics II (3) 

ECON 309 Intermediate Price Theory (3) 

ECON 310 Macroeconomic Theory (3) 

ECON 451 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

MATH 265 Elementary Linear Algebra (4) 

MATH 267 Introduction to Abstract Mathematics (4) 

MATH 273 Calculus I (4) 

MATH 274 Calculus II (4) 

MATH 275 Calculus III (4) 

MATH 331 Probability (4) 

MATH 332 Mathematical Statistics (4) 

MATH 377 Mathematical Models (3) 

MATH 490 Senior Seminar in Mathematics (2) 

Upper-Level Economics Electives (6 units) 

Tivo additioual courses to be chosen in economics. 

Upper-Level Mathematics Electives (9-11 units) 

Two courses from the foUowmg: 
MATH 374 Differential Equations (3) 
MATH 435 Numerical Analysis I (3) 
MATH 436 Numerical Analysis II (3) 
MATH 437 Operations Research (4) 

And one course from the following: 

MATH 367 

MATH 451 

MATH 467 

MATH 473 

MATH 475 

MATH 477 



Theory of Numbers (3) 
Graph Theory (3) 
Algebraic Structures (4) 
Introduction to Real Analysis (4) 
Complex Analysis (3) 
Topology (3) 



DOUBLE MAJOR IN ECONOMICS AND 
GEOGRAPHY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING 

Completion of individual majors in Geography and Environmental 
Planning and Economics requires the successful completion of 72 
units (39 geography and environmental planning and ii in eco- 
nomics). However, by electing the double major in Geography and 
Environmental Planning and Economics, students will be able to 
complete both majors with a total of 60 units. 

In Economics, students must complete all requirements for the 
major. However, for the first statistics requirement, they may 
choose either: 
ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics I (3) 

or 
GEOG 375 Quantitative Methods in Geography (3) 

In addition, they may substitute two of the following upper-level 
courses in geography and environmental planning toward fulfill- 
ment of the required four courses of upper-level economic elec- 
tives: 

GEOG 355 Historical Geography of Urbanization (3) 

GEOG 381 

GEOG 385 

GEOG 391 

GEOG 393 

GEOG 405 



Political Geography (3) 

Population Geography (3) 

Urban Systems (3) 

Transportation and Infrastructure Planning (3) 

Comprehensive Planning 



GEOG 427 The Global Economy (3) 



The College of Business and Economics 



GEOG470-479 Seminar: Selected Topics in Geography* (3) 
GEOG 481 Environmental Impact Analysis (3) 
GEOG4S4 Land Use Planning (3) 

* Requires approval from Department of Economics depending on course 
topic. 

In Geography and Environmental Planning, students must com- 
plete all requirements for the major noting the option of either 
ECON 205 or GEOG 375 for their first statistics requirement. In 
addition, they may substitute two of the following upper-level 
courses in economics toward fulfillment of the required upper-level 
elective courses in geography and environmental planning: 

ECON 323 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

ECON 325 Economic Development (3) 

ECON 333 Poverty and Discrimination (3) 

ECON 351 Urban Economics (3) 

ECON 421 International Economics (3) 

ECON 423 International Monetary Theory and Policy (3) 

ECON 470-479 Topics in Economics* (3) 

^Requires approval from the Department of Geography and Environmental 

Planning depending on course topic. 

DOUBLE MAJOR IN ECONOMICS AND 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Completion of individual majors in Political Science and 
Economics requires the successful completion of 69 units (36 in 
political science and 33 in economics). However, by electing the 
double major in Political Science and Economics, students will be 
able to complete both majors with a total of 57 units. 

In Economics, students must complete all core courses for the 
major. However, they may substitute two of the following upper- 
level courses in political science toward fulfillment of the required 
four courses of upper-level economic electives: 

POSC 305 Urban Government and Politics (3) 

POSC 375 Public Administration (3) 

POSC 421 Politics and Environmental Policy (3) 

POSC 459 Simulation and Games m Political Science (3) 

POSC 467 Polincs and the Budgeting Process (3) 

POSC470-479 Special Topics* (3) 

POSC 482 Seminar in Political Science (3) 

' Requires approval from the Department of Economics depending on 

course topic. 

In Political Science, students must complete all requirements for 
the major. However, they may substitute two of the following 
upper-level courses in economics toward fulfillment of the required 
eight upper-level courses in political science: 

ECON 323 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

ECON 325 Economic Development (3) 

ECON 33 1 Government and Economic Life (3) 

ECON 337 Public Finance (3) 

ECON 339 Health Economics (3) 

ECON 351 Urban Economics (3) 

ECON 375 Environmental Economics (3) 

ECON 421 International Economics (3) 

ECON 423 International Monetary Theory and Policy (3) 

ECON 470-479 Topics in Economics* (3) 

* Requires approval from the Department of Political Science depending on 
course topic. 

MINOR IN ECONOMICS (18 units) 

The Economics minor may be taken with any other major. All 
Economics courses must be completed with a grade equivalent of 
2.00 or higher. 

Core Courses (6 units) 

ECON 201 Microeconomic Principles (3) 

ECON 202 Macroeconomic Principles (3) 



Elective Courses (12 units) 

ECON XXX Upper-level Electives (12) 

NOTE: ECON 305 cannot count as an elective. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS IN ECONOMICS 

Students majoring in Economics are eligible to apply to the 
Departmental Honors Program if they have a 3.25 cumulative 
GPA, a 3.50 GPA in Economics classes, and the consent of a facul- 
ty thesis adviser. Students interested in Departmental Honors 
should obtain the application form from the department chair or 
honors coordinator before the end of their junior year. Honors in 
Economics requires 36 units in Economics (18 core units, 9 units of 
ECON electives, and 9 units required for Honors). The 9 unit 
requirement for Departmental Honors includes: a) one of the fol- 
lowing: ECON 321 (History of Economic Thought), ECON 401 
(Econometrics), or ECON 451 (Mathematical Economics); b) 3 
units of ECON 495 (Independent Studv); and c) ECON 499 
(Honors Thesis). ECON 495 and ECON 499 must be taken 
sequentially. The thesis must be presented orally to the Thesis 
Committee at a public colloquium. Honors are designated on the 
graduate's transcript and diploma. 

SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR ECONOMICS 
MAJORS 

Students should consult with their advisers to make the most 
appropriate elective choices. Based on course availability and stu- 
dent needs and preferences, the selected sequences may vary from 
those presented below. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 
First Term (15 units) 

ECON 201 Microeconomic Principles (Honors ECON 203) (3) 

GenEd(12) 
Second Term (15 units) 

ECON 202 .Macroeconomic Principles (Honors ECON 204) (3) 

GenEd(12) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 
First Term (15 units) 

ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics I (3) 

ECON 309 Intermediate Price Theory (3) 

GenEd (9) 
Second Term (15 units) 

ECON 306 Statistics for Business and Economics II (3) 

ECON 310 .Macroeconomic Theory (3) 

Electives (9) 

JUNIOR YEAR 
First Term (15 units) 
ECON 323 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

or 
ECON 325 Economic Development (3) 

or 
ECON 333 Poverf)' and Discrimination (3) 
ECON Elective (3) 

Electives (9) 
Second Term (15 units) 
ECON Elective (3) 

Electives (12) 

SENIOR YEAR 

First Term (15 units) 

ECON 4xx Elective (3) 

GenEd II.A.2 (3) 

Electives (9) 
Second Term ( 1 5 units) 

ECON Elective (3) 

Electives (12) 



Department of Finance 



Department of Finance 

Professors: M. Tom Basurav (Chair). Albert Avervv Alan 

Grimshaw, Bharat Jain, Daniel Singer 
Associate Professors: Babu Baradwaj,Gary Powell, 

Moon-Whoan Rhee 
Assistarit Professor: L\nne Kelly 
Administratii'e Assistant: Darlene Danaher 

OFFICE 

Stephens Hall 314, 410-704-2465 
Fax: 410-704-3454 
http://www.towson.edu/finance/ 

WHY STUDY finance; 

• To prepare for positions in managerial finance, banking, insur- 
ance, and securities industries 

• To become proficient in applying financial tools to investment 
and financing decisions 

• To develop analytical skills that can be used throughout a busi- 
ness career 

• To buiJd a solid foundation for making personal financial deci- 
sions 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The mission of the Depanment of Finance is to produce finance 
graduates who possess the knowledge, skills and abilities necessat)' 
to function effectively in the financial community. The depart- 
ment's aim is to develop students who are competent, ethical, and 
capable of meeting the challenges of an increasingly complex, glob- 
al environment. 

GOALS 

The goals of the department are: ( 1 ) to achieve excellence in teach- 
ing while offering students a curriculum based on leading-edge 
financial skills and techniques, (2) to increase the body of knowl- 
edge in the finance professions through applied scholarship activi- 
ties, and (3) to provide applied research, consulting and advisory 
services to the business and professional community. 

DISTTNCTFVE FEATURES 

• FMA (Student Chapter of Financial Management Association) 

• F.VIA Honor Societ>' 

• Wall Street Investment Club 

• Internships in Finance 

• Student Recognition Award 

— Kathr\n H. Gerling Scholarship 

MAJOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION — 
FINANCE CONCEIVTRATION 

Students in the Finance Concentration complete the major in 
Business Administration and 21 units in Finance. The Business 
Administration requirements include 21 units in lower-level core 
courses and 33 units in upper-level Business core courses, as listed 
below. All major requirements must be completed with a grade 
equivalent of 2.00 or higher. See the Suggested Course Sequence for 
Business Administration Majors. 

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree 
in Business Administration (BUAD) requires a minimum of 120 
earned units, which must include successful completion of the 
General Education (GenEd) requirements, the Business 
Administration major requirements listed below and electives. See 
the complete Degree Requirements in the University Curriculum 
section in this catalog. 

During the freshman and sophomore years, pre-business admin- 
istration (PBUA) students must concentrate on building an aca- 
demic foundation as a base for the in-depth, upper-level courses. 
This foundation includes both lower-level core courses and most of 



the General Education (GenEd) requirements. Students who enroll 
in CBE courses without having fulfilled the prerequisites risk los- 
ing their place in those courses. 

Students are responsible for monitoring their own progress 
toward graduation. Students should consult with their assigned 
advisers to ensure that prerequisite courses are taken in proper 
sequence to meet the student's target completion date for the 
degree. 

Requirements for Admission to the Business Administration Major 

Students must be eligible for admission to the Business 
Administration major to enroll in upper-level Business core and 
concentration/track courses. To be eligible, students must com- 
plete the seven specific lower-level core courses with a grade equiv- 
alent of 2.00 or higher and a minimum GPA of 2.70 for ALL seven 
lower-level core courses. (See admission requiratBits in the 
Business Administration major section of this catalog.) 

Lower-Level Core Courses (21 units) 
ACCT 201 Accounting Principles I (or ACCT 211) (3) 
ACCT 202 .Jiccounting Principles II (or ACCT 212) (3) 
cose 111 Information and Technology for Business 

(or cose 112) (3) 
ECON 201 Microeconomic Principles (or ECON 203) (3) 
ECON 202 Macroeconomic Principles (or ECON 204) (3) 
ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics 1 (3) 

or 
MATH 231 Basic Statistics (or MATH 233) (3) 
LEGE 225 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

Upper-Level Business Core Courses (33 units) 

BUSX301 Business Cornerstone (3)' 

'NOTE: GenEd I.D. Advanced Writing course is taken prior to or con- 
current with BUSX 301. 
BUSX 460 Professional Experience (3) 

EBUS 311 Principles of e-Business (3) 

ECON 306 Statistics for Business and Economics II (3) 
FIN 331 Principles of Financial .Management (3) 

.MKTG 341 Principles of .Marketing (or .MKTG 342) (3) 
MNGT 337 Information Technologj' (3) 
MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 
MNGT 365 Principles of Operations .Management (3) 
MNGT 375 International Business: Theory and Practice (3) 
.MNGT 481 Business Strategy and Policy (3) 

Finance Concentrarion (21 units) 

FIN 332 .\dvanced Financial .Management (3) 

FIN 333 Investments and Security Analysis I (3) 

FIN 423 Investments and Security Analysis II (3) 

FEN 430 Capital Markets and Management of Financial 

Institutions (3) 
FIN 435 International Finance (3) 

FIN 439 Financial Policy (3) 

.MNGT 482 Business Ethics and Society- (3) 

FINANCIAL PLANMNG CERTfflCATION PREPARATION 

A 15-unit sequence offers students majoring in Business 
Administration in the Finance concentration the additional aca- 
demic course work needed to qualif\- to take the CFP' Certification 
Examination and provides entry-level access to the field of finan- 
cial planning. 

ACCT 361 Tax Accounting I (3) 

FPLN 341 Fundamentals of Financial Planning (3) 

FPLN 343 Insurance and Risk Management (3) 

FPLN 441 Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits (3) 

FPLN 443 Estate Planmng (3) 



The College of Business and Economics 



Department of Management 

Professors: Tom Basuray, Jeffrey Mello (Chair), Barin Nag, 

Douglas Ross, Precha Thavikiilwat 
Associate Professors: William Darrow, Deborah Kidder, James 

Otto, Sharma Pillutla, William Smith, Filiz Tabak 
Assistant Professors: Donald Kopka, Douglas Sanford, Dong 

Qing Yao 
Instructor: Laurence Burgee 
Senior Lecturer: Don McCulloh 
Administrative Assistant: Carol Lindsay 

OFFICES 

Stephens Hall 1 16, 410-704-2934 

Fax: 410-704-3236 

E-mail: clindsay@towson.edu 

http://www.towson.edu/cbe/Department/Management/ 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The mission of the Department of Management is to provide grad- 
uates with the knowledge, skills and attitudes to be successful man- 
agers in a variety of organizational settings. We seek to develop 
graduates with global perspectives, ethical grounding, technologi- 
cal competency and a desire for life-long learning. 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Management offers the following programs: 
The major in Business Administration with 

• Management Concentration 

• Human Resource Management Track 

• International Business Concentration 

WHY STUDY MANAGEMENT? 

The rapid and continuous changes taking place in our global econ- 
omy require skilled managers and leaders to ensure not only effec- 
tive performance but survival. Organizations of all sizes in all sec- 
tors of our economy face unprecedented challenges that require 
informed, strategic decision-making and principled leadership. 

The programs of study in management are designed to allow stu- 
dents to develop the critical marketable skills that employers seek. 
Courses and programs of study within the department emphasize 
the development of global awareness, ethical decision-making, 
technological competency and ongoing personal and professional 
development. Ongoing curricula development ensures that course 
offerings and content reflect the current practices used and chal- 
lenges faced by organizations. Because management is a broad 
field of study, the concentration in human resource management, 
international business and general management offer students a 
flexible course of study that can be individualized to meet their spe- 
cific career objectives. 

Regardless of concentration area, all students who major in 
management will find several recurring themes in their course 
work: 

• the impact of technology on management practices 

• an awareness and understanding of the global environment in 
which organizations operate and managers make decisions 

• legal and ethical dilemmas faced by managers in carrying out 
their responsibilities 

MAJOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION — 
MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION 

Students in the Management Concentration complete the major in 
Business Administration and 21 units in Management. 

The Business Administration requirements include 21 units in 
lower-level core courses, and 33 units in upper-level Business core 
courses, as listed below. All major requirements must be complet- 
ed with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. See the Suggested 
Course Sequence for Business Administration Majors. 



The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree 
in Business Administration (BUAD) requires a minimum of 120 
earned units, which must include successful completion of the 
General Education (GenEd) requirements, the Business 
Administration major requirements listed above, and electives. See 
the complete Degree Requirements in the University Curriculum 
section in this catalog. 

During the freshman and sophomore years, pre-business admin- 
istration (PBUA) students must concentrate on building an aca- 
demic foundation as a base for the in-depth, upper-level courses. 
This foundation includes both lower-level BUAD core courses and 
most of the General Education (GenEd) requirements. Students 
who enroll in CBE courses without having fulfilled the prerequi- 
sites risk losing their place in those courses. 

Students are responsible for monitoring their own progress 
toward graduation. Students should consult with their assigned 
advisers to ensure that prerequisite courses are taken in proper 
sequence to meet the student's target completion date for the 
degree. 

Requirements for Admission to the Business 
Administration Major 

Students must be eligible for admission to the Business 
Administration major to enroll in upper-level core and concentra- 
tion/track courses. To be eligible, students must complete the seven 
specific lower-level core courses with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or 
higher and a minimum GPA of 2.70 for ALL seven lower-level core 
courses. (See admission requirements in the Business 
Administration major section of this catalog.) 

Lower-Level Core Courses (21 units) 

ACCT 201 Accounting Principles 1 (or ACCT 211) (3) 

ACCT 202 Accounnng Principles II (or ACCT 212) (3) 

LEGL 225 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

cose 11 1 Information and Technology for Business (3) 

(or cose 112) 
ECON 201 Microeconomic Principles (or ECON 203) (3) 
ECON 202 Macroeconomic Principles (or ECON 204) (3) 
ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics 1 (3) 

or 
MATH 231 Basic Statistics (or MATH 233) (3) 

Upper-Level Business Core Courses {33 units) 
BUSX 301 Business Cornerstone (3)* 

Note: GenEd I.D. Advanced Writing Course is taken prior to or concur- 
rent with BUSX 301. 

BUSX 460 Professional Experience (3) 

EBUS 311 Principles of e-Biisiness (3) 

ECON 306 Statistics for Business and Economics 11 (3) 
FIN 331 Principles of Financial Management (3) 

MKTG341 Principles of Marketing (or MKTG 342) (3) 
MNGT 337 Information Technology (3) 
MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 
MNGT 365 Principles of Operations Management (3) 
MNGT 375 International Business: Theory and Practice (3) 
.MNGT 481 Business Strategy and Policy (3) 

Management Concentration (21 units) 

MNGT 381 lluni.m Resource Management (3) 

MNGT 421 Management of Organizational Behavior (3) 

MNGT 443 Project Management (3) 

MNGT 482 Business Ethics and Society (3) 

Three MNGT electwcs selected from: 

MNGT 419 Supply-Chain Management (3) 

MNGT 423 Service Operations Management (3) 

MNGT 425 Organizational Theory and Development (3) 

MNGT 433 C^ompcnsation and Benefits (3) 

MNGT 438 Multinational Management and Culture (3) 

MNGT 451 Industrial Relations (3) 

MNGT 453 Conflict Resolution in Business (3) 



Department of Management 



MNGT 455 Entrepreneurship and Small Business (3) 

iMNGT461 Total Quality Management (3) 

MNGT 463 Organizational Leadership (3) 

MNGT 470-479 Special Topics in Management (3) 

MNGT 491 Directed Readings (3) 

MNGT 495 Independent Research (3) 

MNGT 497 Management Internship (3) 

MNGT 498 Practicum in Management (3) 

NOTE: Only 3 units of the MNGT 497 or 498 courses can be applied to 

the Management Concentration requirement. 

MAJOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION — 
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT TRACK 

The Human Resource Management Track is designed to pre- 
pare students to apply their knowledge and skills for manageri- 
al positions in a human resource department. Students in the 
Human Resource Management Track complete the major in 
Business Administration and 21 units in Human Resource 
Management. The Business Administration requin^ments 
include 21 units in lower-level core courses, and 33 units in 
upper-level Business core courses, as listed below. All major 
requirements must be completed with a grade equivalent of 2.00 
or higher. See the Suggested Course Sequence for Business 
Administration Majors. 

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) 
degree in Business Administration (BUAD) requires a minimum 
of 120 earned units, which must include successful completion 
of the General Education (GenEd) requirements, the Business 
Administration major requirements listed above, and electives. 
See the complete Degree Requirements in the University 
Curriculum section in this catalog. 

During the freshman and sophomore years, pre-business 
administration (PBUA) students must concentrate on building 
an academic foundation as a base for the in-depth, upper-level 
courses. This foundation includes both lower-level core courses 
and most of the General Education (GenEd) requirements. 
Students who enroll in CBE courses without having fulfilled the 
prerequisites risk losing their place in those courses. 

Students are responsible for monitoring their own progress 
toward graduation. Students should consult with their assigned 
advisers to ensure that prerequisite courses are taken in proper 
sequence to meet the student's target completion date for the 
degree. 

Requirements for Admission to the Business 
Administration Major 

Students must be eligible for admission to the Business 
Administration major to enroll in upper-level Business core and 
concentration/track courses. To be eligible, students must 
complete the seven specific lower-level core courses with a grade 
equivalent of 2.00 or higher and a minimum GPA of 2.70 for 
ALL seven lower-level core courses. (See admission require- 
ments in the Business Administration major section of this cata- 
log.) 

Lower-Level Core Courses (21 units) 

ACCT 201 Principles of Accounting I (or ACCT 21 1 ) (3) 

ACCT 202 Prmciples of Accounting II (or ACCT 212) (3) 

cose 1 1 1 Information and Technology for Business (3) 

ECON 201 Microeconomics (or ECON 203) (3) 

ECON 202 Macroeconomics (or ECON 204) (3) 

LEGL 225 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics I (3) 

or 
MATH 231 Basic Statistics (3) (or MATH 233) 



Upper-Level Business Core Courses (33 units) 

BUSX 301 Business Cornerstone (3)' 

Note: GenEd I.D. Adi-anced Writing course is taken prior to or concurrent 

with BUSX 301. 

BUSX 460 Professional Experience (3) 

EBUS 3 1 1 Principles of e-Business (3) 

ECON 306 Statistics for Business and Economics II (3) 

FIN 331 Principles of Financial .Management (3) 

MKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (or MKTG 342) (3) 

MNGT 337 Information Technology (3) 

MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 

MNGT 365 Principles of Operations Management (3) 

MNGT 375 International Business: Theory and Practice (3) 

MNGT 481 Business Strategy and Policy (3) 

Human Resource Management Track Required Courses 

(21 units) 

MNGT 381 Human Resources Management (3) 

MNGT 421 Management of Organizational Behavior (3) 

MNGT 433 Compensation and Benefits (3) 

MNGT 438 Multinational Management and Culture (3) 

MNGT 463 Organizational Leadership (3) 

MNGT 482 Business Ethics and Societ)' (3) 

One elective selected from: 

MNGT 425 Organizational Theory and Development (3) 

.MNGT 443 Project Management (3) 

MNGT 451 Industrial Relations (3) 

MNGT 453 Conflict Resolution in Business (3) 

MNGT 470-479 Special Topics in .Management (3) 

MNGT 491 Directed Readings (3) 

MNGT 495 Independent Research (3) 

MNGT 497 Management Internship (3) 

PSYC 327 Industrial Psychology (3) 

MAJOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION- 
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS CONCENTRATION 

The International Business Concentration is an interdisciplinary 
program comprising courses drawn from disciplines within the 
CBE. Students complete the major in Business Administration 
and 21 units in the International Business Concentration 
requirements. 

The Business Administration requirements include 21 units in 
lower-level core courses and ji units in upper-level Business 
core courses, as listed below. All major requirements must be 
completed with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. See the 
Suggested Course Sequence for Business Administration 
Majors. 

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) 
degree in Business Administration (BUAD) requires a minimum 
of 120 earned units, which must include successful completion 
of the General Education (GenEd) requirements, the Business 
Administration major requirements listed above, and electives. 
See the complete Degree Requirements in the University 
Curriculum section in this catalog. 

During the freshman and sophomore years, pre-business 
administration (PBUA) students must concentrate on building 
an academic foundation as a base for the in-depth, upper-level 
courses. This foundation includes both lower-level core courses 
and most of the General Education (GenEd) requirements. 
Students who enroll in CBE courses without having fulfilled the 
prerequisites risk losing their place in those courses. 

Students are responsible for monitoring their own progress 
toward graduation. Students should consult with their assigned 
advisers to ensure that prerequisite courses are taken in proper 
sequence to meet the student's target completion date for the 
degree. 



The College of Business and Economics 



Requirements for Admission to the Business 
Administration Major 

Students must be eligible for admission to the Business 
Administration major to enroll in upper-level core and concen- 
tration/track courses. To be eligible, students must complete 
the seven specific lower-level core courses with a grade equiva- 
lent of 2.00 or higher and a minimum GPA of 2.70 for ALL 
seven lower-level core courses. (See admission requirements in 
the Business Administration major section of this catalog.) 

Lower-Level Core Courses (21 units) 
ACCT 201 Accounting Principles I (or ACCT 211) (3) 
.^CCT 202 Accounting Principles II (or ACCT 212) (3) 
LEGL 225 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

cose 1 1 1 Information and Technology for Business 

(or cose 112) (3) 
ECON 201 Microeconomic Principles (or ECON 203) (3) 
ECON 202 Macroeconomic Principles (or ECON 204) (3) 
ECON 205 Statistics for Busmess and Economics I (3) 

or 
MATH 23 1 Basic Statistics (or MATH 233) (3) 

Upper-Level Business Core Courses (33 units) 

BUSX 301 Business Cornerstone (3)* 

Note: GenEd l.D. Advanced Writing course is taken prior to or concurrent 

with BUSX 301. 

BUSX 460 Professional Experience (3) 

EBUS 311 Principles of e-Business (3) 

ECON 306 Statistics for Business and Economics II (3) 

FIN 331 Principles of Financial Management (3) 

MKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (or MKTG 342) (3) 

MNGT 337 Information Technology (3) 

MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 

MNGT 365 Principles of Operations Management (3) 

MNGT 375 International Business: Theory and Practice (3) 

MNGT 481 Busmess Strategy and Policy (3) 



International Business Concentration (21 units) 

FIN 435 International Finance (3) 

MKTG 445 International Marketmg (3) 

MNGT 438 Multinational Management and Culture (3) 

MNGT 482 Business Ethics and Society (3) 

or 
PHIL 371 Business Ethics (3) 

Three courses (total of 9 units) to develop an understanding of the socio- 
cultural, philosophical and political environments of foreign countries or 
regions, selected from the following: [Appro\al by the appropriate depart- 
ment may be needed depending upon the student's qualifications.) 

Foreign Language (a maximum of 9 intermediate-level or above units) 

or 

Cross-cultural course work (a maximum of 9 units) 

ANTH 368 Development and Industrialization: Cross Cultural 

Perspective (3) 
ECON 325 Economic Development (3) 

or 
ECON 421 International Economics (3) 
GEOG 357 Cultural Geography (3) 
GEOG 427 Global Economy (3) 

or 
GEOG XXX Upper-level regional geography to complement similar 

history; e.g., GEOG 431 Geography of Africa 
HIST 479 History of Diplomacy (3) 

or 
HIST XXX Upper-level modem regional/country history; 

e.g., HIST 328 History of East Africa 1820 to the Present 
MKTG/MNGT 479 Special Topics (if include travel and study abroad) 
PHIL 357 Topics in Comparative Religion (3) 

or 
PHIL XXX Upper-level country philosophy to complement similar 

history; e.g., PHIL 302 Philosophies of China and Japan 
POSC 307 Contemporary International Politics (3) 

POSC 339 Comparative Political Systems (3) 

or 
POSC XXX Upper-level country political science to complement 

HIST or GEOG; e.g., POSC 341 African Government 

and Politics 
POSC 341 African Government and Politics (3) 




Department of Marketing and e-Business 



Department of Marketing and 
e-Business 

Chair: Rodney Stump 

Professors: William Grazer, Garland Keesling, Thomas 

Maronick, Louise Smith 
Associate Professors: Allan Miller, Richard Rosecky 
Assistant Professor: Gewei Ye 
Lecturer: Laleh Malek 
Administrative Assistant: Diane Hornbuckle 

OFFICE 

Stephens Hall 123, 410-704-3351 

Fax:410-704-3772 

E-mail: dhornbuckle@towson.edu 

http: //www.towson.edu/marketing/ 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The Department of Marketing and e-Business is committed to 
an excellent broad-based education in marketing and e-business 
that enables students to excel in positions of responsibility and 
leadership in a dynamic business environment by means of: 

• Dedication to students and personalized service 

• Teaching excellence 

• Involvement with businesses, nonprofit organizations, and gov- 
ernment 

• Commitment to the highest ethical standards 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Marketing and e-Business offers the follow- 
ing programs: 

• The major in Business Administration with a Marketing 
Concentration 

• The major in Business Administration with a Marketing 
Concentration and Mass Communication Interdisciplinary 
Specialization 

• The major in Electronic Business 

• The major in e-Business with the Financial Planning Track 

• The double major in e-Business and Computer Information 
Systems 

• The double major in e-Business and Business Administration 
(Marketing) 

WHY STUDY MARKETING? 

To prepare for )obs that comprise 25 to 33 percent of all civil- 
ian jobs. Entry-level jobs for college graduates include assistant 
product manager, sales representative, assistant store manager, 
research trainee, retail management trainee, customer service 
representative, assistant media buyer, assistant merchandiser, 
promotion and public relations assistant, and marketing 
trainee. 

To understand the essential element that links all businesses 
with their customers. All people have needs. All companies 
want to satisfy those needs. Marketers are customer-driven 
business persons. 

To help generate company profits while holding a fast-paced, 
visible, dynamic, desirable and well-paid position. All business 
planning starts and ends with marketing. 

DISTDsfCTTVE FEATURES 

• American Marketing Association Student Chapter 

• The James Dunbar Jr. Endowment Memorial Scholarship 

• Outstanding Marketing Graduate Award 

• .Marketing internships with prestigious organizations 

• Electronic Business Association Student Organization 



MAJOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION — 
MARKETING CONCENTRATION 

Students in the Marketing Concentration complete the major in 
Business Administration and 21 units in Marketing. 

The Business Administration requirements include 21 units 
in lower-level core courses and 33 units in upper-level Business 
core courses, as listed below. All major requirements must be 
completed with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. See the 
Suggested Course Sequence for Business Administration 
Majors. 

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) 
degree in Business Administration (BUAD) requires a minimum 
of 120 earned units, which must include successful completion 
of the General Education (GenEd) requirements, the Business 
Administration major requirements listed above, and electives. 
See the complete Degree Requirements in the University 
Curriculum section in this catalog. 

During the freshman and sophomore years, pre-business 
administration (PBUA) students must concentrate on building 
an academic foundation as a base for the in-depth, upper-level 
courses. This foundation includes both lower-level core courses 
and most of the General Education (GenEd) requirements. 
Students who enroll in CBE courses without having fulfilled the 
prerequisites risk losing their place in those courses. 

Students are responsible for monitoring their own progress 
toward graduation. Students should consult with their assigned 
advisers to ensure that prerequisite courses are taken in proper 
sequence to meet the student's target completion date for the 
degree. 

Requirements for Admission to the Business 
Administration Major 

Students must be eligible for admission to the Business 
Administration major to enroll in upper-level Business core and 
concentration/track courses. To be eligible, students must com- 
plete the seven specific lower-level core courses with a grade 
equivalent of 2.00 or higher and a minimum GPA of 2.70 for 
ALL seven lower-level core courses. (See admission require- 
ments in the Business Administration major section of this cat- 
alog.) 

Lower-Level Core Courses (21 units) 
ACCT 201 Accounting Principles I (or ACCT 211) (3) 
ACCT 202 Accounting Principles 11 (or ACCT 212) (3) 
LEGL 225 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

cose 1 1 1 Information and Technology for Business 

(or cose 112) (3) 
ECON 201 Microeconomic Principles (or ECON 203) (3) 
ECON 202 Macroeconomic Principles (or ECON 204) (3) 
ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics I (3) 

or 
MATH 231 Basic Statistics (or MATH 233) (3) 

Upper-Level Business Core Courses (33 units) 

BUSX30I Business Cornerstone (3)" 

Note: GenEd I.D. Advanced Writing course is taken prior to or concurrent 

withBVSX iOl. 

BUSX 460 Professional Experience (3) 

EBUS 311 Principles of e-Business (3) 

FIN 331 Principles of Financial Management (3) 

ECON 306 Statistics for Business and Economcs II (3) 

MKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (or MKTG 342) (3) 

MNGT 337 Information Technology (3) 

MNGT361 Principles of Management (3) 

MNGT 365 Principles of Operations Management (3) 

MNGT 375 International Business: Theory and Practice (3) 

MNGT 481 Business Strategy and Policy (3) 



The College of Business and Economics 



Marketing Concentration (21 units) 

EBUS 41 1 e-Business Marketing (3) 

MKTG425 Buyer Behavior Analysis (3) 

MKTG 441 Marketing Research and Forecasting (3) 

MKTG 445 International Marketing (3) 

MKTG 485 Strategic Marketing (3) 

Two MKTG electives selected from: 



(3) 



(3) 



Advertising Management 

Services Marketing (3) 

Product Development and Planning 

Sales Management (3) 

Retail Management (3) 

Marketing Channels (3) 

Marketing for Nonprofit Organizations (3) 

Principles of Transportation (3) 

Marketing Seminar (3) 

Special Topics in Marketing (3) 

Marketing Internship (1-3) 
NOTE: Only 3 units of the MKTG 497 course can be applied to the 
Marketing Concentration requirement. 



MKTG 345 
MKTG 347 
MKTG 349 
MKTG 351 
MKTG 355 
MKTG 357 
MKTG 361 
MKTG 371 
MKTG 442 
MKTG 470-479 
MKTG 497 



MASS COMMUNICATION INTERDISCIPLINARY 
SPECIALIZATION 

The Mass Communication Interdisciplinary Specialization requires 
completion of the Business Administration (Marketing) major and 
15 units as listed below. Students must earn a grade equivalent of 
2.00 or higher in each required course below. Students completing 
this specialization will receive a departmental certificate. Students 
need to apply for the certificate in the office of the Department of 
Mass Communication and Communication Studies with documen- 
tation of eligibility at least 90 days before graduation. 

Mass Communication Advertising Specialization 

MCOM 101 Introduction to Mass Communication (3) 
MCOM 214 Principles of Advertising (3) 
MCOM 325 Advertising Copyviiriting (3) 
MCOM 440 Advertising Media Sales (3) 
MCOM 447 Advertising Campaigns (3) 

Mass Communication Public Relations Specialization 

MCOM 101 Introduction to Mass Communication (3) 
MCOM 253 Principles of Public Relations (3) 
MCOM 357 Public Relations Writing (3) 
COMM 422 Conference and Meeting Management (3) 

or 
MCOM 451 Public Relations for Nonprofit Organizations (3) 
MCOM 453 Public Relations Campaigns (3) 

WHY STUDY ELECTRONIC BUSINESS? 

The e-Business Program is designed for individuals who aspire 
to work in technologically oriented companies and/or assist 
small businesses and developing companies to keep up with 
changes in the business world. Students will be able to develop, 
host and maintain online businesses in terms of applications of 
both Web-based and business strategies. 

MAJOR IN ELECTRONIC BUSINESS 

All major requirements must be completed with a grade equiv- 
alent of 2.00 or higher. The program consists of 21 units in 
lower-level core courses, 27 units of upper-level Business core 
courses, and 24 units of e-Business courses. 

Screening 

There is a two-tiered screening process required for admission 
to the e-Business major. Prior to admission, students must com- 
plete the seven (7) lower-level core courses with a minimum 
2.70 cumulative GPA. They must also earn a .3.00 or better ui 
the following courses: COSClll Information and Technology 
for Business, MNGT337 Information Technology, and 
EBUS31 1 Principles of e-Business. 



Admission Requirements 

Candidates for the e-Business major must satisfy the following 
requirements: 

1. Formally admitted to TU as a degree candidate. 

2. Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 or higher for all course 
work. 

3. Completion of most of the lower-level General Education 
requirements (GenEds). 

4. Grade equivalent of 2.00 (grade of C) or higher in each lower- 
level core course. 

5. Minimum GPA average of 2.70 for ALL seven lower-level core 
courses. 

6. Completion of Information and Technology for Business 
(COSC 1 1 1/1 12), Information Technology MNGT 337), and 
Principles of e-Business (EBUS 311) with a minimum GPA of 
3.00 (grade of B) or higher for each of the three courses. 

The minimum GPA will be reviewed each term and may be 
adjusted as space availability dictates. Candidates for the major 
must fulfill the requirements in effect at the time of application. 



(3) 
(3) 



Lower-Level Core Courses (21 units) 

ACCT 201 Principles of Accounting I (or ACCT 211) 

ACCT 202 Principles of Accounting II (or ACCT 212) 

COSC 1 1 1 Information and Technology for Business 

(or COSC 112) (3) 
ECON 201 Microeconomics (or ECON 203) (3) 
ECON 202 Macroeconomics (or ECON 204) (3) 
LEGE 225 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics I (3) 



MATH 23 1 Basic Statistics (or MATH 233) (3) 

Degree candidates intending to major in Electronic Business are 
designated as "pre-e-Business" (PEBU) until admitted into the 
EBUS major. Students are encouraged to meet each term with 
their assigned faculty adviser to evaluate their progress in com- 
pleting the requirements for admission to major and the degree. 

Application Procedure 

Students who will meet the admission requirements at the end 
of the term must complete an Application for Admission to the 
EBUS Major and a Change of Major Declaration Form before 
registering for upper-level "majors only" CBE courses (BUSX, 
EBUS, ECON, FIN, MKTG, and MNGT). The forms are avail- 
able in the Department of Marketing and e-Business, Stephens 
Hall, room 121 or CBE Student Academic Services, Stephens 
Hall 104. 

Upper-Level Business Core Courses (27 units) 

BUSX 301 Business Cornerstone (3)' 

Note: GenEd I.D. Advanced Writing course ts taken prior to or concurrent 

with BUSX 301. 

BUSX 460 Professional Experience (3) 

EBUS 311 Principles of e-Business (3) 

FIN 331 Principles of Financial Management (3) 

MKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (3) (or MKTG .342) 

MNGT 337 Information Technology (3) 

MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 

MNGT 365 Principles of Operations Management (3) 

MNGT 481 Business Strategy and Policy (3) 

e-Business Courses (24 units) 

EBUS 367 Internet Technology (3) (offered only in fall) 

EBUS 41 1 e-Business Marketing (3) (offered in fall and spring) 

EBUS 421 Financial Aspects of c-Business (3) (offered only in fall) 

EBUS 431 Advanced e-Business (3) (offered only in spring) 

EBUS 469 Current Developments in e-Busincss (3) 



Department of Marketing and e-Business 



Three courses selected from: 

ART 317 Graphic Design (3) 

CIS 475 Analysis and Design for Websites (3) 

cose 311 Digital Technologies in Society (3) 

cose 484 Weh-based Programming (3) 

EBUS 328 Cyber Law: The Law of the Internet (3) 

EBUS 470 Special Topics in e-Business (3) 

MKTG 345 Advertising Management (3) 

MKTG 441 Marketing Research and Forecasting (3) 

MKTG 445 International Marketing (3) 

MKTG 485 Strategic Marketing (3) 

MNGT 419 Supply Chain Management (3) 

MNGT 443 Project Management (3) 

MNGT 482 Business Ethics and Society (3) 

DOUBLE MAJOR IN ELECTRONIC BUSINESS AND 
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

The Electronic Business major with a second major in Computer 
Information Systems requires a minimum of 133 units to be earned 
with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. The program consists of 
21 units of lower-level core courses, 6 or 7 units of required math- 
ematics, 24 units of upper-level BUAD core courses, 12 units of 
e-Business courses, and 32 units of computer information systems 
requirements as well as the General Education requirements. 

Admission to the Double Major in Electronic Business and 
Computer Information Systems 

Students are admitted to the double major in Electronic Business 
and Computer Information Systems on a competitive basis after 
first being admitted to the university. Admission to the university 
does not guarantee admission to the major. Each term, the 
Department of Marketing and e-Business considers applications 
for admission to the major in the following term. In order to be 
admitted to the major, students must satisfy specific screening 
requirements and complete an application form for admission. 
Degree candidates intending to pursue the double major in 
Electronic Business and Computer Information Systems are desig- 
nated as "pre-e-Business" (PEBU) until admitted into the major. 
Students are encouraged to meet each term with their assigned fac- 
ulty adviser to evaluate their progress in completing the require- 
ments for admission to the EBUS major and the degree. 

Admission Requirements 

Candidates for the double major in e-Business and Computer 
Information Systems must satisfy the requirements for the 
e-Business major. 

Application Procedure 

If you meet the admission requirements by the end of the term, you 
must complete an "Application for Admission to the Double Major 
in Electronic Business and Computer Information Systems" and a 
change of major declaration form before registering for upper-level 
"majors only" CBE courses (ACCT, BUSX, EBUS, ECON, FIN, 
FPLN, LEGE, MKTG, and MNGT). 

The forms are available in the Department of Marketing and 
e-Business, Stephens Hall, room 121, or the CBE Student Academic 
Services, Stephens Hall 104. 

Lower Level Core Courses (21 units) 

ACCT 201 Principles of Accounting 1 (or ACCT 211) (3) 

ACCT 202 Principles of Accounting II (or ACCT 212) (3) 
COSC 111 Information and Technology for Business (or COSC 112) 

(3) 
ECON 201 Microeconomics (or ECON 203) (3) 
ECON 202 Macroeconomics (or ECON 204) (3) 
LEGE 225 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics I (3) 

or 
MATH 231 Basic Statistics (or MATH 233) (3) 



Required Mathematics Courses (6-7 units) 
MATH 211 Calculus for Applications (3) 

or 
MATH 273 Calculus I (4) 
MATH 263 Discrete Math (3) 

Computer Information Systems Requirements (32 units) 

CIS 21 1 Fundamentals of Information Systems and Technology (3) 

COSC 236 Introduction to Computer Science 1 (4) 
COSC 237 Introduction to Computer Science 11 (4) 
CIS 239 Computer Systems Architecture (3) 

CIS 334 Data Organization (3) 

or 
CIS 335 Advanced Business Programming (3) 

COSC 350 Data Communications and Networking (3) 
CIS 379 Systems Analysis and Design (3) 

EBUS 311 Principles of e-Business (3) (as the CIS Projects-Based 

course) 
CIS 458 Organizational Database Management (3) 

CIS 479 Software Project Management (3) 

or 
MNGT 443 Project Management (3) 

Upper-Level BUAD Core Courses (24 units) 

BUSX 301 Business Cornerstone (3)* 

'Note: GenEd I.D. Advanced Writing course is taken prior to or 

concurrent with BUSX 301 

BUSX 460 Professional Experience (3) 

MNGT 337 Information Technology (3) 

FIN 331 Principles of Financial Management (3) 

MKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (3) 

MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 

MNGT 365 Principles of Operations Management (3) 

MNGT 48 1 Business Strategy and Policy (3) 

e-Business Courses (12 units) 

EBUS 367 Internet Technology (3) 

EBUS 411 e-Busmess Marketing (3) 

EBUS 421 Financial Aspects of c-Business (3) 

EBUS 43 1 Advanced e-Business (3) 

DOUBLE MAJOR IN ELECTRONIC BUSINESS AND 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MARKETING) 

The Electronic Business major with a second major in Business 
Administration (Marketing) requires a minimum of 125 units to be 
earned with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. The program 
consists of 21 units of lower-level courses, 33 units of upper-level 
BUAD core courses, 15 units of Marketing courses, 15 units of 
upper-level e-Business courses, and 6 units of elective courses from 
a specified list as well as the General Education requirements. 

Requirements for Admission to the Double Major in 
Electronic Business and Business Administration 

(Marketing) 

Students are admitted to the double ma)or in Electronic Business 
and Business Administration (Marketing) on a competitive basis 
after first being admitted to the university. Admission to the uni- 
versity does not guarantee admission to the double major. Each 
term, the College of Business and Economics (CBE) Admissions 
Committee considers applications for admission to the major in 
the following term. Degree candidates intending to pursue the 
double major in Electronic Business and Business Administration 
(Marketing) are designated as "pre-e-Business" (PEBU) or "pre- 
Business Administration" (PBUA) until admitted into the majors. 
Students are encouraged to meet each term with their assigned fac- 
ulty adviser to evaluate their progress in completing the require- 
ments for admission to the major and the degree. 



The College of Business and Economics 



Admission Requirements 

Candidates for the double major in e-Business and Business 
Administration (Marketing) must satisfy the admission require- 
ments tor the e-Business major. 

Application Procedure 

If you meet the admission requirements at the end of the term, you 
must complete an Application for Admission to the BUAD Major 
and a change of major declaration form before registering for 
upper-level "majors only" CBE courses (ACCT, BUSX, EBUS, 
ECOM, ECON, FIN, FPLN, LEGE, MKTG, and MNGT). The 
forms are available in the Department of Marketing and 
e-Business, Stephens Hall 123 or the CBE Academic Services, 
Stephens Hall 104. 

Lower-Level Core Courses (21 units) 

ACCT 201/211 Accounting Principles I (3) 

ACCT 202/212 Accounting Principles II (3) 

cose 111/112 Information &; Technology for Business (3) 

ECON 201/203 iVlicroeconomic Principles (3) 

ECON 202/204 Macroeconomic Principles (3) 

LEGL 225 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

MATH 231/233 Basic Statistics (3) 

or 
ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics I (3) 

Upper-Level Business Courses (33 units) 

BUSX 301 Business Cornerstone (3) 

Note: GenEd I.D. Advanced Writing Course is taken prior to or concur- 
rent u/ith BUSX 301 

BUSX 460 Professional Experience (3) 

EBUS 3 1 1 Principles of e-Business (3) 

ECON 306 Statistics for Business and Economics II (3) 

FIN 331 Principles of Financial Management (3) 

MKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (3) 

or 

MKTG 342 Department Honors Principles of Marketing (3) 

MNGT 337 Information Technology (31 

MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 

MNGT 365 Principles of Operations Management (3) 

MNGT 375 International Business; Theory and Practice (3) 

MNGT 481 Business Strategy and Policy (3) 



Marketing Concentration Required Courses (15 units) 

EBUS 411 e-Business Marketing (3) 

MKTG 425 Buyer Behavior Analysis (3) 

MKTG 441 Marketing Research (3) 

MKTG 445 International Marketing (3) 

MKTG 485 Strategic Marketing (3) 

e-Business Courses (15 units) 

EBUS 367 Internet Technology (3) 

EBUS 411 e-Business Marketing (3) 

EBUS 421 Financial Aspects of e-Business (3) 

EBUS 431 Advanced e-Business (3) 

EBUS 469 Current Developments in e-Business (3) 

Two Electives (6 units) 

ART 317 Graphic Design (3) 

CIS 475 Analysis and Design of Websites (3) 

cose 311 Digital Technologies in Society (3) 

cose 484 Web-based Programming (3) 

EBUS 328 Cyber Law: The Law of the Internet (3) 

EBUS 470 Special Topics in e-Business (3) 

MKTG 345 Advertising Management (3) 

MNGT 419 Supply Chain Management (3) 

MNGT 443 Project Management (3) 

MNGT 482 Business Ethics and Society (3) 

FINANCIAL PLANNING TRACK 

Majors in e-Business may pursue the following opportunity at 
CBE. This 18-unit sequence offers the additional academic course 
work needed to qualify to take the CFP* Certification Examination 
and provides entry-level access to the field of financial planning. 

ACCT 361 Tax Accounting I (3) 

FIN 333 Investments and Securities Analysis I (3) 

FPLN 341 Fundamentals of Financial Planning (3) 

FPLN 343 Insurance and Risk Management (3) 

FPLN 441 Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits (3) 

FPLN 443 Estate Planning (3) 




I 




The College of Education 



Towson University has a distinguished history in the preparation of classroom teach- 
ers and education specialists. As the first teacher-training institution in Maiyland. Towson 
University has been preparing men and women for teaching careers for over 139 years. 
Programs of study within the College of Education lead to the baccalaureate degree in edu- 
cation with ceitification in Early Childhood Education. Elementary Education and Special 
Education. In addition, the college offers progrcnns that lead to certification in Secondarv 
Education and K-12 education for those students enrolled in other colleges of the universir\; 
Programs of study within the college are constantly assessed and reorganized in order to 
provide students with three essentials for professional success: I) a challenging general 
education in a variety of disciplines: 2) in-depth content knowledge in the field of teaching 
specialization: 3) and a professional education based upon current research and models of 
best practice. 

The teaching faculty in the College of Education is dedicated to providing a back- 
ground in research on learning and methods of instruction which prepares teachers and 
education specialists as facilitators of active learning for diverse and inclusive communi- 
ties of learners in environments that are technologically advcmced. To promote this goal, 
faculty members are committed to active participation in the academic community as teach- 
ers, scholars and advisers. They use methods of instruction which emphasize active student 
learning through the integration of content knowledge with the study and practice of effec- 
tive pedagogy. 



Early Childhood Education 

Elementary Education 

Instructional Technology 

Integrated Elementary Education - Special 

Education 
K-12 Teacher Education (Art, Dance, Health 

Education, Physical Education, Music) 
Reading 

School Library/Media 
Secondary Education 
Special Education 



Raymond R Lotion, Dean 
Thomas Proffitt, Associate Dean 
Roxana DellaVecchia, Assistant Dean 



COLLEGE OFFICE 

Hawkins Hall 301, 410-704-2570 

Fax: 410-704-2733 

www. towson.edu/coe 



The College of Education 



CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 

The College of Education offers programs of study leading to the 
baccalaureate degree in education with certification to teach early 
childhood, elementary, and special education. In addition, the col- 
lege offers programs that lead to teacher certification in secondary 
education and K-12 education. 

Teacher Education programs are approved by the National 
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education and the 
Maryland State Department of Education, which use state and 
nationally recognized standards. Completion of an approved pro- 
gram qualifies graduates for certification in all states that are mem- 
bers of the Interstate Reciprocity Contract. Applicants for 
Maryland teaching certificates are required to achieve qualif>'ing 
scores on the Praxis I and 11 examinations, as determined by the 
Maryland State Board of Education. 

TITLE n — HIGHER EDUCATION ACT 
Required Program Information Report 

1. Students 

Total number of students enrolled in 2002-2003 — 2,521 

2. Teacher Candidates 

Total number of student teachers in 2002-2003 — 483 

3. Faculty Supervising Interns 

Appointed full-time faculty in professional education — 47 
Appomted part-time faculty in professional education, but full- 
time in the institution — 34 
Appointed part-time in professional education — 21 

4. Ratio of Interns to Faculty Supervisors 

Number of student teachers per faculty supervisor — 4.7 

5. Length of Internship 

7.5 hours per day; 5 days per week; 20 weeks 
760 total hours of supervised internship 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The mission of teacher education at Towson University is to 
inspire, educate and prepare educators as facilitators of active 
learning for diverse and inclusive populations in environments that 
are technologically advanced. In this process, faculty members 
assume the responsibility for designing, developing, implementing 
and assessing academic programs for: 

1. entering College of Education freshmen 

2. community college transfer students 

3. post-baccalaureate degree students seeking certification 
(MAT; approved programs) 

4. master's degree students 

5. post-master's degree students seeking continuous professional 
development 

VISION STATEMENT 

The vision of teacher education at Towson University is to build 
upon its rich heritage and excellent reputation and to position itself 
to maintain a leadership role in academic program planning and 
public policy formulation. By maintaining this leadership role, 
teacher education can ensure that active learning occurs in diverse 
and inclusive educational environments where contemporary infor- 
mation resources are available. Thus, teacher education, in collab- 
oration with other public/private agencies, can assist in the readi- 
ness of all learners to succeed in a rapidly changing, diverse and 
highly technical world. In order to achieve this vision, Teacher 
Education programs at Towson University are committed to: 

1. ensuring the mastery of appropriate content in general studies 
in the liberal arts and sciences as well as in the specific aca- 
demic discipline 

2. reflecting upon and refining best practices— pit)fessional 
knowledge and skills — to develop a repertoire of instructional 
and assessment strategies 

3. preparing students for diverse and inclusive communities of 
learners through systematic exposure to heterogeneous populations 



4. utilizing appropriate technologies which reflect best practices 
in education 

5. helping develop, internalize and display professional con- 
science (a commitment to ethical practice, inquiry, knowledge, 
competence, caring and social justice in a democratic society) 

6. developing collaborative partnerships with the public/private 
sector 

7. playing a leadership role in teacher education through schol- 
arly endeavors 

PROGRAM OUTCOMES 

All Teacher Education programs utilize Maryland's Essential 
Dimensions of Teaching or the Interstate New Teacher Assessment 
and Support Consortium Principles as performance-based out- 
comes for teacher candidates. 

ADMISSION TO TEACHER EDUCATION 

The College of Education admits students either as freshmen or as 
undergraduate transfer students from accredited, post-secondary 
institutions. During the freshman and sophomore years, students 
are generally engaged in pre-professional courses or courses that 
fulfill General Education requirements. 

Advising and Screening 

Students who plan to enter Teacher Education programs must visit 
the Center for Professional Practice, Hawkins Hall, room 302, 
early in their first term in order to: 

1. declare their major or concentration 

2. complete a Criminal Background Disclosure Form 

3. be assigned an adviser according to their chosen major 

4. obtain information about the required speech and hearing 
screening 

5. obtain information about the required Praxis I tests 

Admission to Professional Education Programs 

Admission to the professional program requires the following: 

1. completion of a written application for formal admission to 
the program 

2. minimum overall GPA of 2.50 in Secondary Education; mini- 
mum overall GPA of 2.75 in Early Childhood, Elementary 
Education and Special Education; (Students in Art Education, 
Dance Education, Health Education, Music Education and 
Physical Education should contact their department chairper- 
son for procedures and requirements for admission to these 
programs.) 

3. completion of speech and hearing screening 

4. completion of English 102/190 or equivalent course with 
grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher; Secondary Education 
also requires an admission essay 

5. successful completion of Praxis I Academic Skills Assessments; 
qualifying scores must be submitted to the Center for 
Professional Practice for admission to College of Education 
programs. Information on the Praxis tests is available in the 
Center for Professional Practice, Hawkins Hall, room 302. 

6. All students applying for admission to a Teacher Education 
program at Towson University are required to complete a 
Criminal Background Disclosure Form. This form may be 
obtained from the department for K-12 programs or from the 
Center for Professional Practice for College of Education pro- 
grams. The form is to be notarized and sent to Karen Schafer, 
the director of the Center for Professional Practice, to be kept 
on file. Janet Martin of the Center for Professional Practice is 
a notary with posted office hours. 

In addition to the undergraduate program, the College of 
Education offers approved, post-baccalaureate "certification only" 
programs for baccal.uireate graduates seeking Maryland state 
certification. "Certification onlv" students must document a 



The College of Education 



passing score (as determined by the Mar)'land State Department of 
Education) on Praxis I and attain the required GPA prior to admis- 
sion. 

The Teacher Education Executive Board (TEEB) reserves the 
right to refuse, deny or revoke the appHcation for admission to 
professional education programs or entry into the teaching intern- 
ship (student teaching) of any student whose observed conduct is 
deemed incongruent with established guidelines of student 
demeanor for those planning to enter the teaching profession. 

Admission to the Professional Year of Teaching 

Students apply for student teaching over the Internet 
(http://bacost.towson.edul through the Center for Professional 
Practice by the mid-term date of the term prior to the beginning of 
the Professional Year. All Teacher Education students must suc- 
cessfully complete the Praxis I tests and a speech and hearing 
screening. All preservice students in Teacher Education programs 
at Towson University whose programs of study require an inten- 
sive/extensive internship or student teaching experience in a public 
or private school setting (pre-K through 12) are required to com- 
plete a criminal background check before beginning this experi- 
ence. The criminal background check must be filed with Karen 
Schafer, the director of the Center for Professional Practice. Forms 
are available in the Center for Professional Practice only. 

Because some of Towson's Teacher Education programs have 
selected additional requirements for admission to the teaching 
internship (student teaching), students should refer to the section 
of this catalog related to their specific majors. 

FIELD EXPERIENCE PLACEMENTS 

Each Teacher Education student who has reached the appropriate 
level of competency will have a series of progressively responsible 
field experiences. Towson University is implementing a network of 
Professional Development Schools to provide all students with an 
intensive and extensive internship, including on-site course work 
integrated with pre-student teaching and student teaching experi- 
ences. 

Differentiated student teaching (an additional and/or special 
teaching experience) may be taken by students with the permission 
of their adviser. 

Students enrolled in the teaching internship (student teaching) 
are charged a lab fee. This fee is used for remuneration to mentor 
teachers in schools where field experiences are completed. 

CENTER FOR PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE 



6. tracking Education majors and maintaining Education student 
records 

7. evaluating requests for credit for prior teaching experience 

8. coordinating the Student Teaching Abroad Program 

9. collecting data that analyzes program strengths and needs 

MARYLAND WRITING PROJECT 

OFFICE 

Hawkins Hall 403C, 410-704-3593 
Director: Barbara Bass, 410-704-4573 
Co-director: Linda De La Ysla, 410-704-4094 

The Maryland Writing Project (MWP), a site of the National 
Writing Project, is housed in Towson University's College of 
Education. It is supported by the colleges of Education and Liberal 
Arts. Established in Baltimore in 1981, the MWP is a teacher-driv- 
en professional development organization for teachers across the 
content areas in grades pre-K through university. Its mission is to 
identif\^ train and support excellent teachers so that they can share 
with others their knowledge and experience in teaching writing 
and in using writing as a learning tool. Teachers participate in an 
invitational Summer Institute to become Teacher-Consultants. 
They research, develop and share best writing practices to effect 
change in their classrooms, schools and school systems. 

The MWP offers both undergraduate and graduate courses. 
Maryland Writing Project Teacher-Consultants serve as instructors 
for EDUC 301 Writing and Communication Skills for Teachers. 
They also teach SCED 399 Differentiated Student Teaching, which 
is offered during the summer in conjunction with a camp for young 
writers called the Student Writers' Workshop. At the graduate 
level, MWP-trained Teacher-Consultants teach SCED 605, the 
6-unit Summer Teacher Institute; EDUC 734, the Teacher Inquiry 
Institute; EDUC 667 Writing as Thinking; and EDUC 661 
Responding to and Evaluating Writing. They also teach special top- 
ics courses at the graduate level throughout the year. 

Finally, the MWP offers Maryland State Department of 
Education-approved, in-service professional development work- 
shops in school systems across the state. The courses range in 
scope from daylong to yearlong classes. 



OFFICE 

Hawkins Hall 302, 410-704-2567 

Director: Karen Schafer 

Assistant Director: Carolan Stewart 

The Center for Professional Practice is a service office working 
jointly with the College of Education at Towson University^ The 
major purpose of the center is to assist students and instructors in 
placing students in a variety of field settings for internship experi- 
ences and developing and supporting Professional Development 
Schools. More specific operations include: 

1. facilitating field experiences — preservice and student teach- 
ing/internship, and Professional Development Schools 

2. counseling students regarding field work 

3. maintaining liaison between schools/agencies and universi- 
ty departments 

4. coordinating student advising (orientation, declaration of 
major, assignment of advisers, etc.) 

5. providing information to Education majors on Praxis and 
speech and hearing test administrations 



The College of Education 



Department of 

Early Childhood Education 

Professors: Terry Berkeley ( Chair), Barry Frieman 

Associate Professors: Mubina Kirmani, Ocie Watson-Thompson, 

Edyth Wheeler (Graduate Director), Nancy Wiltz 
Assistant Professor: Joan Ports 
Lecturers: Hannah Cawley, Heather Skelley, Patsy Washington 

OFFICE 

Hawkins Hail 014, 410-704-2572 

Fax: 410-704-2990 

e-mail: lcaldwell@towson.edu 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The mission of the Teacher Education Unit is to inspire, educate 
and prepare facilitators of active learning for diverse and inclu- 
sive communities of learners in environments that are technolog- 
ically advanced. 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Early Childhood Education offers the follow- 
mg programs of study: the major in Early Childhood Education, 
the major in Elementary Education with eligibility for Early 
Childhood Education certification, a Post-Baccalaureate 
Certification-Only Option, the Master of Arts in Teaching in Early 
Childhood Education, and the Master of Education in Early 
Childhood Education. For more information about the graduate 
program, consult the Graduate Catalog. 

The Towson University Department of Early Childhood 
Education faculty prepares teachers to act as advocates for young 
children and their families, and to create and facilitate develop- 
mentally appropriate environments for them. The guiding princi- 
ples that follow are the philosophical and practical basis for 
departmental programs. 

Students entering the Early Childhood Education program are 
made aware of the sophisticated and demanding work that teach- 
ers of young children perform, and they are screened accordingly 
for admission into the program. Developing teachers are enabled 
to recognize teaching as one of the highest and most dynamic pro- 
fessional callings to which one can aspire. Faculty members facili- 
tate the developing teacher's respect for, pride in, and commitment 
to the teaching profession. Faculty members motivate and inspire 
developing teachers in the most positive of ways, to have a sense of 
their abilit)' to e.xert positive power m learning scenarios as well as 
exerting a firm sense of professional self-direction and decision- 
making skills. Faculty members assist developing teachers to 
become reflective and ever-growing practitioners. From the outset, 
developing teachers are taught and provided models that only the 
very best is good enough for young children and their families. 

Faculty members work to awaken and support the developing 
teacher's ability to value and approach children from broad intel- 
lectual, academic and social foundations. Developing teachers are 
prepared to rely upon those foundations in order to support the 
development of relevant and challenging curricula and to learn to 
respond to young children's immediate and long-term needs. 

Content-appropriate and developmentally appropriate peda- 
gogy facilitates integrated learning experiences and environments 
for young children. The faculty understands how young children 
develop and learn, thus, they facilitate in developing teachers con- 
tent-appropriate pedagogy. The faculty also provides a wealth of 
experiences, strategies, creativity and resources to enable develop- 
ing teachers to draw in and inspire young children in content areas. 



The Early Childhood Education faculty members help developing 
teachers understand how their personal and professional philoso- 
phies prompt them to facilitate the development of the "whole 
child." Integrated knowledge about child development is crucial to 
understanding children's play, learning and socialization. Faculty 
members make it apparent to developing teachers that assessing 
and responding to children's individual differences and dev'elop- 
menta! needs requires resourcefulness, responsibility and respon- 
siveness. Developing teachers are encouraged to respond to the 
individual child while recognizing that their responses occur incre- 
mentally within the context of meeting the needs of a total group 
or class. 

Faculty members in Early Childhood Education are committed 
to enabling developing teachers to meet the diverse learning needs 
of all young children, particularly in terms of their creative and aes- 
thetic development, their learning modalities or styles (visual, audi- 
tory, kinesthetic and tactile), and their myriad intelligences (spatial, 
musical, mathematical, linguistic, kinesthetic and personal). 
Moreover, the faculty encourages students to become teachers who 
value the significance of human diversity and the richness, beauty 
and power that human diversity offers to classrooms and other 
places where learning takes place. Faculty and developing teachers, 
therefore, are committed to designing diversity-rich environments 
that encourage respect for the individuality of teachers and young 
children. Additionally, faculty members promote respect for fami- 
lies and the importance of family in the lives of children. All of this 
serves as the ethical foundation of practice, providing a basis for 
developing teachers to move toward high ideals in their work with 
young children and their families. 

Major in Elementary Education/Early Childhood Certification 

In cooperation with Elementary Education, students can select 
courses that will enable them to become certified in Early 
Childhood Education and Elementary Education. Graduates of this 
program are eligible to teach children from birth through age 13. 
Interested students should contact the chairs of both departments 
to plan their program. 

Post-baccalaureate Certification-Only Option 

For bachelor's degree holders in disciplines related to children and 
families as well as other fields of study, the Department of Early 
Childhood Education offers a post-baccalaureate program leading 
to Maryland certification in Early Childhood Education (birth-8). 
Prospective students interested in this option need to contact the 
department chairperson to set up an appointment to have their 
transcript(s) analyzed and a program of study developed based 
upon state certification and departmental requinanmts. The 
department will send to prospective students an application and 
packet of information and forms regarding post-baccalaureate 
study. Entry into and completion of this program includes a mini- 
mum GPA of 2.60 in previous academic work and passing the 
Praxis I and Praxis II examinations and attaining Maryland 
required scores. (Note: This is a non-degree program.] 

Alternate Early Childhood Education Program 

As a service to teachers who wish to pursue a degree in Early 
Childhood Education while they are on their teaching assignments 
and to other workers in programs for young children, the universi- 
ty offers an alternate program during evenings and summers for the 
preparation of nursery school, kindergarten, day care center and 
primary teachers which will enable them to major in Early 
Childhood Education. There is a requirement to student teach and 
to participate in the student teaching seminar during daytime 
hours. See the department chairperson for information. 



The Department of Early Childhood Education 



Special Education Certification 

Courses leading to Maryland State Department of Education certi- 
fication in Special Education are available through the Department 
of Reading, Special Education and Instructional Technology. State 
certification is generic hut age specific and requires 39 units, many 
of which are required for Early Childhood Education majors. 

School Library Media 

Coordinator: Cellestine Cheeks 
Hawkms Hall 204A, 410-704-2135 

Early Childhood Education students may acquire an additional 
state certification endorsement for school librarian or media center 
positions (Educational Media Associate, Level I). Interested stu- 
dents should contact the Department of Reading, Special Education 
and Instructional Technology, or the coordinator. 

MAJOR IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

To meet university, college and Maryland State Department of 
Education certification requirements in general education and pro- 
fessional education courses, students must complete a 128-unit 
program for graduation. Students must have a grade equivalent 
average of 3.00 or higher in all courses in the major; this includes 
interdisciplinary courses taken during the final four terms of the 
program. Students must maintain an overall GPA of 2.75 or high- 
er in all courses from all institutions of higher education in which 
the student has been enrolled. 

All students, beginning with their enrollment in ECED 103, 
Introduction to Early Childhood Education, will be responsible for 
compiling and refining a Professional Portfolio. Student portfolios 
will be assessed and evaluated throughout the program. 

Early Childhood Education majors need to confer with an advis- 
er from the department each term to ensure that their planned pro- 
gram of study meets college, university and state requirements. This 
is particularly important if students are pursuing minors or if they 
are planning for additional certifications. Students also need to 
check with their departmental adviser prior to taking a course on a 
Pass grading option as courses in the major and courses required 
for certification cannot be taken using the Pass/Fail grading option. 

Early Childhood Education Screening Criteria 

Early Childhood Education is a screened major. Students apply for 
the major during their fifth term to begin in their sixth term. 
Students must complete 65 units of courses in the program, have a 
cumulative 2.75 GPA and 3.00 GPA in professional courses from 
the time they enter the program until the time of graduation. The 
number of students admitted into the program each term is deter- 
mined by the number of seats available. Typically there are 40 seats 
open per term for students meeting all requirements to enter the 
major. 

The following requirements must be met for entry into the 
major: 

1. completion of 65 or more units including ECED 103, ECED 
201, ENGL102/190, MATH 204, MATH 205, MATH 251, and 
SPED 301 with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. 

2. achievement of a cumulative GPA of 2.75; this includes all 
grades earned in transfer courses and grades earned at Towson 
University. (A failed course that has been repeated satisfactorily 
at another institution will be eliminated only from the computa- 
tion for admission into the Early Childhood Education program. 
Courses taken at Towson University and repeated at another col- 
lege or university do not apply to Towson 's repeated course pol- 
icy. See "Transferring Work to Towson" under the Academic 
Regulations section of this catalog.) 

3. completion of the Speech and Hearing screening. This screening 
is offered free at the beginning of each term for two days only. 
Call the Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic in Van Bokkelen Hall 
or the Department of Early Childhood Education for dates. 



4. a score at or above the level established in March 1999 by the 
Maryland State Board of Education on the Praxis I - Academic 
Skills Assessments Examination: Pre-Professional Skills Tests 
{written and computer versions) (PPST) - Math: 177; Reading: 
177, Writing: 173. A composite score is now being accepted by 
the Maryland State Department of Education for any student 
who did not pass the Praxis 1. For more information on the pass- 
ing composite scores contact the Department of Early 
Childhood Education. 

5. application, including official transcripts from all post-high- 
school institutions, submitted to the Center for Professional 
Practice by the announced closing date sent to eligible students 
each term. (Note: Students are required to submit a "Blue Card" 
to the department office, Hawkins Hall 014, and to update the 
information on the card each term. The Blue Card is completed 
with the assistance of the student's adviser.) 

6. meet with the student's Early Childhood Education adviser 
during the current term and provide an updated Checklist of 
Degree Requirements including the courses being taken in the 
current term. 

ECED Student Teaching Internship Criteria 

Admission into the Student Teaching Internship requires a 
cumulative GPA of 2.75 or higher and a 3.00 or higher in the 
major. 

All students in Teacher Education programs at Towson 
University are required to undergo a Criminal Background Check 
before entering the Student Teaching Internship. The Criminal 
Background Check shall be filed with the director of the Center for 
Professional Practice, where it is kept on file. 

All students need to complete two of the Praxis Il-Subject 
Assessments/Specialty Area Tests. The tests are Early Childhood 
Education #10020 and Education of the Young Child #10021. 
Both tests are required for Early Childhood Education students 
under "No Child Left Behind" to become certified and highly qual- 
ified in the state of Maryland. Test #10021 Education of the Young 
Child has not yet been approved by the Maryland State Board of 
Education. Until the test is approved, the Maryland State Board of 
Education will accept the test #10014 Elementary Education: 
Content Knowledge. Praxis II tests must be taken no later than 
during the student teaching internship if students expect to attain 
certification upon graduation. The tests are offered in written form 
only and must be taken on two different test dates. Check with the 
Department of Early Childhood Education for updated informa- 
tion and passing scores for each test. 

REQUIRED UNIVERSITY AND DEPARTMENTAL 
COURSES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND 
SUGGESTED SCHEDULE FOR MAJORS 

(128 units) 

Term 1 (16 units) 

PSYC 10 1 Introduction to Psychology (3) (II.C.2) 

GenEd (I.E) Elective (3) Creativity and Creative Development 

fMATH 204 .Mathematical Concepts and Structures I (4) 

ENGL 102/190 Writing for a Liberal Education/Honors Writing Seminar 

(3)(1.A) 
ISTC 201 Using Information Effectively in Education (3) (I.B) 

f Students who have earned a score of i or higher on the High School 
Advanced Placement Calculus Exam (AB or BC) are exempt from MATH 204. 

Term 2 (16 units) 

PSYC 201 Educanonal Psychology (3) 

MUSC 101 Introduction to Music of the Western Heritage (3) 

(Il.C.l) 
BIOL 1 10 Contemporary General Biology (4) (II. A. 1) 

ECED 103 Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3) 



The College of Education 



ENGL 233 Survey of African-American Literature (3) (ILC.3) 

or 
ENGL 234 Major Writers in African-American Literature (3) 

(n.C.3) 

or 
ENGL 235 Ethnic-American Literature (3) (ILC.3) 

Term 3(17 units) 

HIST 145 Historv of tfie United States to the Mid- 1 9th Centurv (3) 

(ILB.l) 

or 

History of the United States since the Mid-iyth Century 

(3) (ILB.l) 

Mathematical Concepts and Structures II (4) (l.C) 

Intervention and the Young Child (3) 

English elective (3) 

Physical Science I (4) (II.A.l) 
ff Students who have earned a score of i or higher on the High School 
Advanced Placement Statistics Exam are exempt from MATH 205. 



HIST 146 

ttMATH 205 
ECED201 
ENGL XXX 
PHSC 101 



Term 4(17 units) 

HLTH 101 Wellness for a Diverse Society (3) (II.B.3) 

MATH 251 Elements of Geometry (4) 

KNES 281 Physical Education for Elementary Education 

Students 1(1) 
SPED 301 Introduction to Special Education: K-12 (3) 

GenEd (II.B.2) Elective (3) American Experience: Social and Behavioral 

Sciences (PSYC 203 or PSYC 204 cannot be taken fur 

this requirement) 
GenEd (II. D) Elective (3) Global Awareness: Non-Western Cultures, 

Traditions and Issues (GEOG 102 or GEOG 105 only) 

Term 5 (16 units) 

ECED 315 Infant Intervention (3) 

ECED 321 Foundations of Reading and Language Arts (3) 

ECED 407 Interactive Technology and the Young Child (3) 

ECED 422 Writing Techniques for Teachers in Early Childhood 

Education (3) (I.D) 

Science Elective (4)* 
'Astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer science, geology, math, physical 
science or physics elective 

Term 6 (15 units) 

ECED 341 Preprimary Curriculum (4) 

ECED 360 Earlv Literacy: Best Practices and Materials (3) 

ARED 373 Art for Early Childhood Education (2) 

KNES 324 Teaching Physical Education in Elementary School (2) 

MUED 304 Methods of Teaching Music in Early Childhood 

Education (2) 
SCIE 371 Teaching Science in Early Education (2) 



Term 7 (16 units) 

ECED 342 Primary Curriculum (4) 

ECED 361 Teaching Reading in the Primary Grades 1-3: Best 

Practices and Materials (3) 
ECED 417 Assessment in Early Childhood Education (3) 
ECED 429 Principles and Practices of Reading and Language Arts 

Assessment (3) 
MATH 321 Teaching Mathematics in Early Childhood Education (3) 

Term 8(15 units) 

ECED 351 Student Teaching Internship: Primary (6) 

ECED 352 Student Teaching Internship: Preprimary (6) 

ECED 421 Problems in Early Childhood Education (3) 



ECED FIELD PLACEMENTS 

Each Teacher Education student who has reached the appropriate 
level of competence will have a series of progressively responsible 
field experiences. Towson University is implementing a network of 
Professional Development Schools to provide all students with 
intensive and extensive internships, including on-site course work 
and integrated pre-student teaching and student teaching internship 
experiences. 

As part of the thiee-term professional program in Early 
Childhood Education, students enrolled in either Primary or the 
Student Teaching Internship for the fall term will begin their work 
in August on the same date that teachers start the new school year. 
This date varies by school system, and candidates must plan appro- 
priately to fulfill their program requirements. 

STUDENT TEACHING TERM 

A maximum of 18 units may be taken during the student teaching 
internship term. 

TRANSFER STUDENT POLICIES 

A minimum of 30 units in the major must be completed at TU. 
SPED 301 Introduction to Special Education, is transferable from 
certain institutions only. Students should contact their adviser for 
more information. Students are required to take the final 30 units 
in residence at Towson University. An application process is 
required to apply to this major, in addition to acceptance to 
Towson University (September for spring registration; February for 
fall registration). 

OUTCOMES 

Students are required to compile and present a Professional 
Portfolio in order to graduate. The Early Childhood Teacher 
Education Program utilizes the Interstate Neiv Teachers 
Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) standards, 
Maryland's Essential Dimensions of Teaching (EDoTs), and the 
Standards of the National Association on the Education of Young 
Children as the performance-based outcomes for all teacher can- 
didates and the foundation framework for the Portfolio. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING — EARLY 
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

Director: Edyth Wheeler 
E-mail: ejwheeler@towson.edu 
Hawkins Hall 107-O, 410-704-2460 

A Master of Arts in Teaching program is designed to prepare espe- 
cially qualified students for teaching certifications in Pre-kinder- 
garten through grade J. For more information, see the Graduate 
Catalog. 



Department of Elementary Education 



Department of 
Elementary Education 

Professors: Bess Altwerger, Karen Robertson 
Associate Professors: Gregory Bryant {Chair), Lynn Cole, 
Roxanna Dellavecchia [Assistant Dean), Linda Emerick 
(Graduate Director), Lijun Jin, Nechie King, Prisca Martens 
(Assistant Chair), Jane Neapolitan, 
Assistant Professors: Robert Blake, Shelly Huggins, Nancy 
Jordan, Morna McDermort, Kate Power, Nancy Shelton 
Visiting Assistant Professor: Pamela Morgan 
Lecturers: Paula Bauer, Donna Copenhaver, James Cowan, 
Donna Culan, Barbara Ann Ellis, Debora Lang, Barbara 
Maestas, Richard Metzgar, Sue Rathbone, Carol Slizys 

OFFICE 

Hawkins Hall lOOA, 410-704-2176 
Undergraduate Information: 410-704-2565 
Graduate Information: 410-704-4251 
E-mail: sgrey@towson.edu 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Elementary Education offers the following pro- 
grams of study: the major in Elementary Education, the major in 
Elementary Education with eligibility for Early Childhood certifi- 
cation, the Integrated Elementary Education — Special Education 
major, the Elementary Education major with a minor in selected 
disciplines, the Master of Arts in Teaching, and the Master of 
Education in Elementary Education. For more information about 
the master's programs, consult the Graduate Catalog. 

The Elementary Education faculty believes that well-prepared 
elementary school teachers are facilitators of active learning. As 
reflective practitioners, teachers engage students in the learning 
process by utilizing research findings and experience-based strate- 
gies and practices to make sound, educational decisions. These 
decisions should be based upon an articulated education philoso- 
phy, a thorough knowledge of students' strengths and needs, and 
an analysis of various learning environments. The Elementary 
Education program fulfills the goal of preparing such teachers 
through a program based on a broad liberal arts background and 
professional preparation, including a planned sequence of courses 
and field experiences in the Baltimore metropolitan area. 

The major in Elementary Education leads to certification to 
teach grades 1 through 6 and middle school (7-8). The program 
provides classroom and laboratory experiences that prepare stu- 
dents for beginning teaching in elementary or middle schools. 
Candidates who desire a middle school placement must pass the 
Praxis II subject matter test in the content discipline. 

The Department of Elementary Education has adopted the 
Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium 
(INTASC) principles as its performance-based outcomes for its pro- 
grams. Candidates are required to demonstrate mastery of out- 
comes in a summative portfolio. 

Major in Elementary /Early Childhood Education Certification 

In addition to the major in Elementary Education, students can 
select courses that will enable them to become certified in both 
Elementan,- and Early Childhood Education. Graduates of this pro- 
gram are eligible to teach children from birth through grade 8. 
Interested students should contact the chairs of both departments 
to plan their programs. 

Integrated Elementary Education-Special Education Major 

Elementary Education majors may elect to become certified in both 
Elementary and Special Education by selecting the integrated 



approach. This program, specially designed to integrate both 
majors, prepares students as elementary classroom teachers and 
as special education teachers. 

Elementary Education Major with a Minor 

Elementary Education majors may complete programs with 
minors m other selected disciplines by arrangement with the chair 
of Elementary Education and the chair of the other department. 

Elementary Education Major/Mathematics Minor 

Through a cooperative program between the departments of 
Elementary Education and Mathematics, students can use a mid- 
dle school student teaching experience as a route to elementary 
certification with a mathematics minor. Interested students should 
consult with the chairs of both departments as early in their col- 
lege program as possible. 

DECLARING THE ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION MAJOR 

Students interested in becoming Elementary Education majors 
must first gain admission to Towson Universit)'. Admission to the 
university does not guarantee admission to the Elementary 
Education program. During the first rwo weeks of the term, all 
students should report to the Center for Professional Practice, 
Hawkins Hall, room 302, to be assigned to an adviser and to com- 
plete the following forms: 

• Declaration of Major/Minor 

• Criminal Background Disclosure 

All students enrolled in a Teacher Education program are required 
to undergo a criminal background check before participating in 
any internship placement. 

APPLYING FOR THE PROFESSIONAL 
INTERNSHIPS 

The Elementary Education program is divided into a Pre- 
Professional Program (65 units) and courses in a sequence of 
Professional Internships (61-62 units) for a total of 126-127 units. 
Acceptance into the Professional Internships is a competitive 
process and enrollment is limited by course availability and facul- 
ty resources. To submit an Application for the Professional 
Internships to the Department of Elementary Education, 
Elementary Education majors must meet the criteria listed below. 

Native Towson University students: 

• Complete a minimum of 58 units of the Pre-Professional 
Program with a minimum 2.75 GPA at Towson LIniversity. 

• Pass the Praxis I test. 

• Take a Speech and Hearing Screening (any time prior to applying). 

• Attend a mandatory orientation meeting (dates, times, loca- 
tions posted outside of Hawkins Hall 100). 

Transfer students with a Maryland-approved Associate of Arts in 
Teaching (AAT) degree: 

• Complete a minimum of 58 units of the Pre-Professional 
Program with a minimum 2.75 GPA at Towson University. 

• Pass the Praxis I test. 

• Take a Speech and Hearing Screening (within the first two 
weeks of Level I Internship). 

• Attend a mandatory orientation meeting on the Towson 
University campus (dates, times and location on campus are 
listed in the Application for the Professional Internships avail- 
able through the community college teacher education coordi- 
nator). 

AAT degree candidates must submit an Application for the 
Professional Internships in the term prior to their anticipated 
enrollment. 



The College of Education 



Transfer students with an Associate of Arts degree: 

• Complete a minimum of 58 units of the Pre-Professional 
Program with equivalent courses, and a minimum 2.75 trans- 
fer GPA. 

• Pass the Praxis I test. 

• Take a Speech and Hearing Screening (within the first two 
weeks of Level 1 Internship). 

A. A. degree students may submit an Application for the 
Professional Internships during their first term of enrollment. 

Elementary Education majors must have a minimum 2.75 GPA to 
apply for the Professional Internships. However, applicants may 
be ranked according to cumulative GPA if the number of appli- 
cants exceeds course availability. Therefore, the GPA necessary for 
admission may exceed the minimum 2.75. Elementary Education 
majors must maintam a minimum 3.00 GPA to remain enrolled in 
the Professional Internships and must earn a 2.00 or C grade in all 
courses in the Professional Internships. 

Students must submit their Application for the Professional 
Internships to the Department of Elementary Education, Hawkins 
Hall, room lOOA, by the deadline established by the department. 
Transfer students who are pursumg an Associate of Arts in 
Teaching degree from a Maryland community college should 
obtain the Application for the Professional Internships from their 
community college teacher education coordinator and must attend 
a mandatory orientation meeting on the Towson University cam- 
pus. Dates, times and locations of the orientation meetings are list- 
ed in the Application for the Professional Internships. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION MAJORS 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM (65 units) 
English (6 units) 

ENGL 102 Wrinng for a Liberal Education (3) (l.A) 
ENGL XXX English Literature elective (3) 

Social Studies (9 units) 

GEOG 102 World Regional Geography (3) (II.D) 

or 
GEOG 105 Geography of International Affairs (3) (II.D) 
HIST 145 History of the U.S. to the Mid-19th Century (3) (II.B.l) 

or 
HIST 146 History of the U.S. Since the Mid-19th Century (3) 

(U.B.lj 

pins 
One ANTH, ECON, POSC or SOCI course selected from GenEd 
category 11. B. 2 

Sciences (8 units) 

BIOL 1 10 Contemporary General Biology (4) (II.A.l)* 

PHSC 101 Physical Science I (4) (II.A.l) "> 

'prerequisite for BIOL 303 Life Science in Level II Professional 

Internships 

''prerequisite for PHSC 303 Earth-Space Science in Level II 

Professional Internships 

Mathematics (12 units) 

M.AHI 204 .Mathematics Concepts and Structures I (4) (I.C)t 

MATH 205 Mathematics Concepts and Structures II (4) (l.C)tt 

MATH 251 Elements of Geometry (4) (I.C) 

f Students who have earned a score of 3 or higher on the High 

School Advanced Placement Calculus Exam (AB or BC) are 

exempt front MATH 204. 

ff Students who have earned a score of 3 or higher on the High 

School Advanced Placement Statistics Exam are exempt from 

MATH 205. 



Creative and Cultural Arts (6 units) 

One ART, DANC or THEA course selected from GenEd category I.E (3) 
and 

One ARTH, DANC or ENGL literature course selected from GenEd cate- 
gory II.C.l (3) 

Education Related Courses (24 units) 

1STC201 Usmg Information Effectively in Education (3) (I.B) 

ELED201 School and American Society (3) (II.B.3) 

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) (II.C.2) 

EDUC 203 Teaching and Learnmg in a Diverse Society (3) (n.C.3) 

PSYC 201 Educational Psychology (3) 

SPED 301 Introduction to Special Education (3) 

ECED 201 Intervention and the Young Child (3) 

ELED 322 Foundations in Reading and other Language Arts (3) 

PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIPS (61-62 units) 

Level I Internship (14-15 units) 

ELED 320 Foundations of Writing and Other Language Arts (3) 

ELED 323 Principles and Practices of Instruction m Reading and 

Language Arts (3) 
ELED 363 Language and Literacy Internship (3) 

EDUC 417 Children's Literature and other Materials for Teaching 

Reading and Language Arts (3) 
plus one of the following: 
ARED 371 Art and the Child (3) 

KNES 324 Teaching Physical Education in Elementary School (2) 
MUED 305 Methods of Teaching Music m Elementary School (2) 

Level n Internship (17 units) 

ISTC 301 Utilization of Instructional Media (3) 

BIOL 303 Life Sciences (3) 

PHSC 303 Earth/Space Science (3) 

MATH 323 Teaching .Mathematics in Elementary School (3) 

MATH 324 Supervised Observation and Participation in Elementary 

School Mathematics (2) 
SCIE 376 Teaching Science in Elementary School (3) 

Professional Development School Year-Long Internship 
Levels III and IV 

Elementary Education majors (Interns) follow the school system 
calendar for the PDS in which they are assigned. In Level III or 
Level IV (as appropriate). Interns begin in August when teachers 
start the school year; and observe the school system calendar 
instead of the Towson University spring break. 

Level in Internship (15 units) 

ELED 3 1 1 Child and the Elementary School Curriculum and 

Assessment (3) 
ELED 312 Professional Development School Internship I (3) 

ELED 365 Teaching Social Studies in Elementary School (3) 

ELED 429 Principles and Practices of Assessment in Reading and 

Language Arts (3) 
SPED 401 Curriculum and Methods of Inclusion (3) 

Level IV Internship (15 units) 

ELED 468 Professional Development School Internship 11 (12) 

ELED 469 Professional Development School Internship II Seminar (3) 



Department of Reading, Special Education and Instructional Technology 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR INTEGRATED 
ELEAiENTARY EDUCATION - SPECIAL 
EDUCATION MAJORS 

Academic Content 

Courses to be taken before formal admission to the professional 
education sequence. 
ENGL 102 (3) 
English Elective (31 

(Literature course recommended) 
HIST 145 or 146 (3) 
History Elective (3) 

(Non-Western course recommended) 
SOCI 101 (3) 
MATH 204 (4) 
\UTH205 (4) 
MATH 251 (4) 
BIOL 110 (4) 
PHSC 101 (4) 
ISTC201 (3) 
MUSC 101 (3) 
ART (3)fromGenEdI.E. 
HLTH 101 (3) 
SPPA205 (3) 
PSYC 101 (3) 
PSYC201 (3) 
SPED 301 (3) 
SPED XXX Field Experience 1 1 ) 

co-requisite with SPED 301 
EDUC203 (3) 
ELED322 (3) 

Students are responsible for ensuring that they meet the content 
requirements outlined above and the university's General 
Education requirements. 

Professional Education Courses 

Level I Courses 

ELED 363 Field Studies for Elementary Teaching (3) 

ELED 320 Foundations of Writing and Other Language Arts (3) 

ECED 201 Intervention and The Young Child (3) 

SPED 413 Assistive Technology for Students w-ith 

Disabilities K-12 (3) 
EDUC 417 Children's Literature and Other Materials for Reading 

and Language Arts in Elementan.' School (3) 
ELED 323 Principles and Practices of Instruction in Reading and 

Language Arts in the Elementary School (3) 

Level n Courses 

MATH 323 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (3) 

MATH 324 Supervised Observation/Participation in Elementary- 
School Mathematics (2) 

BIOL 303 Life Sciences (3) 

or 

PHSC 303 Earth-Space Science (3) 

SCIE 376 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3) 

SPED 425 Formal Tests and Measurements for Students with 

Disabilities, K-12 (3) 

SPED 441 Curriculum/Methods of Instruction for Students with 

Disabilities, K-12 (3) 



Level in Courses 

EESE 475 
ELED 311 



PDS Internship I (3) 

Child and the Elementary School Curriculum and 

Assessment (3) 
ELED 429 Methods and Practices of Assessment in Reading and 

Language Ans (3) 
SPED 429 Curriculum/Methods of Classroom Management for 

Students with Disabilities (3) 
SPED 469 Collaborative Teaching in the Elementary School (3) 

Level rV Courses 

EESE 476 PDS Internship II (12) 

EESE XXX Internship Seminar (3) 



Department of Reading, 
Special Education and 
Instructional Technology 

Professors: Karen Blaii; Deborah Gartland, Michael Hickey, Paul 

Jones (Chair), Barbara Laster, Jane Williams 
Associate Professors: Cellestine Cheeks, Darlene Fewster, Maya 

Kalyanpur, Amy Pleet, Robena Strosnider, David Wizer 
Assistant Professors: Poonam Arva, Heather Fox, Mark Hofer, 

Jeff Kenton, Davenia Lea, Frances Luther, Stephen Mogge, 

Sharon Pitcher, William Sadera, Liyan Song 
Lecturers: Steve Boone, Suzanne Bourdess, Sbaron Brown, 

Claudia Carlson, Elizabeth Dicembre, Barbara Ellis, Beverly 

German, Olga Kritskaya, Jon-David Knode, Joan McCarthy, 

Charles Meyer, Deborah Piper, Cinda Raley, Patricia Ryan, 

Terry Sullivan, Ronald Thomas, Cheryl Wood 
Visiting Instructors: Rosemary Rappa 
Director of the Educational Technology Center: Deborah Fuller 

OFFICE 

Hawkins Hall 207, 410-704-4384, or 410-704-2576 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Reading, Special Education and Instructional 
Technology is responsible for courses that are not limited to a sin- 
gle teacher education program. The education course listings 
include core education courses that provide knowledge and skills 
for general application in teaching and training areas. The instruc- 
tional technology and special education offerings also have K-12 
applications. 

The department coordinates the reading programs and the 
Reading Center, Developmental Reading courses, Special 
Education, and Instructional Technology. Graduate programs 
include the Master of Arts in Teaching and the master's programs 
in Reading, Instructional Technology and Special Education. 

MAJOR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 
Infant/Primary Track 

Director: Mava Kalyanpur 
Hawkins Hall 409, 410-704-3122 

Students majoring in Special Education complete the 
Infant/Primary Track (birth-grade 3). To meet the requirements of 
the College of Education and the Maryland State Department of 
Education, students must complete all required General Education 
and professional education courses for the Infant/Primary Track to 
earn a total of 131 units. Students must maintain an overall cumu- 
lative GPA of 2.75 or higher and a 3.00 GPA or higher in courses 
for the major. 

Elementary/Middle Track 

Director: Darlene Fewster 
Hawkins Hall 103A, 410-''04-2459 

Students majoring in Elementary Special Education complete the 
Elementary Track (grades 1-8). To meet the requirements of the 
College of Education and the Maryland State Department of 
Education, students must complete all required General Education 
and professional education courses required for the 
Elementary/Middle Track to earn a total of 128 units. Students 
must maintain an overall cumulative GPA of 2.75 or higher and a 
3.00 GPA or higher in courses for the major. 



The College of Education 



Secondary/ Adult Track 

Director: Charles Meyer 
Hawkins Hall 305, 410-704-4915 

Students majoring in Secondary Special Education complete the 
Secondary/Adult Track (grade 6-adult). To meet the requirements 
of the College of Education and the Maryland State Department of 
Education, students must complete all required General Education 
and professional education courses for their concentration to earn 
a total of 134-135 units. Students must maintain an overall cumu- 
lative GPA of 2.75 or higher and a 3.00 GPA or higher in courses 
for their major 

Special Education majors should meet with their advisers every 
term to ensure that their planned programs of study meet universi- 
ty, major and Maryland State Department of Education certifica- 
tion requirements. Students must consult with their advisers prior 
to taking courses on a Pass grading option. Courses in the major 
and courses required for Maryland State Department of Education 
certification must not be taken with this option. 

Exceptions, changes, waivers, and/or substitutions from the pro- 
gram pattern for Special Education majors m content or sequence 
are permitted only with the written consent of the director of the 
Special Education Program. 

MAJOR IN INTEGRATED ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION-SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Director: Debi Gartland 

Elementary Education majors may elect to become certified in both 
Elementary and Special Education by selecting the integrated 
approach. This program, specially designed to integrate both 
majors, prepares students as elementary classroom teachers and as 
special education teachers. 

PRE-ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR 
ALL CANDIDATES 

Students mterested in majonng in Special Education must first gain 
admission to Towson University. Admission to the university, how- 
ever, does not guarantee admission to the Special Education major. 
Students must then complete a Declaration of Intended Major 
Form available through the Center for Professional Practice (CPP), 
Hawkins Hall, room 302, at which time they will be assigned a 
Special Education adviser All students applying for admission to a 
Teacher Education program at Towson University are required to 
complete a Criminal Background Disclosure Form. This form is to 
be notarized and sent to the director of the Center for Professional 
Practice to be kept on file. 

Screening 

Special Education is a screened major All candidates for the Special 
Education major may be ranked according to cumulative GPA in 
all college or university courses (transfer GPA and/or TU GPA). 
The number of students admitted during any given term is deter- 
mined by the number of seats available in courses which, in turn, is 
determined by available faculty resources. 

To receive approval for admission, students are required to: 

1. take a speech and hearing screening 

2. have a cumulative GPA of 2.75 or higher (which includes 
grades transferred to and grades earned at TU) 

3. have completed ENGL 102 with a grade of C or higher 

4. have completed 60 or more units 

5. have scores on the Praxis I at or above the level of standards 
established by the Maryland State Department of Education. 
(Information on the Praxis tests is available in the Center for 
Professional Practice, Hawkins Hall, room 302.) 

Screening occurs again for admission into student teaching. 
Students are required to have a cumulative GPA of 2.75 or higher 
and a GPA of 3.00 or higher in the major and must have completed 
a minimum of 90 units. All preservia; students in Teacher 



Education programs at Towson University whose program of study 
requires an intensive and extensive internship or student teaching 
experience in a public or private school setting (pre-K through 12), 
are required to undergo a criminal background check before begin- 
ning this experience. The criminal background check must be filed 
with the director of the Center for Professional Practice. 

Transfer Students 

The Special Education Program personnel are responsive to the 
transfer student and will accept those credits which are compatible 
with the General Education (GenEd) requirements. Special 
Education major and state certification requirements. Please note, 
although credits might qualify toward graduation, only an evalua- 
tion conducted by the Special Education director will determine 
which credits will also apply toward the major Students must first 
have their transcripts evaluated by the Office of Admissions before 
requesting a special education transcript evaluation. 

The Professional Year 

Special Education majors follow the school system calendar for the 
Professional Development School to which they are assigned as 
interns or student teachers. The professional year starts in August 
when the teachers begin the school year and follows the school sys- 
tem spring break schedule. 

REQUIRED UNIVERSITY AND DEPARTMENTAL 
COURSES IN INFANT/PRIMARY SPECIAL 
EDUCATION TRACK 

Academic Content 

Courses taken before formal admission to the professional educa- 
tion sequence. 
I. English (9 units) 

(I.A) ENGL 102 Writing for a Liberal Education (3) 

(II.C.3) ENGL XXX 'Choose an English course from 1LC.3 (3) 
ENGL xxx Elective (3) 

n. Social Studies (9 units) 

(II.D) GEOG 102 World Regional Geography (3) 

or 
GEOG 105 Geography of International Affairs (3) 
(Il.B. 1 ) HIST 1 45 History of the U.S. to the Mid- 1 9th Century 

(3) 



HIST 146 
(ILB.2) SOCI 101 



History of the U.S. since the Mid- 19th Century 

(3) 

Introduction to Sociology (3) 



ni. Science (8 units) 

(II.A.l) BIOL 110 Contemporary General Biology (4) 

(ILA.l) PHSClOl Physical Science I (4) 

IV. Mathematics (12 units) 

MATH 204 Math Concepts and Structures I (4) 

(I.C) MATH 205 Math Concepts and Structures II (4) 

MATH 25 1 Elements of Geometry (4) 



V. Art (3 units) 
(l.E) ART xxx 



'Choose one art course from l.E (3) 



i 



VI. Music (3 units) 

(II.C.l) MUSC 101 Introduction to Music of Western Heritage (3) 

Vn. Psychology (6 units) 

(II.C.2) PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) 

or PSYC 102 Honors Introduction to Psychology (3) 
PSYC 201 Educational Psychology (3) 



Department of Reading, Special Education and Instructional Technology 



vm. 

(I.B) 
(II.B.3) 



(I.D) 



Additional Required Courses (18 units) 



ISTC201 
ISTC 301 
HITH 101 

SPPA 205 
ECED201 
EDUC301 



ECED 422 



SPED 301 



Using Information Effectively in Education (3) 

Utilization of Instructional Media (3) 

Wellness for a Diverse Society (3) 

or 

Basic Sign Language (3) 

Intervention and the Young Child (3) 

Writing and Communication Skills for 

Teachers (3| 

or 

Writing Techniques for Teachers m Early 

Childhood Education (3) 

Introduction to Special Education (3) 



''Refer to the explanation of the General Education requirements in this 
catalog. 

Professional Education Courses - Infant/Primary 

First Term (15 units) 

ECED 321 Foundations of Reading and Language Arts (3) 

SPED 425 Formal Tests and Measurements for Students with 

DisabiUties K-12 (3) 
ECED 315 Infant Intervention (3) 

SPED 428 Working with Families of Students with Disabilities (3) 

SPED 441 Curriculum/Methods of Instruction for Students with 

Disabilities (3) 

Second Term (18 units) 

ECED 360 Early Literacy Practice & Materials (3) 

SPED 415 Assessment of Infant/Primary Students with 

Disabilities (3) 
SPED 430 Informal Tests and Measurements of Students with 

Disabilities K-12 (3) 
SCIE 371 Teaching Science in Early Childhood (2) 

MUED 304 Methods of Teaching. Music in Early Childhood (2) 
ARED 373 Art for Early Childhood Education (2) 
SPED 413 Assistive Technology (3) 



Third Term (15 units) 

SPED 497 Internship: Students with Disabilities in Infant/Primary 

Programs (3) 
SPED 429 Curriculum/Methods of Classroom Management (3) 

ECED 361 Teaching Reading in Primary Grades (3) 
ECED 429 Principles & Practices of Reading (3) 
MATH 321 Teaching Math in Early Childhood Education (3) 

Fourth Term (15 units) 

SPED 498 Student Teaching: Special Education (12) 

SPED 493 Student Teaching Seminar ( 3 ) 

REQUIRED UNIVERSITY AND DEPARTMENTAL 
COURSES IN ELEMENTARY/MIDDLE SPECIAL 
EDUCATION TRACK 

Academic Content 

Courses to be taken before formal admission to the professional 

education sequence. 

1. English (9 units) 

(LA) ENGL 102 Writing for a Liberal Education (3) 

ENGL Elective (3) 

ENGL Elective (3) 



n. Social Studies (9 units) 



(II.B.l) HIST 145 



(n.B.2) 

(n.D) 



HIST 146 
SOCl 101 
GEOG 102 

GEOG 105 



History of the U.S. to the Mid- 19th 

Century (3) 

or 

History of the U.S. since the Mid- 1 9th Century (3) 

Introduction to Sociology (3) 

World Regional Geography (3) 

or 

Geography of International Affairs (3) 



III. Science (8 units) 

(II.A.l) BIOL no Contemporan' General Biology (4) 

(ILA.l) PHSC lOI Physical Science 1 (4) 

rV. Mathematics (12 units) 

MATH 204 Math Concepts and Structures I (4) 
(I.C) MATH 205 Math Concepts and Structures II (4) 

MATH 251 Elements of Geometry (4) 

V. Art (3 units) 

(I.E) ART XXX 'Choose one art course from I.E.(3) 

or 
THEA 101 Acting I (3) 

VI. Music (3 units) 

(II.C.l) MUSC 101 Introduction to Music Western Heritage (3) 

Vn. Psychology (6 units) 

(1I.C.2) PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) 

or PSYC 102 Honors Introduction to Psychology (3) 

PSYC 201 Educational Psychology (3) 

vm. Additional Required Courses (12 units) 
(II.B.3) SPPA 205 Basic Sign Language (3) 
or 
COMM 131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 
(II.C.3) EDUC 203 Teaching and Learning in a Diverse 

Society (3) 
(I.D) EDUC 301 Writing and Communication Skills for 

Teachers (3) 
SPED 301 Introduction to Special Education (3) 

IX. Technology (6 units) 

(I.B) ISTC 201 Using Information Effectively in 

Education (3) 
ISTC 301 Utilization of Instructional Media (3) 

Note; Approved courses for General Education categories. Those listed are 
recommended for Special Education majors. 

Professional Education Courses - Elementary/Middle 

First Term (15 units) 

SPED 425 Formal Tests and Measurements for Students with 

Disabilities K-12 (3) 
PSYC 203 Human Development (3) 

SPED 428 Working with Families of Students with Disabilities (3) 

ELED 322 Foundations of Reading and Other Language Arts (3) 

ELED 417 Childen's Literature (3) 

Second Term (15 units) 

SPED 430 Informal Tests and Measurements of Students with 

Disabilities K-12 (3) 
SPED 441 Curriculum/.Methods of Instruction for Students with 

Disabilities K-12 (3) 
PSYC 403 Psychology of Infancy and Childhood (3) 

SPED 413 Assistive Technology (3) 

SPED 427 Curriculum/Methods of Social, Emotional, and Motor 

Development of Students with Disabilities K-12 (3) 

Third Term (15 units) 

SPED 491 Internship: Students with Disabilities in 

Elementary/Middle Programs (3) 
ELED 429 Methods/Practices of Assessment in Reading and 

Language Arts (3) 
SPED 429 Curriculum/Methods of Classroom Management (3) 

SPED 451 Psychocducational Assessment of Students with 

Disabilities at the Elementary/Middle Level (3) 
ELED 323 Principles and Practices of Intruction in Reading and 

Language Arts in Elementary Schools (3) 



The College of Education 



Fourth Term (IS units) 

SPED 498 Student Teaching: Special Education (12) 

SPED 493 Student Teaching Seminar ( 3 ) 

REQUIRED UNIVERSITY AND DEPARTMENTAL 
COURSES IN SECONDARY/ ADULT SPECIAL 
EDUCATION TRACK 

Students majoring in Secondary Special Education must choose 
one of the following tracks: English, Science, Math or Social 
Science. 

English Track: Academic Content (total 134 units) 

Courses to be taken before formal admission to the professional 

education sequence: 

I. English (21 units) 

(I.A) ENGL 102 Writing for a Liberal Education (3) 

British Literature to 1798 (3) 

or 

British Literature since 1798 (3) 

Survey of African-American Literature (3) 

or 

Ethnic-American Literature (3) 

Main Currents in American Literature (3) 

or 

American Indian Literature 1772-Present 

(3) 

Applied Grammar (3) 

Introduction to Creative Writing (3) 

or 

Writing Poetry (3) 

or 

Writing Fiction (3) 

Literary Research and Applied Criticism (3) 

n. Social Studies (9 units) 

(II.D) GEOG 102 World Regional Geography (3) 

or 
GEOG 105 Geography of International Affairs (3) 
(ILB.l) HIST 145 Historv of the U.S. to the Mid-19th Century 
(3) 
or 
HIST 146 History of the U.S. since the Mid-19th 
Century (3) 
(II.B.2) SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) 



(II.C.l) 


ENGL 221 




ENGL 222 


(II.C.3) 


ENGL 233 




ENGL 235 




ENGL 230 




ENGL 236 




ENGL 251 




ENGL 283 




ENGL 311 




ENGL 312 




ENGL 361 



DL Science (8 units) 
(II.A.l) BIOL 110 
(II.A.l) PHSC 101 



Contemporary General Biology (4) 
Physical Science I (4) 



IV. Mathematics (8 units) 

(I.C) MATH 204 Math Concepts and Structures I (4) 

MATH 205 Math Concepts and Structures 11 (4) 



V. Art (3 units) 
(I.E.) ART ,\xx 

VL Psychology (9 units) 
(1I.C.2) PSYC 101 

PSYC 102 
PSYC 201 
PSYC 203 



*Choose one art course from I.E. (3) 



Introduction to Psychology (3) 

or 

Honors Introduction to Psychology (3) 

Educational Psychology (3) 

Human Development (3) 



VII. Additional Required Courses (15 units) 

(I.B) ISTC 201 Using Information Effectively in Education 

(3) 
(II. B. 3) COMM 131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 
(I.D) EDUC 301 Writing and Communication Skills for 

Teachers (3| 
ISTC 301 Utilization of Instructional Media (3) 

SPED 301 Introduction to Special Education (3) 



Professional Education Courses - Secondary/Adult - English Track 

First Term (16 units) 

SPED 425 Formal Tests and Measurements for Students with 

Disabilities K-12 (3) 
SCED 341 Principles of Secondary Education (3) 

SCED 460 Using Reading and Writing in Secondary Education (4) 

SPED 428 Working with Families of Students with Disabilities (3) 

SPED 441 Curriculum/Methods of Instruction for Students with 

Disabilities (3) 



Second Term (IS units) 

SPED 430 Informal Tests and Measurements of Students with 

Disabilities K-12 (3) 
EDUC 401 Foundations of Education (3) 
SPED 413 Assistive Technology (3) 

PSYC 404 Adolescent Psychology (3) 

SCED 419 Young Adult Literature (3) 



Third Term (IS units) 

SPED 496 Internship; Students with Disabilities in Secondary/Adult 

Programs (3) 
SPED 453 Curriculumy Methods of Secondary Special Education and 

Transition (3) 
SPED 429 Curriculum/Methods of Classroom Management (3) 

SCED 357 Teaching English in Secondary Education (3) 

ENGL XXX English elective (3) 

Fourth Term (IS units) 

SPED 498 Student Teaching: Special Education (12) 

SPED 461 Teaching Reading in Secondary Content Areas (3) 

Science Track: Academic Content (total 13S units) 

Courses to be taken before formal admission to the professional 

education sequence: 

I. English (6 units) 

(I.A) ENGL 102 

(II.C.3) ENGL 233 

ENGL 235 



Writing for a Liberal Education (3) 

Survey of African-American Literature (3) 

or 

Ethnic-American Literature (3) 



n. Social Studies (9 units) 

(II.D) GEOG 102 World Regional Geography (3) 



(ILB.l) 



(II.B.2) 



GEOG 105 
HIST 145 

HIST 146 

SOCI 101 



m. Science (23 units) 
(II.A.l) BIOL 201 
(II.A.l) PHSC 101 
GEOL 121 
PHSC 303 
CHEM 110 
BIOL 115 



Geography of International Affairs (3) 

History of the U.S. to the Mid-19th Century (3) 

or 

History of the U.S. since the Mid- 19th 

Century (3) 

Introduction to Sociology (3) 



Biology I: Cellular Biology and Genetics (4) 

Physical Science I (4) 

Physical Geology (4) 

Earth-Space Science (3) 

General Chemistry I (4) 

Biological Science I (4) 



rV. Mathematics (8 units) 

(I.C) MATH 204 Math Concepts and Structures I (4) 

MATH 205 Math Concepts and Structures II (4) 



V. Art (3 units) 
(LE.) ART XXX 

VI. Music (3 units) 

MUSC 101 



"Choose one art course from I.E. (3) 



Introduction to Music of the Western Heritage (3) 



Vn. Psychology (6 units) 

(II.C.2) PSYC 10 1 Introduction to Psychology (3) 

or 
PSYC 102 Honors Introduction to Psychology (3) 

PSYC 201 Educational Psychology (3) 



Department of Reading, Special Education and Instructional Technology 



Vni. Additional Required Courses (15 units) 

(l.B) ISTC 201 Using Information F.tfectively in Education (3) 

(II. B. 3) COMM 131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 
(I.D) EDUC 301 Writmg and Communication Skills for 

Teachers (3) 
ISTC 301 Utilization of Instructional Media (3) 

SPED 301 Introduction to Special Education (3) 

Professional Education Courses - Secondary/ Adult - 

Science Track 

First Terin (16 units) 

SPED 425 Formal Tests and Measurements for Students with 

Disabilities K-12 (3) 
SCED 341 Principles of Secondary Education (3) 

SCED 460 Using Reading and Writing in Secondary Education (4) 

SPED 42S Workmg with Families of Students with Disabilities (3) 

SPED 441 Curriculum/Methods of Instruction for Students with 

Disabilities (3) 

Second Term (15 units) 

SPED 430 Informal Tests and Measurements of Students with 

Disabilities K-12 (3) 
EDUC 401 Foundations of Education (3) 

SPED 4 1 3 Assistive Technology ( 3 ) 

PSYC 404 Adolescent Psychology (3) 

PSYC 203 Human Development (3) 

Third Term (16 units) 

SPED 496 Internship: Students with Disabilities in Secondary/Adult 

Programs (3) 
SPED 453 Curriculum/ Methods of Secondary Special Education 

and Transition (3) 
SPED 429 Curriculum/Methods of Classroom Management (3) 

SCIE 380 Teaching Science in Secondary Education (3) 

SCIE XXX Science elective (4) 

Fourth Term (15 units) 

SPED 498 Student Teaching: Special Education (12) 

SPED 461 Teaching Reading in Secondary Content Areas (3) 

Math Track: Academic Content (total 135 units) 
Courses to be taken before formal admission to the professional 
education sequence: 
I. English (6 units) 

(I.A) ENGL 102 Writmg for a Liberal Education (3) 

(n.C.3) ENGL 233 Survey of African-American Literature (3) 
or 
ENGL 235 Ethnic-American Literature (3) 

n. Social Studies (9 units) 

(n.Dl GEOG 102 World Regional Geography (3) 

or 
GEOG 105 Geography of International Affairs (3) 
(n.B.2) SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) 
(n.B.l) HIST 145 HistoryoftheU.S. to the Mid-1 9th Century (3) 
or 
HIST 1 46 History of the U.S. smce the Mid- 1 9th 
Century (3) 



in. Science (8 units) 

(ILA.ll BIOL 110 
(II. A. 1) PHSC 101 



Contemporary General Biology (4) 
Physical Science I (4) 



rv. Mathematics (23 units) 

(I.C) .\1.ATH 204 Math Concepts and Structures I (4) 

.VIATH 205 .Math Concepts and Structures II (4) 

MATH 206 Number Systems and Functions (4) 

MATH 207 Quantitative and Geometric Reasoning (4) 

MATH 23 1 Basic Statistics (3) 

MATH 251 Elements of Geometry (4) 



V. Art (3 units) 
(I.E) ART XXX 

VI. Music (3 units) 

MUSC 101 



'Choose one art course from I.E. (3) 



Introduction to .Music of Western Heritage (3) 



Vn. Psychology (6 units) 

(II.C.2) PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) 
or 
PSYC 102 Honors Introduction to Psychology (3) 
PSYC 201 Educational Psychology (3) 

\TI1. Additional Required Courses (15 units) 



(LB) 

(I1.B.3) 

(I.D) 



ISTC 201 
COMM 131 
EDUC 301 

ISTC 301 
SPED 301 



Using Information Effectively in Education (3) 
Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 
Writing and Communication Skills for 
Teachers (3) 

Utilization of Instructional -Media (3) 
Introduction to Special Education (3) 



■ Secondarv/ Adult - Math Track 



Professional Education Courses ■ 
First Term (16 units) 

SPED 425 Formal Tests and Measurements for Students with 

Disabilities K-12 (3) 
SCED 341 Principles of Secondary Education (3) 

SCED 460 Using Reading and Writing in Secondary Education (4) 

SPED 428 Working with Families of Students with Disabilities (3) 

SPED 441 Curriculum/Methods of Instruction for Students with 

Disabilities (3) 

Second Term (15 units) 

SPED 430 Informal Tests and .Measurements of Students with 

DisabihtiesK-12 (3) 
EDUC 401 Foundations of Education (3) 
SPED 413 -Assistive Technology (3) 

PSYC 404 Adolescent Psychology (3) 

PSYC 203 Human Development (3) 



Third Term (15 units) 

SPED 496 Internship: Students with Disabilities in Secondary/Adult 

Programs (3) 
SPED 453 Curriculum/ Methods of Secondary Special Education and 

Transition (3) 
SPED 429 Curriculum/Methods of Classroom Management (3) 

MATH 423 Teaching Math in Secondary' Education (3) 
MATH XXX Math elective (3) 

Fourth Term (15 units) 

SPED 498 Student Teaching: Special Education (12) 

SPED 461 Teaching Reading in Secondary Content Areas (3) 

Social Science Track: Academic Content (total 134 units) 

Courses to be taken before formal admission to the professional 
education sequence: 
I. English (6 units) 

(I.A) ENGL 102 Writing for a Liberal Education (3) 
(1I.C.3) ENGL 233 Survey of African-.-Vmerican Literature (3) 
or 
ENGL 235 Ethnic-.^merican Literature (3) 



n. Social Studies (24 units) 



(3) 



(II.D) GEOG 102 World Regional Geography I 

or 
GEOG 105 Geography of International Affairs (3) 
pose 101 Introduction to Political Science (3) 
(II.B.l) HIST 145 History of the U.S. to the Mid- 19th Century (3) 

HIST 146 History of the U.S. since the Mid- 19th Century (3) 
HIST 102 History of European Civilization through the 

17th Century (3) 
HIST 103 History of European Civilization from the 

17th Century (3) 
SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) 
ECON 201 Microeconomic Principles (3) 



The College of Education 



ni. Science (8 units) 

(ii.A.i) BIOL no 

(II.A.l) PHSC 101 



Contemporary General Biology (4) 
Physical Science I (4) 



TV. Mathematics (8 units) 

(I.C) MATH 204 Math Concepts and Structures I (4) 

MATH 205 Math Concepts and Structures II (4) 



'Choose one art course from I.E. (3) 



V Art (3 units) 
(I.E.) ART XXX 

VI. Psychology (9 units) 

(II.C.2) PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) 
or 

PSYC 102 Honors Introduction to Psychology (3) 

PSYC 201 Educational Psychology (3) 

PSYC 203 Human Development (3) 

Vn. Additional Required Courses (15 units) 

(I.B) ISTC 201 Using Information Effectively in Education (3) 

(II.B.3) CO.\lM131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 
(I.D) EDUC 301 Writing and Communication Skills for Teachers (3) 
ISTC 301 Utilization of Instructional .Media (3) 
SPED 301 Introduction to Special Education (3) 

Professional Education Courses - Secondary/Adult - 

Social Science Track 

First Term (16 units) 

SPED 425 Formal Tests and .Measurements for Students with 

Disabilities K-12 (3) 
SCED 341 Principles of Secondary Education (3) 

SCED 460 Using Reading and Writing in Secondary Education (4) 

SPED 42S Working with Families of Students with Disabilities (3) 

SPED 441 Curriculum/Methods of Instruction for Students with 

Disabilities (3) 

Second Term (15 units) 

SPED 430 Informal Tests and Measurements of Students with 

Disabilities K-12 (3) 
EDUC 401 Foundations of Education (3) 
SPED 413 Assistive Technology (3) 

PSYC 404 Adolescent Psychology (3) 

Social Science elective (3) 



Third Term (15 units) 

SPED 496 Internship: Students with Disabilities in Secondary/Adult 

Programs (3) 
SPED 453 Curriculum/ Methods of Secondary Special Education and 

Transition (3) 
SPED 429 Curriculum/.Methods of Classroom Management (3) 

SCED 355 Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Education (3) 

Social Science elective (3) 

Fourth Term (15 units) 

SPED 498 Student Teaching: Special Education ( 12) 

SPED 461 Teaching Reading in Secondary Content Areas (3) 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR INTEGRATED 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION - SPECIAL 
EDUCATION MAJORS 

Academic Content 

Courses to be taken before fortnal admission to the professional 
education sequence. 
ENGL 102 (3) 
English Elective (3) 

(Literature course recommended) 
HIST 145 or 146 (3) 
History Elective (3) 

(Non-Western course recommended) 
SOCI 101 (3) 



MATH 204 (4) 

MATH 205 (4) 

MATH 251 (4) 

BIOL 110 (4) 

PHSC 101 (4) 

ISTC 201 (3) 

MUSC 101 (3) 

ART (3) from GenEd I.E 

HLTH 101 (3) 

SPPA205 (3) 

PSYC 101 (3) 

PSYC 201 (3) 

SPED 301 (3) 

SPED XXX Field Experience ( 1 ) 

co-requisite with SPED 301 
EDUC 203 (3) 
ELED 322 (3) 

Students are responsible for ensuring that they meet the content 
requirements outlined above and the university's General 
Education requirements. 

Professional Education Courses 

Level 1 Courses 

ELED 363 Field Studies for Elementary Teaching (3) 

ELED 321 (2nd Advanced Writing Course) (3) 

ELED 310 Child Development (3) 

SPED 413 Assistive Technology for Students with 

Disabilities K-12 (3J 
EDUC 417 Children's Literature and Other Materials for Reading 

and Language Arts in Elementary School (3) 
ELED 323 Principles and Practices of Instruction in Reading and 

Language Arts in the Elementary School (3) 

Level n Courses 

MATH 323 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (3) 

MATH 324 Supervised Observation/Participation in Elementary 

School Mathematics (2) 
BIOL 303 Life Sciences (3) 

or 
PHSC 303 Earth-Space Science (3) 

SCIE 376 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3) 

SPED 425 Formal Tests and .Measurements for Students with 

Disabilities, K-12 (3| 
SPED 441 CurriculumyMethods of Instruction for Students with 

Disabilities, K-12 (3) 

Level III Courses 

ELSE 475 PDS Internship 1 (3) 

ELED 311 Child and the Elementary School Curriculum and 

Assessment (3) 
ELED 429 .Methods and Practices of Assessment in Readmg and 

Language Arts (3) 
SPED 429 Curriculuin/.Methods of Classroom Management for 

Students with Disabilities (3) 
SPED 469 Collaborative Teaching in the Elementary School (3) 



Level IV Courses 

EESE 476 
ELED-SPED XXX 



PDS Internship II (12) 
Internship .Seminar (3) 



Department of Secondary Education 



GRADUATE PROGRAM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Director: Amy Fleet 
Hawkins Hall', 402 A, 410-704-6001 

This Master of Education program prepares currently certified 
teachers for careers as special educators and special education spe- 
cialist/leaders. The Certification Track meets the requirements for 
MSDE generic special education certification at early childhood, 
elementary or secondary levels. The Teacher as Leader Track satis- 
fies 12 of the 18 units of the Maryland Administrator I Certificate 
and offers a choice of three focus areas for further study in tech- 
nology, inclusion or transition to adulthood. The Master of Arts in 
teaching offers certification in special education for individuals 
who hold an undergraduate degree outside of education. See the 
Graduate Catalog for details 

GRADUATE STUDY IN READING 

Director: Barbara Laster 
Hawkins Hall 107-G, 410-704-2556 

A graduate program specifically designed to improve the teaching 
of reading at all age levels is available for qualified students seek- 
ing Maryland State Certification as Reading Specialist K-12. See 
the Graduate Catalog for details. 

DEVELOPMENTAL READING 

Director: L. Steven Boone 
Hawkins Hall 206, 410-704-3697 

Remediation in reading skills is provided for Towson students 
through the developmental studies courses in reading scheduled by 
the Department of Reading, Special Education and Instructional 
Technology. See competency requirements for entering students 
under the Academic Achievement Center section in Academic 
Resources. Informational sessions for the Praxis are also conducted. 

GRADUATE STUDY IN INSTRUCTIONAL 
TECHNOLOGY 

Director: David Wizer 
Hawkins Hall 402D, 410-704-6268 

The Department of Reading, Special Education and Instructional 
Technology offers a comprehensive graduate program which pre- 
pares professionals for careers in the instructional media field. The 
Instructional Development Concentration is intended for those 
who wish to prepare for training and media positions in business, 
community and governmental settings. The School Library Media 
Concentration is intended for the person who plans to direct a 
School Library Media Center. Persons holding this degree are eli- 
gible for certification by the Maryland State Department of 
Education as an Educational Media Generalist (Level II). The 
Educational Technology Track is designed for those who wish to 
integrate technology into classroom teaching, or to coordinate the 
planning and integration of educational technologies at the school, 
district or state level. See the Graduate Catalog for details. 



Department of 
Secondary Education 

Professors: David Vocke {Chair), James Lawlor, Gloria Neubert, 

Thomas Proffitt 
Associate Professor: Cynthia Hartzler-Miller 
Assistant Professors: Todd Kenreich, Barri Tinkler 
Lecturers: Nancy Boyd, Jack Cole, Susan Hanson, David 

Lovewell, Allan Starkey 

OFFICE 

Hawkins Hall 405K, 410-704-2562 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The mission of the Teacher Education LInit is to inspire, educate 
and prepare facilitators of active learning for diverse and inclusive 
communities of learners in environments that are technologically 
advanced. 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Secondary Education offers 13 certification 
programs in the secondary subject areas of biology, chemistry, 
earth-space science, English, French, geography, German, history, 
mathematics, physics, school health, social science and Spanish. 

Programs for teaching kindergarten through grade 12 in Art, 
Dance, Library/Media, Music and Physical Education are offered 
by these academic departments. 

All Teacher Education programs are approved by the Maryland 
State Department of Education and the National Council for the 
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Upon graduation in 
one of these programs, students are eligible for certification to 
teach in Maryland. 

The programs of education for junior, middle and high school 
teachers are designed to bring about close integration between 
teaching methods and the practical experience of observation and 
student teaching. Students are required to file a Declaration of 
Intention Form. A Secondary Education adviser is required in addi- 
tion to an adviser in the major for the following majors: English 
Education, Geography Education, History Education, Mathematics 
Education, Modern Language Education, Science (Biology, 
Chemistry, Earth-Space Science and Physics) Education or Social 
Science Education. For information, go to Hawkins Hall, room 
405K. 

FORMAL ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM 

Formal admission into the Secondary Education Program occurs 
when students have met the following criteria: 

1. completion of at least 45 college units 

2. completion of a written application, including an essay 

3. a 2.50 cumulative GPA for all postsecondary institutions 
attended (submit original transcripts) 

4. presentation of Score Reporting Form for passing scores on 
Praxis I — Academic Skills Assessment: Reading, Writing and 
Mathematics to the Center for Professional Practice for admis- 
sion to the program. Information on the Praxis tests is avail- 
able in the Center for Professional Practice, Hawkins Hall, 
room 302.) 

5. All students applying for admission to a Teacher Education 
program at Towson University are required to complete a 
Criminal Background Disclosure Form. This form is to be 
notarized and sent to the director of the Center for 
Professional Practice to be kept on file. 

Once passing scores for Praxis I are received, students are permitted 
to enroll in Principles of Secondary Education and Using Reading 
and Writing in the Secondary School. Prior to program admission, 



The College of Education 



students are permitted to take only Educational Psychology, 
Introduction to Special Education, K-12, Foundations of 
Education, and Utilization of Instructional Media from the educa- 
tion program. 

Information on Praxis testing is available in the Center for 
Professional Practice (Hawkins Hall, room 302). Students must 
secure approval for student teaching from the department; it is 
contingent upon successful completion of the required courses, 
demonstration of acceptable competencies in the tested areas, and 
meeting GPA requirements (see GPA Requirement for Student 
Teaching). 

After introductory courses in the nature of today's schools and 
their students and appropriate field experiences, the prospective 
secondary teacher enters the student teaching term which begins 
prior to the start of the TU term. Methods, philosophy, techniques 
and practice are combined to provide a thorough preparation for 
teaching, and such preparation must be demonstrated prior to stu- 
dent teaching. 

SECONDARY TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

In addition to majoring in one of the 13 suh|ect area certification 
programs and satisfying the university General Education (GenEd) 
requirements, students must complete the professional education 
courses listed below. 

Outcomes 

The Department of Secondary Education utilizes the Interstate 
New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASCI 
Principles as the performance-based outcomes for teacher 
candidates. 

Required Professional Education Courses 

A minimum grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher is required for all 

courses. 

PSYC 201 Educational Psychology (3): 

(prerequisite course-PSYC 101) 
SPED 301 Introduction to Special Education (3) 

ISTC 301 Utilizing Instructional Media (3) 

EDUC 401 Foundations of Education (3) 
SCED 341 Principles of Secondary Education (4) 

SCED 460 Using Reading and Writing in the Secondary 

School (4) (taken concurrently with SCED 341 and 

shares a required field experience) 
SCED 499 Internship in Secondary Education (6) 

(taken at a professional development school the fall or 

spring term, whichever precedes the student teaching 

term, with Methods of Teaching Major Subject) 
SCED x.\x Methods of Teaching Major Subject (3) 

SCED XXX Student Teaching ( 12) 

SCED 461 Teaching Reading in the Secondary Content Areas (3)' 

(taken concurrendy with Student Teaching) 
Addilioihil requirements to he integrated into GenEds: 
HIST 14.5 History of U.S. to Mid- 1 9th Century (ll.B.l) (3) 

or 
HIST 146 History of U.S. since Mid-19th Century (ll.B.l) (3) 

COMM 13 I Fundamentals of Speech Communication (II.B.3) (3) 

Fulfillment of the CenFd Category II. C. 3. Western 

Heritage: Cultural Plurality and Diversity 

or 

GenEd II. D. Global Awareness: Non- Western Cultures, 

Traditions, Issues 
Note: Some methods courses are offered spring or fall only. Check with 
your adviser. 



Subject Major 

Refer to the department under which a specific major is discussed. 
For instance, those interested in teaching history at the secondary 
level should tefer to the Secondary Education program of the 
Department of History for specific requirements. 

The Professional Year 

As part of their year-long professional intetnship, all teacher can- 
didates begin their Professional Development School intetnship 
prior to the start of the tegular Towson University term. This date 
varies by school system, and candidates must plan appropriately to 
fulfill their program requirements. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENT TEACHING 

1. All students must meet the following GPA requirements to be 
admitted to student teaching: 2.75 GPA in majot field and in 
professional education courses and 2.50 overall GPA, based on 
transcripts from all institutions of higher learning attended. 
(Consult with SCED adviser.) 

2. All pre service students in Teacher Education programs at 
Towson University whose program of study requires an intensive 
and extensive internship or student teaching experience in a pub- 
lic or private school setting (pre-K through 12) are required to 
undergo a criminal background check before entering this expe- 
rience. The criminal background check must be filed with Karen 
Schafer, the director of the Center for Professional Practice. 

KINDERGARTEN-12th GRADE 
TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

Students may obtain certification to teach the following subjects at 
both the elementary and secondary levels: art, dance, hbrary media, 
music and physical education. 

Teacher Education ptograms exist in the following areas: 

• Art Education 

• Dance Education 

• Library Media 

• Music Education 

• Physical Education 

For required courses and special program information, consult the 
section of this catalog dealing with each particular major. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Students wishing to major in Secondary Special Education should 
contact Patricia Mandell, Hawkins Hall 305, 410-704-4915. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING— SECONDARY 

Director: Debbie Piper 
Hawkins Hall 209, 410-704-4935 

The Master of Arts in Teaching program is designed to prepare 
especially qualified post-baccalaureate students for teaching certi- 
fications in grades 5 through 12. Consult the Graduate Catalog for 
more information. 




The College of Fine Arts and Communication 



The College of Fine Arts ami Communication (COFACj comitrises the depanments of Art. Dance, 
Electronic Media and Film. Mass Communication and Communication Studies. Music, and Theatre Arts. 
Through classroom and experiential preparation. COFAC's programs prepare graduates for exciting 
careers and/or graduate study. The broad liberal education we offer, along with specialized professiimid 
training in their respective fields, enables students to develop creative and analytical abilities tailored to 
their future aspirations. In fact, we not only provide intensive study for our majors and minors, we also offer 
all TU students the opportunity to participate in an e.xciting variety of academic and artistic experiences. 

In fall 2005, the renovation and addition of the Center for the Arts, the home of the departments of Art. 
Dance. Music and Theatre Arts will be completed. The building project doubles the size of the facilities 
available to students, adds a music recital hall, an MFA art gallery, an intimate lab theatre, and four state- 
of-the-art dance studios, including a studio-theatre space. The Center for the Arts will also house the .Asian 
Arts & Culture Center gallen,- and garden, and the Maryland .Arts Festival headquarters. The College of 
Fine Arts and Communication also maintains several additional spaces that assist students and faculty in 
activities supporting curricular offerings. These include Van Bokkelen Hall and the Media Center-housing 
journalism laboratories, the debate and speech facility. XTSR-AM. radio-lelevision-film laboratories, the 
television station and WMJF-TV-and Stephens Hall Theatre, which provides peiformance space for dance, 
opera and musicals. 

Recognized as a fine arts center for Maiyland. the college continues to pursue its mission to enhance 
communication and the fine and performing arts, and contribute to the cultural life ofTowson and Greater 
Baltimore through an annual program of events that includes more tlian 90 music perfortnances: at least 26 
student films: 17 dance events; numerous debates, lectures and workshops: no fewer than four mainstage 
plays: a daily campus television show: and eight to 10 art exhibits. 

The college also sponsors international exchange programs with .schools in China. Germany. Ireland, 
Korea. Russia, Italy and the Uiuted Kingdom. Please visit our Web site for more information. 



Art 

Art Education 
Dance Education 
Dance Performance 
Communication Studies 
Electronic Media and Film 
Mass Communication 
Music Education 
Music Performance 
Theatre 



Christopher Spicer, Dean 

Trudy Cobb Dennard, Associate Dean 

James Hunnicutt, Senior Assistant to the Dean/Operations 



COLLEGE OFEICE 

Center for the Arts 3001, 410-704-3288 

Fax: 410-704-6026 

www.towson.edu/tu/finearts 



The College of Fine Arts and Communication 



Department of Art 



Professors: Christopher Bartlett (Gallery Director), Jane Bates 

(Art Education Coordinator), Haig Janian, Jean M.K. Miller 

(Chair), James Paulsen 
Associate Professors: Daniel Brown, Susan Isaacs (Honors 

Coordinator), Robert Pitman, Stuart Stein, Bridget Sullivan 
Assistant Professors: Jan Baum (MFA Coordinator), Karl 

Fugelso, Siri Nadler, Nora Sturges, Sandra Tatman 
Visiting Assistant Professors: Katherine Broadwater, Tonia 

Matthews, Raymond Martens 
Lecturer: R. Jason Sloan 
Part-time Faculty: Jocelyn Curtis, Richard Heliman, Trace Miller, 

Michael Weiss 
Assistant to Chair: Leslie Varga 
Administrative Assistant: Marcia Ekpaha-Mensah 
Slide Librarian: Venecia Zachary 
Community Art Center Director: Bonnie Reynolds 
Director and Curator, Asian Arts & Culture Center: Suewhei Shieh 
Computer Lab Manager: Richard Thomas 



OFHCE 

Center for the Arts 3103, 410-704-2808 
www.towson.edu/art 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Art offers a comprehensive program compris- 
ing the following areas of concentration: Art History, Crafts, 
Industrial Design, Painting, Printmakmg, Sculpture, Graphic Design, 
Illustration and Photography. Associated with these concentra- 
tions, four degree programs are offered: the major in Art, the 
major in Art Education, the Master of Education in Art Education 
and the Master of Fine Arts. Minors are offered in Art History and 
Studio Art. 

The Department of Art offers a comprehensive, full-term travel- 
study abroad program as an integral part of the curriculum. 
Students register on campus but pursue art courses in a foreign 
locale under University System of Maryland faculty direction. 

The Department of Art offers non-credit art instruction 
throughout the year for children and adults through the 
Community Art Center. 

FACILITIES 

The facilities available to undergraduate and graduate students are 
extensive. They are designed to encourage and fully support the 
creative endeavors of students. Each area of concentration has the 
equipment necessary to assure that students reach their potential. 

MAJOR IN ART 

Art majors must complete 66 to 72 units in art, depending on con- 
centration and program option. As part of the total number of 
units, 36 units are taken in foundations. The First Level 
Foundation core (18 units) is identical for all majors. The Second 
Level Foundation core (18 units) is specific to the program option. 
(See Second Level Foundation courses listed under separate con- 
centrations/options.) All Art majors must successfully complete all 
of the first-year foundation courses listed below with a grade of at 
least a C before enrolling in any other art courses. 

First Level Foundation (18 units) 

ART 10,3 Design I (.3) 

ART 104 Design II (3) 

ART 111 Drawing and the Appreciation of Drawing 1(3) 

ART 211 Drawing II (3) 

ARTH221 Surveyof Western Art 1(3) 

ARTH 222 Survey of Western Art II (3) 



CRAFTS CONCENTRATION 

Students may select one of three program options within the Crafts 
Concentration: 1) Ceramics, 2) Metalsmithing and Jewelry or 3) 
Interdisciplinary Crafts. 

Ceramics Option (66 units) 

First Level Foundation (18 units) 

Second Level Foundation (18 units) 

ART 217 Introduction to Computer Media (3) 

or 
ART 2xx/3xx Any Crafts Course 
ART 229 Painting I (3) 

ART 231 Ceramics I (3) 

ART 241 Sculpture I (3) 

ARTH 3xx/4xx Any 300-400 Art History Course (6) 

Required Courses (15 units) 
ART 309 Ceramics: Potters Wheel (3) 

ART 310 Ceramics: Handbmlding (3) 

ART 407 Ceramics: Clay Sculpture I (3) 

ART 409 Ceramics: The Vessel (3) 

ART 497 Senior Project (3) 



Electives (15 units) 
ART 205 
ART 2xx/3xx 



ART 361 
ART 308' 
ART 312' 
ART 400 
ART 414-416 



The Human Figure (3) 

Any Crafts Course 

or 

Computer 3-D Modeling (3) 

Raku(3) 

Ceramics: Special Topics (3) 

Ceramics: Raw Materials (3) 

.advanced Studio in Ceramics 



3-9) 



* Offered only during Minimester 



Metalsmithing and Jewelry Option (66 units) 

First Level Foundation (18 units) 

Second Level Foundation (18 units) 
ART 229 Painting I (3) 

ART 241 Sculpture I (3) 

ART 2xx/3xx Anv Crafts Course 



.^RT 217 Introduction to Computer Media (3) 

ART 318 Jewelry I (3) 

ARTH 3xx/4xx Any 300-400-level Art History Course (6) 

Required Courses (15 units) 

ART3L3 Enameling I (3) 

ART 319 Metalsmithing I (3) 

ART 339 .Metal: (Concept and Process (3) 

ART 418 Jewelry 11 (3) 

ART 497 Senior Project (3) 



Electives (IS units) 


ART 234 


Photography I (3) 


ART 2xx/3xx 


.'\nv Crafts Course (3) 


ART 361 


Computer 3-D Modeling (3) 


ART 413 


Enameling II (3) 


ART 414 


Advanced Studio (3) 


ART 419 


lewelry III (3i 


ART 439 


Metalsmithing II (3) 


ART 490 


Internship (3) 



Department of Art 



Interdisciplinary Crafts Option (66 units) 

First Level Foundation (18 units) 

Second Level Foundation (18 units) 

ART 229 Painting 1 (3) 

ART 231 Ceramics 1(3) 

ART 241 Sculpture I (3) 

ART 318 Jewelry I (3) 

ART 3.XX Any Fibers Course (3) 

ARTH 3xx/4xx Any 300-400-level Art History Course (3) 

Required Courses (21 units) 

ART 497 Senior Project (3) 

ARTH 3xx/4xx Any 300-400-level Art History Course (3) 

Five courses selected from ceramics, jewelry, fibers, wood, and/or stained 

glass (15) 



Electives (9 units) 
ART 217 
ART 234 
ART 361 
ART 3xx/4xx 



ART 490 
THEA 249 



Introduction to Computer Media (3) 

Photography I (3) 

Computer 3-D Modeling (3) 

Any Advanced Level Jewelry, Metal, Ceramics, and/or 

Fibers Course (3) 

Internship in Art (3) 

Mask Tradition and Design (3) 



INDUSTRIAL DESIGN SCREENED 
CONCENTRATION (72 units) 

*Not admitthig new students fall 2005-spring 2007 
Prerequisites and procedures for Industrial Design screening: 

1. GPA of 3.00 m the major and 2.67 overall. 

2. The following courses must be completed by the end of the term 
in which the student applies to the Industrial Design 
Concentration: ART 103, ART 104, ART 111, ART 217, ART 
229, ARTH 221, ARTH 222. Students must complete the above 
courses, or equivalent transferred courses, with at least a B- (2.67) 
before taking further courses in the Industrial Design 
Concentration. 

3. At least a B (3.00) in ART 21 1 (Drawing II), ART 368 (Industrial 
Design I), and ARTH 327 (History of Modern Design). 

4. Submit a portfolio the second year of the four-year concentration 
to the Industrial Design faculty committee. To be considered in the 
screening process, students must submit the following by the last 
day of finals in a given term: an official transcript, an Industrial 
Design Screening Form and a sealed 18"x24" portfolio. The port- 
folio must include two pieces of work from ART 103, ART 211, 
ART 217, ART 229 and ART 468 (a total of 10 pieces). Students 
who do not submit a portfolio or who submit an incomplete port- 
folio will NOT be considered for the Industrial Design 
Concentration at that time. Late applications will not be consid- 
ered. 

5. Students not accepted into the concentration may reapply twice. 
If the student's GPA in the major falls below 3.00 and 2.67 over- 
all, he or she may have one probationary term to get the GPA in the 
major back to 3.00 and 2.67 overall. Students would not be eligi- 
ble to take further classes in the Industrial Design Concentration 
until they have been screened into the concentration. If the student 
does not raise his or her GPA in the major back to at least a 3.00 
and 2.67 overall by the end of the probationary term, then the stu- 
dent must leave the Industrial Design Concentration but can con- 
tinue in another area of the Art major. 

First Level Foundation (18 units) 

Second Level Foundation (18 units) 

ART 217 Introduction to Computer Media (3) 

ART 368 Industrial Design I (3) 

ART 241 Sculpture I (3) 

ART 361 Computer 3-D Modeling (3) 

ART 360 Computer Art I (3) 

ARTH 324 Modern Art II (3) 



Third Level Foundation (18 units) 

ART 468 Industrial Design II (3) 

ART 3xx 3-D Crafts Courses (jewelry, Ceramics, Furniture) (3) 

ARTH 327 History of Modern Design (3) 

ART 234 Photography I (3) 

or 
ART 229 Painting I (3) 

or 
ART 346 New Directions in Painting, Experimental Media and 

Art I (3) 
ART 366 Concept Model Making (3) 

ART 367 Theory and Application of Materials and Processes for 

Industrial Design (3) 

Fourth Level Foundation (18 units) 
ART 363 
ART 469 
ART 441 

ART 443 
ART 351 
ART 497 
ART 490 



Computer Multimedia I (3) 
Industrial Design 111 (3) 
Advanced Sculpture I (3) 
or 

Advanced Sculpture II (3) 
Writing about Art (3) 
Senior Project (3) 
Internship (3) 



PAINTING CONCENTRATION 

Students may select one of two program options within the 
Painting Concentration: Painting or Computer Art. 

Painting Option (66 units) 

First Level Foundation (18 units) 

Second Level Foundation (18 units) 

ART 205 The Human Figure (3) 

ART 229 Painnngl(3) 

ART 329 Painting II (3) 

ART 241 Sculpture I (3) 

ART 2x.x/3xx Any 200-300-level Crafts Course (3) 

ARTH 324 Modern Art II (3) 

Required Courses (21 units) 

ART 245 Introduction to Printmaking (3) 

ART 402 Life Drawing and Anatomy I (3) 

ARTH 3xx/4xx Any 300-400-level Art History Course (3) 

ART 336 Painnng III (3) 

ART 346 New Directions in Painting I (3) 

ART 436 PamtingIV(3) 

ART 497 Senior Project (3) 

Electives (9 units) 

Nine units in studio art (at least 6 of which must be at the 300-400 level) 

Computer Art Option (66 units) 

First Level Foundation (18 units) 

Second Level Foundation (18 units) 

ART 217 Introduction to Computer Media (3) 

ART 229 Painting 1 (3) 

ART 234 Photography 1(3) 

ART 329 Painting II (3) 

ART 2xx Any 200-level Sculpture Course (3) 

or 
ART 2xx/3xx Any 200-300-level Crafts Course (3) 
ARTH 3xx/4xx Any 300-400-level Art History Course (3) 

Rei|uired Courses (21 units) 

ART 324 Modern Art II (3) 

ART 360 Computer Art I (3) 

ART 3xx/4xx Any 300-400-level Drawing Course (3) 

ART 346 New Directions in Painting I (3) 

ART 460 Computer Art II (3) 

ART 462 Computer Art III (3) 

ART 497 Senior Project (3) 



«ra 



The College of Fine Arts and Communication 



Electives (9 units from the following) 

ART 321 Computer Graphics I (3) 

ART 336 Painting III (3) 

ART 345 New Directions in Printmaking (3) 

ART 361 Computer 3-D Modeling (3) 

ART 363 Computer Multimedia 1(3) 

ART 446 New Directions in Painting II (3) 

PRE^JTMAKING CONCENTRATION (66 units) 

First Level Foundation (18 units) 



Second Level Foundation (18 units) 
ART 205 
ART 229 
ART 241 



The Human Figure (3) 

Painting I (3) 

Sculpture I (3) 

or 
ART 2xx/3xx Any 200-300-level Crafts Course (3) 
ART 245 Introduction to Prmtmaking (3) 

ART 234 Photo I (3) 

ARTH 324 Modern Art II (3) 

Required Courses (24 units) 

ART 3xx/4xx Any Four Printmaking Courses (12) 

ART 329 Paintmgll(3) 

ART 402 Life Drawing and Anatomy I (3) 

ART 497 Senior Project (3) 

ARTH 3xx/4xx Any 300-400-level Art History Course (3) 

Electives (6 units) 

ART 217 Introduction to Computer Media (3) 

ART 412 Life Drawing and Anatomy II (3) 

ART 334 Photography II (3) 

ART 346 New Directions in Painting I (3) 

ART 359 Digital Photography 1(3) 

ART 373 Illustration I (3) 

ART 3xx/4xx One 300-400-level Studio Course (3)+ 

SCULPTURE CONCENTRATION (66 units) 

First Level Foundation (18 units) 

Second Level Foundation (18 units) 

ART 205 

ART 217 

ART 229 

ART 241 

ARTH 323 

ARTH 324 

Required Courses 
ART 361 
ART 441 
ART 443 
ART 445 
ART 497 



The Human Figure (3) 
Introduction to Computer Media (3) 
Painting I (3) 
Sculpture I (3) 
Modern Art I (3) 
Modern Art II (3) 

(15 units) 

Computer 3-D Modeling (3) 
Advanced Sculpture II (3) 
Advanced Sculpture III (3) 
Expcrmiental Directions (3) 
Senior Project (3) 



Electives (15 units from the following) 

ART 311 Wood: Concept and Process (3) 

ART 318 Jewelry I (3) 

ART 339 Metal: Concept and Process (3) 

ART 340 Modeling: (Concept and Process (3) 

ART 342 Carving: Concept and Process (3) 

ART 407 Ceramics: Clay Sculpture (3) 

VISUAL COMMUNICATION CONCENTRATION 

Students may select one of five program options within the Visual 
Communication Concentration: 1) Graphic Design Screened 
Option, 2) Illustration: Studio Media Option, 3) Illustration: 
Digital Option, 4) Photography: Fine and Applied Arts Option, or 
5) Photography: Photographic Imaging Interdisciplinary Option. 



Graphic Design: Screened Option (72 units) 

Student prerequisites and procedures for Graphic Design screening: 

1. AGPAof 2.67 overall. 

2. The following courses must be completed by the end of the 
term in which the student applies to the Graphic Design 
Option: ART 103, ART 104, ART 111, ART 21 1, ART 217, 
ART 229, ARTH 221, ARTH 222. Students must complete 
these courses, or equivalent transferred courses before taking 
further courses in the Graphic Design Option. 

3. A grade lower than B- (2.67) in any studio art course will elim- 
inate the student from consideration for the Graphic Design 
Option. 

4. Declared Art majors may apply to the Graphic Design Option 
at the end of their third term of study. At the time of applica- 
tion, a minimum of 45 units must have been completed, 
including courses from that term. Students may apply who 
have earned an A. A. degree in a related major. 

5. To be considered in the screening process, students must sub- 
mit the following by the last day of finals in a given term: an 
official transcript, a Graphic Design Screening Form and a 
sealed 18"x 24" portfolio. The portfolio must include two 
pieces of work from ART 103, ART 211, ART 217 and ART 
229 (a total of eight pieces). Students who do not submit a 
portfolio or submit an incomplete portfolio will not be con- 
sidered for the Graphic Design Option at that time. Late appli- 
cations will not be considered. Students with an overall GPA 
of 3.50 or greater, having completed other prerequisites, and 
having completed a minimum of 45 units at Towson 
University, are accepted on confirmation of their overall GPA 
and do not need to submit portfolios. 

6. Students not accepted may reapply twice. 

If the student's GPA falls below a 3.00 in the ma|or or 2.67 
overall, the student may have a probationary term to get the 
major GPA to 3.00 and GPA to 2.67 overall. 

First Level Foundation (18 units) 

Second Level Foundation (18 units) 



ART 217 


Introduction to Computer Media (3) 


ART 229 


Painting 1 (3) 


ART 234 


Photography 1(3) 


ART 241 


Sculpture I (3) 


ART 231 


or 

Ceramics I (3) 


ART 318 


or 

Jewelry I (3) 


ART 377 


Exhibit Design (3) 


ARTH 324 


.Modern Art II (3) 


Required Courses (36 units) 


ART 317 


Graphic Design I (3) 


ART 355 


Typography (3) 


ART 321 


Computer Graphics I (3) 


ARTH 327 


History of Modern Design (3) 


ART 334 


Photography 11 (3) 


ART 335 


or 

Photography HI (3) 


ART 373 


Illustration 1 (3) 


ART 417 


Graphic Design II (3) 


ART 421 


Computer Graphics II (3) 


ART 473 


Illustration 11 (31 


ART 457 


Graphic Design 111 (3) 


ART 483 


Package Design (3) 


ART 368 


or 

Industrial Design (3) 


ART 363 


or 

Computer Multimedia I (3) 


ART 497 


Senior Project (3) 



Department of Art 



illustration: Studio Media Option (69 units) 
First Level Foundation (18 units) 
Second Level Foundation (18 units) 



ART 205 



The Human Figure (3) 



ART 217 


Introduction to Computer Media (3) 


ART 229 


Painting 1 (3) 


ART 329 


Painting 11 (3) 


ART 241 


Sculpture I (3) 


ART 2xx/3x.\ 


or 

Any 200-300-level Crafts Course (3) 


ARTH 324 


Modern Art II (3) 


Required Courses (21 units) 


ARTH 3xx/4xx 


Any 300-400-level An History Course (3) 


ART 317 


Graphic Design I (3) 


ART 373 


Illustration 1 (3) 


ART 402 


Life Drawing and Anatomy I (3) 


ART 473 


Illustration II (3) 


ART 474 


Illustration III (3) 


ART 497 


Senior Projea (3) 


Electives (12 units) 


ART 336 


Painting III (3) 


ART XXX 


Any Watercolor Course (3) 


ART XXX 


Any Printmaking Course (3) 


ART 412 


Life Drawing (3) 


ART 3xx/4xx 


Any 300- or 400-level Studio Course (6) 



Illustration: Digital Option (69 units) 
First Level Foundation (18 units) 
Second Level Foundation (18 units) 



ART 205 


The Human Figure (3) 


ART 217 


Introduction to Computer Media (3) 


ART 229 


Painting I (3) 


ART 329 


Painting II (3) 


ART 241 


Sculpture I (3) 


ART 2xx/3xx 


OT 

Any 200-300-level Crafts Course (3) 


ARTH 324 


Modern Art II (3) 


Required Courses (21 units) 


ART 317 


Graphic Design I (3) 


ART 373 


Illustration I (3) 


ART 402 


Life Drawing and Anatomy 1(3) 


ART 473 


Illustration II (3) 


ART 474 


Illustration III (3) 


ART 497 


Senior Project (3) 


ARTH 3xx/4xx 


Any 300-400-level Art History Course (3) 



Electives (12 units) 

ART 321 Computer Graphics I (3) 

ART 360 Computer Art I (3) 

ART 460 Computer Art II (3) 

ART 3xx/4xx Any 300- or 400-level Studio Course (61 

Photography: Fine and Applied Arts Option (66 units) 

First Level Foundation (18 units) 

Second Level Foundation (18 units) 

ART 217 Introduction to Computer Media (3) 

ART 229 Painting I (3) 

ART 234 Photography I (3) 

ART 241 Sculpture I (3) 

or 
ART 2xx/3xx Any 200-300-level Crafts Course (3) 
ARTH 3xx Any 300-level Art History Course (3) 

ARTH 35 1 History of Photography (3) 



Required Courses (21 units) 

ART 334 Photography II (3) 

ART 335 Photography III (3) 

ART 359 Digital Photography I (3) 

ART 357 Photographic Formats (3) 

ART 435 Photography IV (3) 

ART 459 Digital Photography II (3) 

ART 497 Senior Project (3) 

Electives 

9 units in studio art (6 of which must be 300-400-level) 

Photography: Photographic Imaging Interdisciplinary Option 
(69 units) 

First Level Foundation (18 units) 

Second Level Foundation (18 units) 

ART 217 Introduction to Computer Media (3) 

ART 234 Photography I (3) 

ARTH 351 History of Photography (3) 

EMF267 Film Making I (3) 

EMF 271 Television Production I (3) 

THEA 225 Lighting Design I (3) 

Required Courses (24 units) 
ART 334 Photography II (3) 

ART 335 Photography III (3) 

ART 359 Digital Photography I (3) 

ART 357 Photographic Formats (3) 

ART 459 Digital Photography II (3) 

ART 436 Photography IV (3) 

ART 497 Senior Project (3) 

EMF 363 History of Film (3) 

or 
EMF 364 Aesthetics of Film (3) 



Electives (9 units) 

9 units in studio art, mass communication, electronic media and film, the- 
atre (6 of which must be 300-400-level) 

MINOR IN ART (24 units) 

Students who wish to complete a minor in Art should consult with 
their departmental adviser. Students may choose either the Studio 
or Art History program option. 

Studio Option (24 units) 

Required Courses (24 units) 
ART 103 Design I (3) 



104 


Design II (3) 


111 


Drawing I (3) 


229 


Painting I (3) 


241 


Sculpture I (3) 


H221 


Survey of Western Art I (3) 


H222 


Survey of Western Art II (3) 


xxx 


Elective (3) 



Art History Option (24 units) 

Required Courses (12 units) 
ARTH 221 Survey of Western Art I (3) 

ARTH 222 Survey of Western Art II (3) 

ARTH 391 Research Methods in Art History (3) 

ARTH 485 Seminar in Art History (3) 

12 units from the following: 

ARTH 301 Origins of Western Art (3) 

ARTH 306 Art and Architecture of the Classical World (3) 

ARTH 307 Medieval Art (3) 

ARTH 309 Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture (3) 

ARTH 311 Northern Renaissance Art and Architecture (3) 

ARTH 313 Baroque Art and Architecture (3) 



100 



The College of Fine Arts and Communication 



ARTH 323 


Modern Art I (3) 




ARTH 324 


Modern Art II |3| 




ARTH 325 


History of Modern Architecture 


(3) 


ARTH 327 


History of Modern Design (3) 




ARTH 328 


Art, Culture and Politics (3) 




ARTH 331 


Art of China (3) 




ARTH 353 


Art of Japan (3) 




ARTH 335 


African-American Art (3) 




ARTH 337 


Art and Architecture of the U.S. 


1(3) 


ARTH 338 


Art and Architecture of the U.S. 


11(3) 


ARTH 339 


Latin American Art (3) 




ARTH 341 


Women in Art (3) 




ARTH 351 


History of Photography (3) 




ARTH 370-379 


Special Topics (3) 




ARTH 485 


Seminar in Art History (3) 




ARTH 494 


Study Abroad (3-9) 





ART HISTORY CONCENTRATION 

Students may select one of two program options in Art History: 1) 
Research or 2) Research/Studio. 

Research Option 

This option is for those students who want to work in the curato- 
rial, educational, public relations or registration areas of a muse- 
um or gallery or who wish to go on to graduate school in the art 
history field. This program option has no studio requirements. 

To complete the research option, students must take a total of 
45 upper-division units. Of the 45 upper-division units, a mini- 
mum of 27 units, but not more than 36 must be taken in art his- 
tory. If students choose to take the minimum 27 units, the differ- 
ence between the 27 minimum and the 36 maximum must be taken 
in allied disciplines such as Anthropology, English, History, and 
Philosophy, subject to the approval of the faculty advisor. The 
remaining units to reach the 45 upper-division total are elective, 
but they must also be taken in academic disciplines related to the 
student's interests in art history. Once the 45 upper division 
requirements have been fulfilled as described above, students may 
take additional elective art history courses. 

Required Courses (12 units) 

ARTH 221 Survevof Western Art 1(3) 

ARTH 222 Survey of Western Art II (3) 

ARTH 391 Research Methods in Art History (3) 

ARTH 485 Seminar in Art History (repeatable) (3) 

Language Requirement 

Two years of either German or French, or their equivalent by 
examination is strongly recommended but not required. 

Multicultural Requirement: (3 units) 

One course from the following: 

ARTH 330 East Asian Art and Architecture (3) 

ARTH 331 The Art of China (3) 

ARTH 333 The Art of Japan (3) 

ARTH 335 African-American Art (3) 

ARTH 339 Latin-American Art (3) 

ARTH 341 Women in Art (3) 

Art History Courses (24-33 units) 

ARTH 301 Origins of Western Art (3) 

ARTH 306 Art and Architecture of the Classical World (3) 

ARTH 307 Medieval Art (3) 

ARTH 309 Italian Renaissance An and Architecture (3) 

ARTH 31 1 Northern Renaissance Art and Architecture (3) 

ARTH 313 Baroque Art and Architecture (3) 

ARTH 323 Modern Art I (3) 

ARTH 324 Modern Art II (3) 

ARTH 325 History of Modern Architecture (3) 

ARTH 327 History of Modern Design (3) 

ARTH 328 Art. Culture and Politics (3) 

ARTH 330 East Asian Art and Architecture (3) 

ARTH 331 Art of China (3) 



ARTH 333 


ARTH 335 


ARTH 337 


ARTH 338 


ARTH 339 


ARTH 341 


ARTH 351 


ARTH 370-379 


ARTH 485 


ARTH 494 


ARTH 495-97 


ARTH 499 



Art of Japan (3) 

African-American Art (3) 

Art and Architecture of the U.S. 1 (3) 

Art and Architecture of the U.S. II (3) 

Latin-American Art (3) 

Women in Art (3) 

History of Photography (3) 

Special Topics (3) 

Seminar in Art History (repeatable) (3) 

Study Abroad (3-9) 

Independent Study in Art History (3-9) 

Senior Honors Thesis (4) 



Research/Studio Option 

This option is for those students who plan to pursue careers in art 
conseration, museum exhibition preparation and exhibition 
design, museum education and gallery work. Students following 
this option must take both studio and advanced art history courses. 

Required Studio Courses (27 units) 

ART 103 Design I (3) 

ART 104 Design II (3) 

ART 1 1 1 Drawing and the Appreciation of Drawing I (3) 

ART 205 The Human Figure (3) 

ART 211 Drawing II (3) 

ART 2xx/3xx Crafts Course (3) 

ART 229 PainnngI (3) 

ART 234 Photography I (3) 

ART 241 Sculpture I (3) 

Required Courses (12 units) 

ARTH 221 Survey of Western Art I (3) 

ARTH 222 Survey of Western Art II (3) 

ARTH 391 Research Methods in Art History (3) 

ARTH 485 Seminar in Art History (repeatable) (3) 

Multicultural Requirement: (3 units) 

One course from the following: 

ARTH 330 East Asian Art and Architecture (3) 

ARTH 331 The Art of China (3) 

ARTH 333 The Art of Japan (3) 

ARTH 335 African-American Art (3) 

ARTH 339 Latin-American Art (3) 

ARTH 341 Women in Art (3) 

Art History Courses (24 units) 

ARTH 301 Origins of Western Art (3) 

ARTH 306 Art and Architecture of the Classical World (3) 

ARTH 307 Medieval Art (3) 

ARTH 309 Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture (3) 

ARTH 31 1 Northern Renaissance Art and Architecture (3) 

ARTH 3 1 3 Baroque Art and Architecture (3) 

ARTH 323 Modern Art I (3) 

ARTH 324 Modern Art II (3) 

ARTH 325 History of Modern Architecture (3) 

ARTH 327 History of Modern Design (3) 

ARTH 328 Art, Culture and Polincs (3) 

ARTH 330 East Asian Art and Architecture (3) 

ARTH 331 Art of China (3) 

ARTH 333 Art of Japan (3) 

ARTH 335 African-American Art (3) 

ARTH 337 Art and Architecture of the U.S. I (3) 

ARTH 338 Art and Architecture of the U.S. II (3) 

ARTH 339 Latin-American Art (3) 

ARTH 341 Women m Art (3) 

ARTH 351 History of Photography (3) 

ARTH 370-379 Special Topics (3) 

ARTH 485 Seminar in Art History (repeatable) (3) 

ARTH 494 Study Abroad (3-9) 

ARTH 495-97 Independent Study in Art History (3-9) 

ARTH 499 Senior Honors Thesis (4) 



Department of Art 



MAJOR IN ART EDUCATION (SCREENED MAJOR) 

Students in the Art Education program receive dual certification 
enabling them to teach art in Maryland in grades K-12. In addition 
to meeting the General Education requirements (45 units), 
students complete art education and professional education 
requirements for 97 units. The entire program is approximately 
142 units and takes five years to complete. The art education block 
is taken in the last three terms of the program. 

Requirements for admission are as follows: 

1. Junior standing 

2. ,\n overall GPA of 2.75 

3. A GPA of 3.00 in the major 

4. An interview and portfolio review with the art education facult)' 

5. Permission of the education department 

To continue within the professional sequences and be eligible to 
student teach, students must fulfill the following requirements: 

1. Receive a grade of B or better in all art education courses 

2. Maintain a 2.75 average in the professional course sequence 

3. Pass the Pra.xis I (reading, writing and math) and the speech 
and hearing tests prior to student teaching 

4. Undergo a criminal background check prior to student teaching 

First Level Foundation (18 units) 

Second Level Foundation (18 units) 

ART 229 Painting I (3) 

ART 234 Photography I (3) 

ART 217 Intro to Computer .Media (3) 

ART 241 Sculpture I (31 

ARTH 3xxy4xx Any 300-400-level Art History Course (6) 

Studio Requirements (12 units) 

ART 231 Ceramics (3) 

ART 2xx-3xx Any 200-300-level Printmaking Course (3) 

ART 2xx-3xx Any 200-300-level Studio Electives (6) 

Art Education Courses (31 units) 

First Term of the Art Education Block (6 units) 

ARED 381 Media and Techniques for Art Teachers: Elementar)- (3) 

ARED 383 Media and Techniques for Art Teachers: Secondary' (3) 

Second Term of the Art Education Block (10 units) 
ARED 467 Field Experience in Art Education: Elementary (2) 

ARED 468 Field Experience in .'\rt Education: Secondary (2) 

ARED 475 Methods of Teaching Art: Elementary (3) 

ARED 479 Methods of Teaching Art: Secondary (3) 

Third Term of the Art Education Block ( 15 units) 
ARED 481 Student Teaching in Art: Elementary (6) 

ARED 483 Student Teaching in .\rt: Secondar\- (6) 

ARED 485 Professional Seminar in the Teaching of Art (3) 

Professional Courses (19 units) 

PSYC 201 Educational Psychology (3) 

SCED 341 Principles of Secondary Education (4) 

SPED 301 Introduction to Special Education (3) 

EDUC 401 Foundations of Education (3) 

plus two of the following: 

ELED 324 Literacy in the K-12 Program (3) 

ARED 463 Author-Illustrator: Elementar)' (3) 

ARED 464 Author-Illustrator: Secondary (3) 

Additional Required Courses (taken as CenEds) 
PSYC 101 
HIST 145 



HIST 146 
CO.M.M 131 



Introduction to Psychology (3) 

U.S. History to the Mid-19th Century (3) 

or 

U.S. History since the Mid-19th Century (3) 

Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 



TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

The Department of Art accepts art credits from other accredited 
colleges and universities. Portfolio evaluation and transfer credit 
sheets form a basis for course evaluation. 

ART DEPARTMENT HONORS PROGRAMS 

The Department of Art grants honors in Art Education, Art 
History and Studio Art. Admission is granted at the end of the 
sophomore or beginning of the junior year to students who have 
the following qualifications: overall cumulative GP.A of 3.25, 
major GPA of 3.25, recommendation by adviser to departmental 
honors coordinator. The minimum requirements for graduation 
with honors in Art are an overall cumulative GPA of 3.25 and 3.50 
in major field and completion of the honors program of study. 

Students accepted into the university honors program may take 
the following: .\RTH 207 Honors: Seminar in An History (repeat- 
able) and ARTH 208 Honors: Seminar in Non-Western Art 
Histor)' (repeatable). 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Towson University's Department of Art has a long tradition of 
preparing students as highly qualified teachers. To prepare stu- 
dents for other careers in art, the department, in conjunction with 
the Career Center, has developed internships with various studios, 
schools, colleges, design firms and museums. These internships 
provide students with the experience necessary for achieving suc- 
cess in their fields, including Web page design, graphic design, 
illustration and advertising. 

STUDENT WORK POLICY 

Material submitted by students to satisfi,' requirements in any 
course automatically becomes the property of the Department of 
Art. This material may be returned to students at the discretion of 
the faculty member. 




102 



The College of Fine Arts and Communication 



Department of Dance 

Associate Professors: Dennis Price (Chair), Jaye Knutson, 

Susan Mann 

Assistant Professors: Catherine Horta-Hayden, Vincent Thomas 

Performance Coordinator: Heather Sorensen 

Lecturer: Nancy Wanich-Romita 

Part-time Faculty: Jayne Bernasconi, Lester Holmes, Dana 
Martin, Stephanie Powell, Paul Shapanus, Heather Sorensen 

Recent Guest Artist Faculty: Anjali Austin, Michael Bjerkness, 
Sheena Black, Leslie Bradley, Suzanne Bryant, Adrienne 
Clancy, Trudy Cobb Dennard, Mindy Cooper-Grenke, Alison 
Crosby, Dianna Cuatto, Kristin Degnan, Linda Denise Fisher- 
Harrell, Alexander Gish, Stephen Greenston, Doug Hamby, 
Sandra Lacey, Naoko Maeshiba, Pene McCourry, Chandra 
Moss, Cathy Paine, Miriam Whiteaker, Helanius Wilkins, 
Kristina Windom 

OFFICE 

Center for the Arts 1002, 410-704-2760 
Fax: 410-704-3752 
www.towson.edu/dance/ 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Dance offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 
Dance Performance. For students who are interested in teaching, 
there is an optional teacher certification program available. Dance 
majors may elect to take courses that will enable them to meet uni- 
versity, college and Maryland teacher certification requirements in 
K-12 education. The department offers courses that fulfill various 
General Education (GenEd) requirements, including (DANC 220 
LB), LD (DANC 321), LE (DANC 235), ILB.l (DANC 127), n.B.3 
(DANC 101, DANC 106), and II.C.l (DANC 123, DANC 125, 
DANC 133). 

The B.F.A. Program promotes excellence in the process of 
becoming a dance professional and/or pursumg graduate studies. 
The experience of moving is the most potent way of understand- 
ing dance in this program. Our dual emphasis in ballet and mod- 
ern dance involves cognitive, affective and physical ways of doing 
and knowing. The curriculum promotes dance as a primary vehi- 
cle for communication and expression that unifies diverse popula- 
tions and has innate cultural value. An active professional faculty 
provides intensive studio, production and theoretical exposure that 
supports dancing for a lifetime. 

Towson University is the only institution of higher education in 
Maryland to offer the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Dance. All 
students major in Dance Performance. Students may elect to add 
the education component. Towson University is an accredited 
institutional charter member of the National Association of 
Schools of Dance. The Dance major program is also accredited by 
the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and 
the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education 
and Certification. 

ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR 

Students must first submit a written application to the Office of 
Admissions. Pending acceptance into the university, students must 
audition for the Dance major. Auditions are held at the beginning 
of each spring term. Prospective majors should contact the depart- 
ment for specific dates and an audition application form. 
The auditions determine the following: 

1. acceptance into the Dance major 

2. technical level for class placement 

3. scholarship awards 

Students may only audition twice for the major. If students are 
accepted into the Dance major and do not attend the following 
fall, they must petition the faculty for later acceptance. 



TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

Students transferring from other institutions must complete a minimum 
of 20 credits of their dance course requirements at Towson 
LIniversity. 

MAJOR IN DANCE PERFORMANCE 

The major in Dance Performance leads to the Bachelor of Fine Arts 
degree. Students in the major must complete 65 units of required 
dance courses, 6 units of required interdisciplinary courses, 15 
units of dance electives, 3 units of other electives, GenEd require- 
ments (DANC 125, DANC 220, DANC 235 and DANC 321: spec- 
ified components of the Dance Performance major), and the per- 
formance requirements outlined below. A grade equivalent of 2.00 
or higher is required for all courses in the major. All majors are 
required to be enrolled in a ballet and modern class each term prior 
to their scheduled jury. 

Requirements for the Major 

Please note: asterisked courses indicate specific General Education 

courses required by the dance department. 

Dance Courses (65 units) 

DANC 125 Introduction to Dance: Overview (3) 

DANC 216 Sophomore Crew (1) 

DANC 220* Using Information Effectively in Dance (3) LB 

DANC 223-4 Level I Ballet (4) (2 per term) 

DANC 227-8 Level I Modern (4) (2 per term) 

DANC 235* Composition I (3) I. E 

DANC 245 Scientific Bases for Movement Analysis I (3) 

DANC 263 Dance Design and Production (3) 

DANC 316 Junior Crew (1) 

DANC 321' Respondmg to Dance (3) I.D 

DANC 323-4 Level II Ballet (6) (3 per term) 

DANC 327-8 Level II Modern (6) (3 per term) 

DANC 335 Composition II (3) 

DANC 336 Composition 111 (3) 

DANC 345 Scientific Bases for Movement Analysis II (3) 

DANC 423-4 Level III Ballet (3) 

DANC 427-8 Level III Modern (3) 

DANC 436 Composition IV: For the Proscenium (3) 

or 

DANC 437 Composition IV: For the Camera (3) 

DANC 480 Senior Project: Seminar (2) 

DANC 491 Senior Proiect: Concert (3) 

Performance majors must take 9 units of Level 111 and must 
include courses in both ballet and modern. Majors in Dance 
Performance K-12 certification must take 6 units of Level III in 
either or both disciplines. 

Interdisciplinary Courses (6 units) 

THEA 101 Acting 1(3) 

MUSC 120 Music Fundamentals for Dance Majors (3) 

Dance Electives (12 units) 

DANC 101 The Alexander Technique (3) 

DANC 105 Movement Skills Enhancement for Men (3) 

DANC 109 Jazz Dance 1(2) 

DANC 209 Jazz Dance II (2) 

DANC 111 Tap Dance 1(2) 

DANC 211 Tap Dance II (2) 

DANC 201 Devclopnient.il .Movement (3) 

DANC 25 1 Methods of re.Khing D.ince (3) 

DANC 310 Jazz Dance III (2) 

DANC 34 1 Pointc Technique I (2) 

DANC 342 Pointc Technique 11 (2) 

DANC 351 Teaching Dance Technique (3) 

DANC 370-379 Special Topics in Dance (1-3) 

DANC 383 Modern Dance Repertory (3) 

DANC 384 Ballet Repertory (3) 

DANC 451 Dance Education and Puhlic Policies (3) 

DANC 481 Dance Company (3) 

DANC 492 Practicum in Dance Technique (variahle) 

DANC 495 Independent Study in Dance (1-3) 

Technique classes taken after completing major requirements. 



Department of Dance 



103 



At least 6 units of electives must be in Modern Repertory, Ballet 
Repertory or Dance Company. 

Other Eleaives (3 units) 

Performance Requirements for Majors 

To fulfill performance requirements for graduation. Dance majors 
must audition for the TL' Dance Company a minimum of two 
times during their tenure at Tovvson and must fulfill one of the fol- 
lowing: 

1. Perform with the TU Dance Company (3 units — audition 
required) or Ballet or Modern Repertory (3 units each) for a 
minimum total of 6 units, and 9 additional units of works in sec- 
tions of Dance Composition III and IV for a total of 15 per- 
formance units. 
or 
1. Transfer students must consult with the chairperson of the 
Department of Dance to arrange equivalent performing 
experiences. 

juries 

As a mechanism for assessing progress toward the degree, all 
Dance majors will be evaluated by a jury of faculty members at the 
end of the spring term of the sophomore year The jury will con- 
sider a video portfolio of selections from the audition, movement 
exams and performances of each student. In addition, each student 
will perform a combination of movement material at the time of 
the jury meeting. Written and verbal assessment will be given to 
each student in relation to the expected student outcomes of the 
program. Should the jury find a student to be in difficulty from a 
technical or academic standpoint, he or she may be placed on pro- 
bation or advised to consider an alternative program of study. 
Special note: All majors are required to be enrolled in a ballet and 
modern class each term prior to their scheduled jury. 

Crews 

All Dance majors are required to register for and complete both a 
Sophomore Crew (DANC 216) and Junior Crew (DANC 316). 
These assignments are made annually by the department. 
Successful completion of each crew course is a requirement prior to 
registering for DANC 480 and for graduation with the B.F.A. 
degree in Dance Performance or the B.F.A. degree in Dance 
Performance with K-12 Certification in Dance Education. 

MAJOR IN DANCE PERFORMANCE WITH K-12 
CERTmCATION OPTION 

Dance majors may elect to obtain State Teacher Certification to 
teach dance at the elementary and secondary levels. Students in 
'this program receive certification to teach dance in grades K-12 in 
the public schools in Maryland and reciprocal states. The program 
leads to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Dance Performance and 
K-12 Certification in Dance Education. 

Admission to the K-12 Certification Option and student teaching 
requires: 1) admission to the university; 2) admission to the major; 
3) a personal interview; 4) completion of a Criminal Background 
Disclosure Form that must be notarized and kept on file in the 
Center for Professional Practice (CPP); 5) completion of a crimi- 
nal background check that must be kept on file in the CPP before 
the student enters into an intensive/extensive internship or student 
teaching experience in a public or private school setting (pre-K 
through 12); 6) passing score on the Praxis I examination, and 7) 
successful completion of the speech and hearing test. All seven 
items listed above are prerequisites for the internship application. 
Continuance in the program requires the maintenance of an over- 
all GPA of 2.50 and a GPA of 2.75 in major classes each term, the 



maintenance of a current membership in the National Dance 
Education Organization, and maintenance of behaviors and atti- 
tudes set forth by Towson University's Conceptual Framework for 
Professional Education. 

Students whose GPA falls below the minimum requirement will 
automatically be placed on departmental probation and given one 
term to improve their GPA. Failure to do so may result in suspen- 
sion from the program. 

The Teacher Education Executive Board (TEEB) reserves the 
right to refuse, deny or revoke the application for admission to pro- 
fessional education programs or entry- into student teaching of any 
student whose observed conduct is deemed incongruent with estab- 
lished guidelines of student demeanor for those planning to enter 
the teaching profession as excerpted from the "Statement of 
Professional Behavior for Undergraduate and Graduate Teacher 
Education Students," in the Towson State Universitv Compass 
(1987 Student Handbook), and "NEA Code of Ethics" (1975), 
adopted by the College of Education Council in September 1988, 
and reaffirmed by TEEB in November 1990, October 1995, 
February 1996 and February 2000, 

Students must complete the required Dance and Interdisciplinary 
courses set forth for the major, the Performance Requirements for 
Majors listed below, jury and crew requirements, and an addition- 
al ii units of professional education components listed below. 
Students must also be placed by the faculty in both Level III 
Modern and Level HI Ballet. 

DANC 201 Developmental Movement (3) 

DANC 251 Methods of Teaching Dance (3) 

DANC 391 Student Teaching in Elementary School (6) 

DANC 392 Student Teaching in Secondary School (6) 

DANC 451 Dance Education and Public Policies (3) 

PHEC 183 Ballroom/Folk/Square Dancing ( 1 ) 

PSYC 201 Educational Psychology (3) 

ELED 324 Integrated Reading K-12 Certification (3) 

EDUC 401 Foundations of Education (3) 

SPED 301 Introducnon to Special Education K-12 (3) 

DANC 493 Pro-Seminar in the Teaching of Dance ( 1 ) 

(to be taken concurrently with DANC 391 and DANC 392) 

Performance Requirements for Majors 

To fulfill performance requirements for graduation, K-12 

Certification Dance majors who choose the Education Certification 

Option must audition for the TU Dance Company a minimum of 

two times during their tenure at Towson and must fulfill one of the 

following: 

1. Perform with the TU Dance Company (3 units — audition 
required) or Ballet or Modern Repertory (3 units each) for a 
minimum total of 3 units, and 12 additional units of works in 
sections of Dance Composition HI and IV for a total of 15 per- 
formance units. 

or 

2. Transfer students must consult with the chairperson of the 
department to arrange equivalent performing experiences. 

Post-baccalaureate Certification Option 

For students who have completed a bachelor's degree in dance, the 
Department of Dance offers a post-baccalaureate program leading 
to Maryland K-12 certification in dance. Prospective students 
interested in this option need to contact the department to set up 
an appointment with the program coordinator to have their tran- 
script(s) analyzed and a program of study developed based upon 
state certification and departmental requirements. 



104 



The College of Fine Arts and Communication 



SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR DANCE 
PERFORMANCE AND EDUCATION PROGRAM 



Writing for a Liberal Education (3) 
Dance Design and Production (3) 
Introduction to Psychology (3) 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Term (16 units) 

ENGL 102 

DANC 263 

PSYC 101 

GenEdH.C.l (3) 

Ballet (determined by placement) (2) 

Modern Dance (determined by placement) (2) 

Second Term (17 units) 

DANC 245 Scientific Basis for Movement I (3) 

PSYC 201 Educational Psychology (3) 

HIST 145 History of tlie U.S. to the Mid-19th Century (3) 

or 
HIST 146 History of the U.S. since the Mid-19th Century (3) 

GenEd II.A.l Lab Science (4) 
Ballet (determined by placement) (2) 
Modern Dance (determined by placement) (2) 

'^ Additional requirements during the freshman year: Dub ballet 
and modern combinations and solo frotti audition to personal 
video portfolio; join NDEO. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First Term (18 units) 

DANC 345 Scientific Basis for Movement II (3) 

DANC 220 Using Information Effectively in Dance ^^) GenEd 

I.B 

Introduction to Special Education K-12 (3) 



SPED 301 

GenEd ILD (3) 

Ballet (determined by placement) (3) 

Modern Dance (determined by placement 



(3) 



Second Term (17 units) 

DANC 201 Developmental Movement (3) 

DANC 235 Dance Composition I (3) 

ELED 324 Integrated Reading K-12 Certification (3) 

MUSC 107 Music for Dance (3) 

Ballet (determined by placement) (3) 

Modern Dance (determined by placement) (3) 

'Additional requirements during the sophomore year: Register for 
Sophomore Crew (DANC 215); dub practicums and jury informa- 
tion for sophomore jury in March/April. 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First Term (16 units) 

DANC 335 Dance Composition 11 (3) 

DANC 321 History of the Dance (3) GenEd I.D. 

PHEC 1 83 Ballroom/Folk/Stiuare Dancmg ( 1 ) 

GenEd l.C (3) 

GenEd II.B.2 (3) 

Ballet/Modern (determined by placement) (3| 

Second Term (18 units) 

DANC 336 Dance Composition III (3| 

THEA 101 Acting 1(3) 

COMM 131 Fundamentals of Speech t'ommunication (3) 

GenEd II.A.l Lab Science (4) 

GenEd II.C.3 (3) 

Tap/Jazz (determined by placement) (2) 

'Additional requirements during the junior year: register for 
junior Crew (DANC .US); Praxis. 



SENIOR YEAR 

First Term (14 units) 

DANC 251 Methods of Teaching Dance (3) 

DANC 436 Dance Composition IV (3) 

DANC 480 Senior Proiect: Seminar (2) 

Ballet/Modern (determined by placement) (3) 

Dance Company (3) 

Second Term (14 units) 

DANC 451 Dance Education and Public Policies (3) 

DANC 491 Senior Project: Concert/Lecture Demonstration (3) 

EDUC 401 Foundations of Education (3) 

Tap/Jazz (determined by placement) (2) 

Elective (3) 

"Additional requirements during the senior year: register for grad- 
uation; apply for student teaching in the Center for Professional 
Practice. 

Third Term (13 units) 

DANC 391 Student Teaching in Elementary School (6) 
DANC 392 Student Teaching in Secondary School (6) 
DANC 493 Pro-Seminar in the Teaching of Dance ( 1 ) 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

To qualify for a dance recruitment scholarship, or for a COFAC 

Dean's scholarship, students must audition, be accepted into the 

inajor, and be full-time Dance majors. 

The terms/criteria for automatic renewal of Dance Recruitment 

and COFAC Dean's scholarships offered to Dance majors at 

Towson University are as follows: 

l)An overall GPA of 2.75 and a GPA of 3.00 in the major. 
Students whose GPA falls below this minimum requirement 
will automatically lose all scholarship awards. Once students 
have re-established an overall GPA of 2.75 and a GPA of 3.00 
in the major, the remainder of their scholarships from that 
date forward to graduation will be reinstated. 

2) Perform a minimum of once per year and be registered in 
DANC 481, The Towson University Dance Company. 

3) Demonstrate and exemplify a behavioral understanding of the 
relationship between rights and responsibilities within the 
classroom, rehearsal, and all other aspects of the profession - 
as outlined in the Professional Standards section of the 
Towson University Department of Dance Student Handbook. 

4) Participate fully in all aspects of the major. 

5) Annual scholarship renewal evaluation by the Department of 
Dance faculty. 



Department of Electronic Media and Film 



105 



Department of Electronic Media 
and Film 



Professors: Greg Faller, Peter Lev 

Associate Professors: John MacKerron, Barry Moore {Chair), 
John Turner 

Assistant Professors: Gordon Glover, Daniel Mydlack 

Lecturers: Jennifer Lackey, Keith Tishken 

Part-time Faculty: James Armstrong, John Davlin, Eli Eisenberg, 
Gary Harner, G. T. Kephnger, Arthur Laupus, John Spivey, 
Keith W. Strandberg, Jackson Whitt, Paul Wise, Gary Wheeler 

Staff: William McLean, John Spivey, Gus Vigna 

Administrative Assistant: Yvonne Eder 

OFFICE 

Media Center 103, 410-704-3184 
Fax: 410-704-3337 
www.towson.edu/emf 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Electronic Media and Film major focuses upon the study of the 
aesthetics and production of film, television and radio. The major 
is divided into four tracks in TelevisionA'ideo, Film, Radio/Audio, 
and Film and Media Studies. Within the tracks, students are 
encouraged to develop skills in writing, media history and criti- 
cism, and professional media production. 

The Electronic Media and Film major is an undergraduate degree 
program leading either to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 
Science degree. 

The Department of Electronic Media and Film is committed to 
the liberal arts and professional education. Students are encouraged 
to develop and refine visual, written and technical skills and to cul- 
tivate critical thinking abilities in all courses. The program is 
designed to prepare students for careers in electronic media and 
film as well as to prepare them for graduate study in related fields. 

Students selecting the major should contact the department to be 
assigned an adviser to assist them in designing a program to meet 
their special needs. Students will meet with their adviser each term 
to discuss their progress and to facilitate necessary changes in their 
course of study. 

Screening Requirements 

• Students should file a Declaration of Major Form with the 
department and list themselves as a pre-EMF major (PEMF). 

• There are two tiers of screening: 

1. All students, before being considered for admission to the major, 
must attain a 3.00 GPA in the following three courses: 
EMF 140 Introduction to Electronic Media 
EMF 221 Principles of Film and Media Production 
And one course chosen from the following: (Students should 

choose the screening course that most closely fits their preferred 

EMF track). No more than one of the screening courses can be 

repeated for eligibility. 
EMF 267 Filmmaking I: Basic 16mm Production 
EMF 265 Audio I 

EMF 271 Television I Studio Production 
EMF 364 Aesthetics of Film and Electronic Media 
Transfer students may complete the equivalent courses at their 

previous college or university, but they must attain the overall 3.00 

GPA in the equivalent courses. 



2. Students who have completed the required screening courses 
with a 3.00 GPA must complete and submit a Declaration of 
Eligibility Form in the EMF office to become part of the student 
major pool. Successful completion of the EMF screening courses 
does not guarantee admission to the EMF major. Admission to 
the EMF major is competitive and is determined by the satisfac- 
tory completion of the screening courses, the cumulative GPA, 
and consideration of a submitted creative essay. This policy will 
apply to native and transfer students. 

3. Admission to the EMF major is based on: 

• The number of majors that the department can reasonably 
accept without compromising the quality of its educational expe- 
rience. 

• The satisfactory completion of the screening courses, the stu- 
dent's cumulative GPA, and submitted creative essay. The candi- 
dates with the highest ranking GPA from the pool of applicants 
Will be selected, but no fewer than 75 students will be admitted 
to the EMF major. For transfer students, the cumulative GPA 
will be calculated using grades from all colleges and universities 
attended. All transfer students will be required to submit a cre- 
ative essay. 

• Creative Essay: As part of the screening process, you will be 
required to write a creative essay. Please tell us why you want to 
pursue a course of study in Electronic Media and Film. How 
have your life experiences, creative interests and professional 
goals influenced your choice of this major? 

Compose and attach on separate pages the essay (no more 
than 500 words or approximately two pages double spaced, 
printed with 12-point font). The Screening Committee will use 
your essay to determine your ability to organize your thoughts 
and express yourself clearly. The faculty panel evaluates applica- 
tions for originality, clarity, personal insight and creativity. The 
essay will be used to make decisions in cases where the appli- 
cant's cumulative GPA is marginal. In such cases, it will be used 
to provide an additional means of evaluation for those who 
might not otherwise be admitted to the major. This policy is in 
effect for students entering Towson University as of July 1, 2004. 

Graduation Requirements 

All major requirements must be completed with a grade equivalent 
of 2.00 or higher. The Pass grading option is not available for 
courses applicable toward the major. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Option 

Students may earn a Bachelor of Arts degree in Electronic Media 
and Film by completing the intermediate (200) level of a foreign 
language. 

MAJOR IN ELECTRONIC MEDL\ AND FILM 

The Electronic Media and Film major requires the student to 
choose a track, after taking two introductory courses. The 
Electronic Media and Film major requires 42-45 units. Twenty-one 
units must be upper-division courses. Students cannot have more 
than one track in the EMF major. Depending upon the track, the 
major requires nine units of common introductory courses and 33- 
36 units of courses distributed between required courses and elec- 
tives. 

Students are reminded that it is their responsibility to check all 
prerequisites before registering for any course. 

Required Core Courses for All Majors (9 units): 

EMF 100 Using Information Effectively in Electronic Media and 

Film 
EMF 140 Introduction to Electronic Media (3) 

EMF 221 Principles of Film and Media Production (3) 



106 



The College of Fine Arts and Communication 



Upon completion of the required core, students must fulfill the 
requirements in one of the four tracks outlined below: 

FILM TRACK (36 units) 

Requirements (18 units) 

EMF265 Audio Production I (3) 

EMF 267 Filmmaking I: Basic 16mm Production (3) 

EMF 275 Principles of Film and Video Editing (3) 

EMF 363 History of Film (3)*' 

EMF 367 Filmmaking II: Sync Sound 16mm Techniques (3) 

EMF 377 Broadcast/Film Writing (3)'' " 

Production Electives (6 units) 

Choose 3 units from the following: 

EMF 430 The Media Producer (3) 

EMF 455 Directing for Film and Video (3) 

EMF 487 Semmar in Digital Post Production (3) 

Choose 3 units from the following: 

EMF 361 Documentary Film and Video (3) 

EMF 362 Experimental Film and Video (3) 

EMF 473 Filmmaking III: Advanced 16mm Techniques (3) 

EMF 486 Dance for the Camera (3) 

Media Electives (12 units) 

Choose 6 units from the following courses. Those courses not already used 

in the production electives may be included. 

EMF 364 Aesthetics of Film and Electronic Media (3) 

EMF 368 Genre Theory and Criticism (3) 

EMF 405 Screenwriting (3) 

EMF 460 Internship in Electronic Media and Film (1-6) 

EMF 475 Film Analysis (3) 

EMF 478 Special Tapics in Electronic Media and Film (3) 

EMF 495 Independent Study in Electronic Media and Film (1-6) 

Choose 6 additional units in electronic media and film courses. 

RADIO/AUDIO TRACK (33 units) 

Requirements (15 units) 

EMF 265 Audio Production I (3) 

EMF 311 History of Electronic Media (3) 

EMF 365 Audio Production II (3) 

EMF 375 Broadcast Performance (3) 

EMF 377 Broadcast/Film Writing (3)*» 

Electives (18 units) 

Choose 18 units from the following courses and any other EMF course; at 

least 9 units must be upper division and at least 9 units must be EMF: 

EMF 331 Broadcast/Cable Programming (3) 

EMF 355 Electronic Media and Film Law and Regulation (3) 

EMF 360 Audio Documentary (3) 

EMF 403 Sportscasting (3) 

EMF 421 Radio Stations Operations (3) 

EMF 460 Internship in Electronic Media and Film (1-6) 

EMF 476 Special Topics in Electronic Media and Film (3) 

EMF 495 Independent Study in Electronic Media and Film (1-6) 

MCOM 381 Broadcast Journalism (3) 

MCOM 407 Writing for New Media (3) 

MCOM 433 Media Ethics (3) 

MCOM 440 Advertising Media Sales (3) 

TELEVISIONA^IDEO TRACK (33 units) 

Requirements (18 units) 

EMF 265 Audio Production I (3) 

EMF 271 Television Studio Production (3) 

EMF 275 Principles of Film and Video Editing (3) 

EMF 311 Fllstory of Electronic Media (3) 

EMF 373 Electronic Field Production (3) 

EMF 377 Broadcast/Film Writing (3)** 



Electives (15 units) 

Choose 3 units from the following: 

EMF 361 Documentary Film and Video (3) 

EMF 362 Experimental Film and Video (3) 

EMF 387 Corporate Video (3) 

EMF 435 Remote Video Production (3) 

EMF 471 Producing for Television (3) 

EMF 486 Dance for the Camera (3) 

Choose 12 units from the following courses and any other EMF courses; at 

least 9 units must be upper division. 

COMM 304 Persuasion (3) 

EMF 331 Broadcast/Cable Programming (3) 

EMF 355 Electronic Media and Film Law and Regulation (3) 

EMF 375 Broadcast Performance (3) 

EMF 379 Seminar in Television (3) 

EMF 430 The Media Producer (3) 

EMF 455 Directing for Film and Video (3) 

EMF 460 Internship in Electronic Media and Film (1-6) 

EMF 476 Special Topics In Electronic Media and Film (3) 

EMF 481 Television Journalism (3) 

EMF 495 Independent Study in Electronic Media and Film (1-6) 

MCOM 381 Broadcast Journalism (3) 

FILM AND MEDL\ STUDIES TRACK (33 units) 

Requirements (9 units) 

EMF 311 History of Electronic Media (3) 

EMF 363 History of Film (3)" 

EMF 364 Aesthetics of Film and Electronic Media (3) 

Electives (6 units) 

Choose 6 units from the following: 

EMF 368 Genre Theory and Criticism (3) 

EMF 379 Seminar in Television (3) 

EMF 475 Film Analysis (3) 

Production Requirement (3 units) 

Choose one course from the following: 

EMF 265 Radio/Audio Production I (3) 

EMF 267 Filmmaking I: Basic 16mm Techniques (3) 

EMF 271 Television Studio Production (3) 

EMF 373 Electronic Field Production (3) 

Electives (15 units) 

Choose 9 units from the following, 6 units of which must be upper division. 
Options not taken In Film and Media Studies electives and production 
requirements (above) may also be taken. 

COMM 379 Intercultural Communication (3) 

EMF 205 Women and Gender in Film (3) 

EMF 355 Electronic Media and Film Law and Regulation (3) 

EMF 377 Broadcast/Film Writing (3)** 

EMF 485 Seminar In Digital Studies (3) 

MCOM 352 Media Criticism (3) 

MCOM 385 Mass Media and Society (3) 

MCOM 433 Media Ethics (3) 

Choose 6 additional units In Electronic Media and Film courses. 

'No more than 6 units of independent study and/or internships can 
be applied to the Electronic Media and Film major. 
** This course fulfills the GenEd requirement of category I.D — 
Advanced Composition. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

The department participates In the honors program and sponsors 
departmental honors where students pursue independent study 
leading to the completion of a thesis. Students interested in depart- 
mental honors should consult the chair of the department no later 
than the first term of their |unior year. Honors are designated on 
the graduate's transcript and diploma. 



I 



Department of Electronic Media and Film 



107 



TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

Transfer students are required to complete 21 units in residence 
toward the Electronic Media and Film major. The department will 
accept up to 15 credits of compatible transfer courses. 

MINOR IN ELECTRONIC MEDIA AND FILM 

The Electronic Media and Film minor requires a total of 24 units, 
6 units in approved introductory courses, 3 units in media writing, 
3 units in production and 12 units in selected elective courses. 
Nine of these units must be upper division. 

Core Requirements (6 units) 

EMF 140 Introduction to Electronic Media (3) 

EMF 221 Principles of Film and Media Production (3) 

Writing Requirement (3 units) 

Choose one from following: 

EMF 3 1 1 History of Electronic Media (3) 

EMF 363 Historvof Film (3) " 

EMF 377 Broadcast/Film Writing (3) " 

Production Requirements (3 units) 

Choose one from the following: 

EMF 265 Radio/Audio Production I (3) 

EMF 267 Filmmaking 1: Basic 16mm Production (3) 

EMF 271 Television Studio Production (3) 

Electives (12 units) 

Choose 12 units from the following, plus any courses not taken in 

the requirements listed above. 

EMF 331 

EMF 355 

EMF 364 

E.MF 368 

EMF 375 

EMF 379 

EMF 430 

EMF 460 

EMF 475 

EMF 495 



Broadcast/Cable Programming (3) 

Electronic Media and Film Law and Regulation (3) 

Aesthetics of Film and Electronic iMedia (3) 

Genre Theory and Criticism (3) 

Broadcast Performance (3) 

Seminar in Television (3) 

The Media Producer (3) 

Internship in Electronic Media and Film (1-6) 

Film Analysis (3) 

Independent Study in Electronic Media and Film (1-6) 



1) The Pass grading option is not available for these courses. 
2)'' No more than 3 units of independent study/internships can be 
applied to the Electronic Media and Film minor. 

3) The department will transfer into the minor up to 9 units of 
compatible courses. 

4) Students who wish to minor in Electronic Media and Film and 
major in either Mass Communication or Communication 
Studies may apply up to 6 units simultaneously for satisfaction 
of major and minor. 

5)**This course fulfills the GenEd requirement of category LD — 
Advanced Composition. 



CERTIFICATE IN BROADCAST JOURNALISM 

Students completing the Electronic Media and Film major in the 
Radio/Audio or Television/Video Track are eligible for a depart- 
mental Certificate in Broadcast Journalism if they complete the fol- 
lowing five courses as specified below: 



MCOM 255 
MCOM 358 
MCOM 381 
MCOM 407 

MCOM 356 

MCOM 383 



Newswnting (3) 

News Editing (3) 

Broadcast Journalism (3) 

Writing for New Media (3) 

and 

Feature Writing (3) 

or 

News Reporting (3) 



Students must earn a grade equivalent of 3.00 or higher in each of 
the above courses to receive the certificate. Students need to apply 
for the certificate with documentation of eligibility at least 90 days 
before graduation. 

INTERNSHIPS 

Internship eligibility requirements for Electronic Media and Film 
are as follows: 
1. Junior or senior status 
2. Admitted to the EMF major 

3. Completion of courses related to the area of internship concen- 
tration, specifically: 

• EMF 140 and EMF 271 prior to any television or television 
broadcast journalism-related placement 

• EMF 221 and EMF 267 prior to any film placement 

• EMF 140 and EMF 265 prior to any radio or radio broadcast 
journalism-related placement 

• Cumulative GPA requirement: 2.75 overall; 3.00 in the major. 
Waivers are considered by the department. 

For additional information, contact the Career Center, or the 
Electronic Media and Film department. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Department of Electronic Media and Film offers several schol- 
arships for majors. For more information, contact the department, 
410-704-3184. 

DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES 

Department activities include support for the following active stu- 
dent organizations: National Broadcasting Society and the Film 
and Video Society. Students are also encouraged to participate in 
activities such as the Visual Media Laboratory, the campus radio 
stations, XTSR-AM and WIMD-FM, and the campus television 
station, WMJF-TV. 



DOUBLE MAJOR IN MASS COMMUNICATION OR 
COMMUNICATION STUDIES AND ELECTRONIC 
MEDIA AND FILM 

Students who wish to double major in Mass Communication or 
Communication Studies and Electronic Media and Film may apply 
up to 9 units simultaneously for satisfaction of both majors. 



108 



The College of Fine Arts and Communication 



Department of Mass 
Communication and 
Communication Studies 

Professors: Thorn Lieb, Mark McElreath, Richard Vatz 

Associate Professors: Charles Flippen {Chair), Beth Haller, 
Jung-Sook Lee, Audra McMullen, June Yum 

Assistant Professors: Meg Algren, Sean Baker, Kristen Campbell, 
Darren Coins, Kwangmi Ko-Kim, Kimberly Lauffer, Sandy 
Nichols 

Lecturers: Garry Bolan, Elizabeth Skmner 

Part-time Faculty: Robert G. Allen, Karen Amos, Dan Ashlock, 
Jennifer Arvvater, Elizabeth Atwood, Stephen Aug, Chris 
Baron, Scott Borgerding, John Brain, Mary Craig, Angela 
Davids, Judith DeCraene, Christine Demkowych, Michael 
DiBari, Jean Donnell, Richard Ellsberry, Mark Fernando, Amy 
Fink, Zack Germroth, Jason Heiserman, Carl Hyden, John 
Kastner, Sharyn Kuczka, Maggie Lears, Joan London, Terri 
Massie-Burrell, Tony Mastromatteo, Jad Melki, Sable Mi, 
Louise Miller, Page Miller, Charles Muth, Michael Naver, 
Carol Norton, Greg Rienzi, Sam Rubin, Elena Russo, Glen 
Schorr; Robert Sidelinger, Mark Sullivan, Lisa Turovvski, 
Shelley Vaughn, Ann Weir Ventre, Trevor Villet, Charles 
Yankovich 

Administrative Assistants: Mary Hickey, Donna Warrington 

Computer Lab Technician: Richard Ellsberry 

Assistant to the Chair: Kathy Marsalek 

Advising Coordinators: Jim Armstrong, Page Miller 



OFHCE 

Media Center 114,410- 
Fax: 410-704-3656 



'04-3431 



PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Mass Communication and Communication 
Studies offers the following programs of study: the 
Communication Studies major, the Mass Communication major, 
minors in both Communication Studies and Mass 
Communication, double majors in Political Science and 
Communication Studies and Political Science and Mass 
Communication, an interdisciplinary cooperative program with 
the departments of Marketing and Management, a certificate in 
Broadcast Journalism, a certificate in Sports Communication, a 
Master of Science in Communications Management, and a gradu- 
ate certificate in Strategic Public Relations and Integrated 
Communications. In addition, the department participates in a 
multidisciplinary program offering a Master of Science in Human 
Resource Development. 

The department focuses on the study of the structure, processes, 
aesthetics, functions and effects of human communication and 
mass media. In this, one of the most broad-based programs in 
Maryland and the region, students have the opportunity and flex- 
ibility to gain knowledge and skills in a wide array of communica- 
tion fields. In addition, the study of human communication and 
mass media involves strong practical content. 

At the undergraduate level, the department seeks to contribute 
to a broad, liberal education for majors and non-majors by raising 
their level of oral, visual and written communication literacy, as 
well as their critical thinkmg abilities, by developing their under- 
standing and appreciation of human message exchanges, and by 
recognizing how mass media and speech influence our social, polit- 
ical, artistic and cultural existence. In addition, the department 
seeks to provide knowledge as well as skill needed for future 



employment in print and broadcast journalism, new media, adver- 
tising, and public relations and/or in business, law, government, 
education and consulting wherein communication skills are essential. 
The faculty members of the department are committed to schol- 
arly research and/or creative productions in the department's vari- 
ous areas of expertise. As part of a metropolitan university's role 
in serving the region, the department is pledged to provide service 
to the university and to a larger community in a variet)' of ways, 
such as through its speech and debate program, affiliation with 
Lambda Pi Eta, American Advertising Foundation, Public 
Relations Group, Society of Professional Journalists, as well as fac- 
ulty and student presentations, workshops and professional net- 
working. 

MAJOR IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES 

The general purpose for majoring in Communication Studies is to 
understand and apply the process and function of human commu- 
nication, as well as the foundations of communication theory, to 
students' own discourse and to an evaluation of the discourse of 
others. The major allows students to develop skills in communica- 
tion as a method of inquiry and advocacy. 

Specifically, the major is intended to accomplish two objectives. 
First, students will be given several different opportunities to devel- 
op personal skills which enable them to secure public and private 
sector positions requiring communication competencies (i.e., 
speaking, writing, critical thinking, and advocacy skills for inter- 
personal, organizational and public settings). Second, students will 
become more liberally educated in personal and societal value 
structures, ethics, cultural heritage and the impact of messages 
upon the individual and society. 

Graduates with majors in Communication Studies have gone on 
to graduate school or careers in the public sector, private industry, 
or education, and in areas such as personnel, sales, lobbying, internal 
(organizational) communication, conference and meeting manage- 
ment, training and development, public affairs, corporate relations, 
law, religion, teaching or communication consulting. 

Graduation Requirements 

All major requirements must be completed with a grade equivalent 
of 2.00 or higher. The Pass grading option is not available for 
courses applicable toward the major. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Option 

Students may earn a Bachelor of Arts degree by completing the 
intermediate (200) level of a foreign language. 

Requirements for the Major 

The Communication Studies major requires a total of 36 units: 18 
units in the core, 6 units of theon,- and criticism courses, 3 units of 
applied communication courses and 9 units of electives as listed 
below. 

Required Courses (18 units) 

CO.MM 115 Intriiduction to Interpersonal Communication (3) 

COMM 131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 

COMM 211 Rhetorical Theory and Criticism (3) 

COMM 331 Advocacy and Argument (3) 

CO.MM 419 Organizational Communication (3) 

COMM 480 Communication Research (3) 

Theory and Criticism Courses (6 units) 

COMM 304 Persuasion (3) 

CO.VIM 321 Interpersonal Communication (3) 

COMM 378 Intcrcultural Communication (3) 

MCOM 352 Media Criticism (3) 

MCOM 41 1 Communication Process (3) 



Department of Mass Communication and Communication Studies 



109 



Applied Communication Courses (3 units) 

COMN4 216 Group Discussion (3) 

COMM 303 Advanced Public Speaking (3) 

COMM 315 Business and Professional Communication (3) 

Electives (9 units) 

COMM 249 Speech and Debate I (1.5) 

COMM 250 Speech and Debate II (1.5) 

COMM 301 Nonverbal Communication (3) 

COMM 349 Speech and Debate III (1.5) 

COMM 350 Speech and Debate IV (1.5) 

COMM 418 Communication Training and Development (3) 

COMM 420 Communication in the Legal Process (3) 

COMM 422 Conference and Meeting Management (3) 

COMM 470 Special Topics in Communication (3) 

COMM 490 Internship in Communication Studies (1-6)* 

CO.M.Vl 495 Independent Study in Communication Studies (1-6)* 

MCOM 214 Principles of Advertising (3) 

MCOM 253 Principles of Strategic Public Relations and Integrated 

Communications (3) 
Or any of the courses listed above under Theory and Criticism or Applied 
Communication. 

No more than 3 units of independent study and/or internships can be 
applied toward the Communication Studies maior. 

TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

Transfer students are required to complete 21 units in residence 
toward the Communication Studies ma|or. The department will 
accept up to 15 credits of compatible transfer courses. 

DOUBLE MAJOR IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES 
AND MASS COMMUNICATION 

Students who wish to complete a double major in Communication 
Studies and Mass Communication may apply up to 12 units simul- 
taneously toward fulfillment of both majors. 

MAJOR/MEsfOR IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES 
AND MASS COMMUNICATION 

Students who wish to major in Communication Studies and minor 
in Mass Communication may apply up to 6 units simultaneously 
toward fulfillment of both ma|or and minor. 

DOUBLE MAJOR IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES 
AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Students electing to major in both Communication Studies and 
Political Science must complete the requirements for both majors. 
Following the ouriine below, students can complete the two majors 
with 60 units of Communication Studies and Political Science 
courses. Completing these two majors separately requires a mini- 
mum of 72 units (36 units in each major). 

I. Required Courses in Political Science (15 units — see the Department 
of Political Science) 

II. Elective Courses in Political Science (21 units) 

Note: The Department of Political Science will accept two of the following 
communication studies courses (6 units) toward fulfillment of the electives 
in the Political Science major: 

COM.Vl 304 Persuasion (3) 

COM.M 331 Argument and Advocacy (3) 

COM.M 378 Intercultural Communication (3) 

COMM 420 Communication in the Legal Process (3) 

COM.Vl 470 Special Topics (3)* 

* Topic to he approved by the Department of Political Science 



. Required Courses in Communication Studies 

Required Courses (18 units — see the Department of Mass 
Communication and Communication Studies) 
Theory and Criticism Courses (6 units) 
Applied Communication Courses (3 units) 
Electives (9 units) 



Note: The Department of Mass Communication and Communication 
Studies will accept two of the following Political Science courses (6 units) 
toward fulfillment of the electives in the Communication Studies major: 



POSC30I 
POSC 340 
POSC 375 
POSC 381 
POSC 383 
POSC 417 
POSC 459 
POSC 470-479 



Political Research I (3) 
Comparative Public Policy 
Public Administration (3) 
Presidency (3) 
Congress (3) 
Political Parties (3) 
Simulation and Games (3) 
Special Topics (3)* 



* Topic to be approved by the Department of Mass Communication and 
Communication Studies 

MINOR IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES 

The Communication Studies minor requires 24 units: 15 units in 
the core, 3 units of theory and criticism courses, 3 units of applied 
communication courses and 3 units of electives as listed below. 

Graduation Requirements 

All minor requirements must be completed with a grade equivalent 
of 2.00 or higher. The Pass grading option is not available for 
courses applicable toward the minor. 

Combined Program with Mass Communication 

Students who w-ish to minor in Communication Studies and major 
in Mass Communication may apply up to 6 units simultaneously 
toward fulfillment of both major and minor. 

Required Core (15 units) 

See list under major requirements. All courses which appear there 
are required for the minor with the exception of COMM 480. 

Theory and Criticism Courses (3 units) 

See list under the ma|or requirements. 

Applied Communication Courses (3 units) 

See list under the major requirements. 

Electives (3 units) 

See list under the major requirements. COMM 480 may be added 

to this list. 

Note: No more than 3 units of independent study and/or intern- 
ships can be applied toward the Communication Studies minor. 

TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

The department will accept up to 9 credits of compatible transfer 
courses toward the minor. 



The College of Fine Arts and Communication 



PRE-MASS COMMUNICATION MAJOR 

Students interested in becoming undergraduate Mass Communication 
majors must become Pre-Mass Communication majors (PMCO) 
and enroll in three required screening courses as follows: 
ENGL 102 Writing for a Liberal Education (3) 
COMM 131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 
MCOM 101 Introduction to Mass Communication (3) 
Students cannot apply for MCOM as a major until they have 
completed these courses. 

Note: This requirement applies to incoming freshmen, transfer 
students, currently enrolled Towson University students and stu- 
dents working on a second bachelor's degree. 

Students are eligible to apply for admission to the Mass 
Communication (MCOM) major after completing at least 30 units 
at Towson University or elsewhere, and upon completion of the 
three courses above earning a minimum GPA of B (3.00) in these 
courses. No more than one of the screening courses can be repeated 
for the purpose of determining eligibility. PMCO students interest- 
ed in declaring MCOM as their major should submit applications 
to the department office to be considered for admission to the pro- 
gram. Attached to these applications should be official transcripts 
showing grades in the three courses identified above, including 
equivalent courses taken at other institutions. Several times a year, 
a group of eligible candidates, namely those who have completed 
the courses listed above and filed application forms with the 
department, will be selected to declare Mass Communication as a 
major. 

Students are reminded that admission to the MCOM major is 
highly competitive and limited to students who complete the 
screening courses, and earn the highest GPA among applicants. 
The higher a student's cumulative GPA in at least 30 units, the 
higher the probability of a student being offered admission to the 
MCOM major. Successful completion of the screening courses does 
not, in itself, guarantee admission to the MCOM program. The 
number selected will be on a space-available basis. The criteria 
used for selection will be the cumulative GPA from the three cours- 
es noted above, regardless of where those courses were taken, and 
the overall GPA at the time of application. The top percentage of 
students in each grouping will be admitted to the major, the spe- 
cific number being determined by the ability of the department to 
provide the needed courses/experiences for the majors. Students 
who are denied may re-apply for admission to the major. Appeals 
may be addressed to the department's Executive Committee. All 
appeals should be in the form of a letter accompanied by a tran- 
script. 

MAJOR IN MASS COMMUNICATION 

The Mass Communication major enables students to learn the 
practical application, structure, processes, aesthetics, responsibili- 
ties and effects of the mass media. The objectives of the Mass 
Communication major are 1) to provide students with appropriate 
training for careers in mass communication and 2) to help students 
become more critical consumers of the media. 

Mass Communication majors are expected to develop and refine 
their visual and written skills; to think critically about ways in 
which the mass media influence society; and, to recognize and 
appreciate the need for a broad and diverse liberal ans education. 

Students who complete the Mass Communication major will 
have many career options, especially in the broadly defined fields 
of print and broadcast journalism, new media, advertising, strate- 
gic public relations and integrated communications. Majors are 
expected to learn how the various fields in mass communication 
are structured and function and to understand how the media are 
converging and the consequences of that convergence. 



Students who complete the Mass Communication major are 
expected to: 

• understand and apply relevant theories of mass communication 

• understand and utilize research in mass communication 

• understand legal issues, statutes and regulations affecting mass 
communication 

• understand and apply ethical principles that can be used to pre- 
vent and resolve potential conflicts and dilemmas in the opera- 
tion of the mass media 

• demonstrate proficiency in writing for the mass media 

• demonstrate competence in the student's chosen track within the 
major 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Option 

Students may earn a Bachelor of Arts degree by completing the 
intermediate (200) level of a foreign language. 

Requirements for the Mass Communication Major 

The Mass Communication major requires 36 units: 9 units in core 
courses and 27 units in track courses. Students are required to ful- 
fill the requirements of one track. All major requirements must be 
completed with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. The Pass grad- 
ing option is not available for courses applicable to the major. 
Students are reminded that it is their responsibility to check all pre- 
requisites before registering for any course. 

Required Core Courses for All Three Tracks in the Major 
(9 units) 

MCOM 101 Introduction to Mass Communication (3) 

COMM 480 Communication Research (3) 

or 
MCOM 490 Mass Communication Research (3) 

.VICOM 350 Media Law (3) 



MCOM 433 



Media Ethics (3) 



JOURNALISM AND NEW MEDIA TRACK (27 units) 

Note: To begin this track, students should enroll in MCOM 255 News 
Writing (a special permit course). 

Required Basic Courses (12 units) 
MCOM 255 Newswriting(3) 

MCOM 358 News Editing (3) 

MCOM 407 Writing for New Media (3) 

Choose one of the following: 
MCOM 391 Photojournalism (3) 

or 
MCOM 415 Mass Media Graphics (3) 

Required Professional Skills Writing Courses (6 units) 

Choose two of the following: 

MCOM 356 Feature Writing (3) 

MCOM 383 News Reporting (3) 

MCOM 483 Computer-Assisted Reporting (3) 

MCOM 409 Literary Journalism (3) 

Track Electives (9 units) 

Choose from the followmg and from any courses not already chosen in 

the above groupings: 

MCOM 100 Usnig Information Effectively in Mass Communication (3) 

COMM 131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 

COMM 304 Persuasion (3) 

VICOM 341 Digital Publishing (3) 

.MCOM 352 .Media Criticism (3) 

MCOM 359 Magazine Publishing (3) 

MCOM 381 Broadcast Journalism (3) 

MCOM 385 Mass .Media and Society (3) 

MCOM 41 1 Communication Process (3) 

MCOM 431 Public Opinion and the Press (3) 

MCOM 457 Photoiournalism II (3) 

MCOM 460 Internship in Mass CAimmunication (1-6) 

MCOM 479 Special Topics in Journalism (3) 

MCO.M 496 Independent Study in Mass Communication ( 1-6) 



Department of Mass Communication and Communication Studies 



111 



Certificate in Broadcast Journalism 

Students completing the Mass Communication major in the 

Journalism and New Media Track are eligible tor a departmental 

Certificate in Broadcast Journalism if they take an additional five 

courses as specified below: 

EMF 221 Principles of Film and Media Production (3) 

EMF 265 Radio/Audio Production I (3) 

EMF 271 Television Studio Production (3) 

or 
EMF 373 Electronic Field Production (3) 

MCOM 381 Broadcast Journalism (3) 
EMF 481 Television Journalism (3) 

Students must earn a grade equivalent of 3.00 or higher in each of 
the above courses to receive the certificate. Students need to apply 
for the certificate with documentation of eligibility at least 90 days 
before graduation. 



ADVERTISING TRACK (27 units) 

Note: To begin this track, students should 
of Advertising (a special permit course). 



■nroll in MCOM 214 Principles 



Required Basic Courses (12 units) 

COMM 131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 
MCOM 214 Principles of Advertising (3) 
MCOM 323 Advertising Media Planning (3) 
MCOM 447 Advertising Campaigns (3) 



Media Analysis 

MCOM 352 .Media Criticism (3) 
MCOM 385 Mass Media and Society (3) 
MCOM 411 Communication Process (3) 

Communication Studies 

COMM 1 15 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3) 

COMM 303 Advanced Public Speaking (3) 

COMM 304 Persuasion (3) 

COMM 315 Business and Professional Communication (3) 

COMM 331 Advocacy and Argument (3) 

COMM 378 Intercultural Communication (3) 

Certificate in Advertising 

Students completing a Mass Communication major in the 
Advertising Track are eligible for a departmental Certificate in 
Advertising by having a GPA equivalent of 3.00 or higher in the 
track courses taken at TU and by completing MCOM 460 
Internship in Mass Communication. Students need to apply for the 
certificate with documentation of eligibility at least 90 days before 
graduation. 

STRATEGIC PUBLIC RELATIONS AND INTEGRATED 
COMMUNICATIONS TRACK (27 units) 

Note: To begin this track, students should enroll in MCOM 253 Principles 
of Strategic Public Relations and Integrated Communications (a special permit 
course). 



Required Professional Skills Writing Courses (6 units) 
MCOM 325 Advertising Copywriting (3) 
Choose one of the following: 
MCOM 255 News Writing (3) 

or 
MCOM 357 Public Relations Writing (3) 

Track Electives (9 units) 

The following groupings are designed to help students in their 
selection of electives. Choose from the following and from any 
courses not chosen in the above groupings: 



Advertising 

MCOM 440 
MCOM 443 
MCOM 445 
MCOM 460 
MCOM 496 



Advertising Media Sales (3) 
International Advertising and Public Relations (3) 
Corporate and Institutional Advertising (3) 
Internship in Mass Communication (1-6) 
Independent Study in Mass Communication (1-6) 



Strategic Public Relations and Integrated Communication 

MCOM 253 Principles of Strategic Public Relations and Integrated 

Communications (3) 
MCOM 451 Public Relations for Nonprofit Organizations (3) 
MCOM 453 Strategic Public Relations and Integrated 

Communications Campaigns (3) 
MCOM 459 Professional Issues in Public Relations, Advertising and 

Integrated Communications (3) 
COMM 419 Organizational Communication (3) 
COMM 422 Conference and Meeting Management (3) 

Electronic Media and Film 

EMF 140 Introduction to Electronic Media (3) 

EMF 221 Principles of Film and Media Production (3) 

EMF 271 Television Studio Production (3) 

EMF 373 Electronic Field Production (3) 

EMF 377 Broadcast/Film Writing (3) 

Journalism 

MCOM 100 Using Information Effectively in Mass Communication (3) 

MCOM 356 Feature Writing (3) 

MCOM 358 News Editing (3) 

MCOM 359 Magazine Publishing (3) 

MCOM 391 Photojournalism I (3) 

MCOM 407 Writing for New Media (3) 

MCOM 415 Mass Media Graphics (3) 

MCOM 431 Public Opinion and the Press (3) 



Required Basic Courses (12 units) 

COMM 131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 
MCOM 253 Principles of Strategic Public Relations and Integrated 

Communications (3) 
COMM 419 Organizational Communication (3) 
MCOM 453 Public Relations and Integrated Communications 

Campaigns (3) 

Required Professional Skills Writing Courses (6 units) 

MCOM 357 Public Relations Writing (3) 

Choose one of the following: 

MCOM 325 Advernsing Copywriting (3) 

or 
MCOM 255 Newswriting (3) 

Track Electives (9 units) 

The following groupings are designed to help students in their 
selection of electives. Choose from the following groupings and 
from any courses not chosen in the above groupings: 

Strategic Public Relations and Integrated Communications 

MCOM 451 Puhlic Relations for Nonprofit Organizations (3) 
MCOM 459 Professional Issues in Public Relations, Advertising 

and Integrated Communications (3) 
MCOM 460 Internship in Mass Communication ( 1-6) 
MCOM 496 Independent Study in Mass Communication (1-6) 



Advertising 

MCOM 214 
MCOM 323 
MCOM 440 
MCOM 443 
MCOM 445 
MCOM 447 



Principles of Advertising (3) 

Advertising Media Planning (3) 

Advertising Media Sales (3) 

International Advertising and Public Relations (3) 

Corporate or Institutional Advertising (3) 

Advertising Campaigns (3) 



Electronic Media and Film 

EMF 140 Introduction to Electronic Media (3) 

EMF 221 Principles of Film and Media Production (3) 

EMF 265 Radio Production I (3) 

EMF 271 Television Studio Production (3) 

EMF 273 Electronic Field Production (3) 

EMF 377 Broadcast/Film Writing (3) 



112 



The College of Fine Arts and Communication 



Journalism 

MCOM 100 Using Information Effectively in Mass Communication (3) 

MCOM 356 Feature Writmg (3) 

MCOM 358 News Editing (3) 

MCOM 359 Magazine Publishing (3) 

MCOM 383 News Reporting (3) 

MCOM 391 Photojournalism I (3) 

MCOM 407 Writing for New Media (3) 

MCOM 415 Mass Media Graphics (3) 

MCOM 431 Public Opinion and the Press (3) 

Media Analysis 

MCOM 352 ' Media Criticism (3) 
MCOM 385 Mass Media and Society (3) 
MCOM 411 Communication Process (3) 

Communication Studies 

COMM 115 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3) 

COMM 303 Advanced Public Speaking (3) 

COMM 304 Persuasion (3) 

COMM 315 Business and Professional Communication (3) 

COMM 331 Advocacy and Argument (3) 

COMM 378 Intercultural Communication (3) 

COMM 422 Conference and Meeting Management (3) 

Certificate in Strategic Public Relations and Integrated 
Communications 

Students completing a Mass Communication major in the Strategic 
Public Relations and Integrated Communications Track are eligi- 
ble for a departmental Certificate in Strategic Public Relations and 
Integrated Communications by having a GPA equivalent of 3.00 
or higher in the track courses taken at TU and by completing 
MCOM 460 Internship in Mass Communication. Students need to 
apply for the certificate with documentation of eligibility at least 
90 days before graduation. 

Certificate in Sports Communication 

Students completing a Mass Communication major in the 
Strategic Pubhc Relations and Integrated Communications 
(SPRIC) Track are eligible for a departmental Certificate in Sports 
Communication if they fulfill the following: 

Complete the following SPRIC Trjck electives: (9 units) 
EMF 140 
EMF22I 
EMF 265 



EMF 271 



Introduction to Electronic .Media (3) 

Principles of Film & Media Production (3) 

Radio/Audio Production I (3) 

or 

Television Studio Production (3) 



Complete one of the following courses outside the SPRIC Track: 
EMF 365 Radio/Audio Production II (3) 

or 
EMF 373 Electronic Field Production (3) 

or 
EMF 403 Sportscasting (3) 

Complete three of the following kinesiology courses: (9 units) 

KNES 349 The Modern Olympic Games (3) 

KNES 353 Sport and Society (3) 

KNES 355 Psychology of Sport (3) 

KNES 357 Sport in Film (3) 

KNES 441 The American Woman in Sport (3) 

KNES 451 History of American Sport (3) 

Notes about the major: 

1) Students must complete at least 18 units of upper-level course 
work in the major. 

2) No more than 6 units of independent study and/or internships 
can be applied to the Mass Communication major. 

3) The Pass grading option is not available for courses applied to 
the major. 



4) Students who wish to double major in Mass Communication and 
Communication Studies may apply up to 12 units simultaneous- 
ly for satisfaction of both majors. Students who wish to major in 
Mass Communication and minor in Communication Studies 
may apply 6 units simultaneously for satisfaction of both major 
and minor. 

5) Students who wish to double major in Mass Communication and 
Electronic Media and Film may apply up to 9 units simultane- 
ously for satisfaction of both majors. Students who wish to 
major in Mass Communication and minor in Electronic Media 
and Film may apply 6 units simultaneously for satisfaction of 
both major and minor. 

6) Transfer students are required to take 21 units in residence in 
their major area. The department will transfer up to 15 units of 
compatible courses. 

7) In fulfilling the requirements for the Mass Communication 
major, students may choose the option of satisfying requirements 
for both the Advertising and the Strategic Public Relations and 
Integrated Communications tracks. 

DOUBLE MAJOR IN MASS COMMUNICATION AND 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Students electing to major in both Mass Communication and 
Political Science must complete the requirements for both majors. 
Following the outline below, students can complete the two majors 
with 60 units of Mass Communication and Political Science cours- 
es. Completing these two majors separately requires a minimum of 
72 units (36 units in each major). 

I. Mass Communication 

A. Required Core Courses (9 units) 

B. Required Track Courses (12 units) 

C. Required Professional Skills Writing Courses (6 units) 

D. Electives (9 units) 

Note: The department will accept two of the following political science 
courses (6 units) toward fulfillment of the electives in the Mass 
Communication major: 



POSC301 
POSC 340 
POSC 375 
POSC 381 
POSC 383 
POSC 417 
POSC 459 
POSC 470-479 



Political Research I (3) 
Comparative Public Policy (3) 
Public Administration (3) 
Presidency (3) 
Congress (3) 
Political Parties (3) 
Simulation and Games (3) 
Special Topics (3)* 



* Topic to be approved by the Department of Mass Communication and 
Communication Studies 

II. Political Science 

A. Required Courses in Political Science (15 units — see the 
Department of Political Science) 

B. Elective Courses in Political Science (21 units) 

Note: The Department of Political Science will accept two of the following 
mass communication courses (6 units) toward fulfillment of the electives in 
the Political Science major: 

MCOM 350 Media Law (3) 

MCOM 352 Media Criticism (3) 

MCOM 385 Mass Media and Society (3) 

.MCOM 431 Public Opinion and the Press (3) 

MCO.VI 433 Media Ethics (3) 



Department of Mass Communication and Communication Studies 



113 



MARKETING INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIALIZATION 
FOR MASS COMMUNICATION 

The Marketing Interdisciplinary Specialization tor Mass 
Communication requires completion of the Mass Communication 
major in the Public Relations or Advertising Track and 15 units as 
listed below. Students must earn a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher 
in each required course below. Students completing this specializa- 
tion will receive a departmental certificate. Students need to apply 
for the certificate in the Department of Marketing office with doc- 
umentation of eligibility at least 90 days before graduation. 

Marketing Specialization 
MKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (3) 
MKTG 345 Advertising Management (3) 
MKTG 351 Sales Management (3) 
MKTG 425 Buyer Behavior Analysis (3) 
MKTG 445 International Marketing (3) 

MINOR IN MASS COMMUNICATION 

The Mass Communication minor requires a total of 24 units: 9 
units in required core courses, 6 units of approved writing courses 
and 9 units of upper-division electives (see major listings). 

Core Required Courses (9 units) 

See list under the major requirements. 

Writing Courses (6 units) 

See list under the major requirements. 

Electives (9 units) 

Any upper-division courses listed under electives for the major. 

Note: No more than 3 units of independent study and/or intern- 
ships can be applied toward the Mass Communication minor. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

All minor requirements must be completed with a grade equivalent 
of 2.00 or higher. The Pass grading option is not available for 
courses applicable toward the minor. 

COMBINED PROGRAMS WITH ELECTRONIC MEDIA 
AND FILM AND COMMUNICATION STUDIES 

Students who wish to minor in Mass Communication and major in 
either Electronic Media and Film or Communication Studies may 
apply up to 6 units simultaneously toward fulfillment of both 
major and minor. 



DEPARTMENTAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Patrick J. O'Connell Memorial Scholarship is available for 
Mass Communication students with a special interest in broadcast 
journalism, journalism, advertising or public relations. Other 
scholarships include the Eddie Ballard Award for Journalism, the 
O'Connor Radio Broadcasting Scholarship, the Sam Lacy Sports 
Communication Scholarship, the Jamie Parker Memorial 
Scholarship, the George Rogers Jr. Memorial Scholarship, the 
Murfin Scholarship, the Elizabeth Wainio Memorial Scholarship, 
the Public Relations Society of America Scholarship and speech and 
debate program scholarships. For scholarship information and 
deadlines, contact the department scholarship coordinator. 

DEPARTMENTAL ACTFVITIES 

Department activities include support for the following student 
organizations: Speech and Debate Team, Pi Kappa Delta (national 
honorary forensic society). Pi Lambda Eta (national honorary soci- 
ety in communication), the American Advertising Foundation 
Chapter, the Public Relations Student Group, and the Society for 
Professional Journalists. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

Through its departmental honors program, the mass communica- 
tion faculty recognizes students for academic excellence. Mass 
Communication majors with an overall GPA of 3.25 and a 3.50 in 
their major are eligible to participate in the program. To graduate 
with honors in Mass Communication, students must complete 6 
units in MCOM Independent Study and MCOM 499 Honors 
Thesis. In addition, the student is required to make an oral presen- 
tation to the Thesis Committee, which is open to the public. At 
graduation, students will be recognized for honors both on the 
diploma and permanent transcript. Students interested in depart- 
mental honors should consult with the department's honors coordi- 
nator no later than the first term of their junior year. 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 

Information regarding the various graduate programs is included in 
the Graduate Catalog. The department offers a master's degree in 
Communications Management, and a certificate in Strategic Public 
Relations and Integrated Communications. 



TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

The department will accept up to 9 credits of compatible transfer 
courses toward the minor. 



INTERNSHIPS 

Internship eligibility requirements for Communication Studies and 
Mass Communication are as follows: 
L Junior or senior status 

2. Major must be declared 

3. Completion of courses related to the area of internship 
concentration, specifically: 

• MCOM 101 and 255 prior to any print journalism placement 

• MCOM 101 and 253 prior to any public relations placement 

• MCOM 101 and 214 prior to any advertising placement 

• COMM 115 and 131 prior to any Communication Studies 
placement 

4. GPA requirement: 2.75 overall; 3.00 in the major. Waivers are 
considered by the department. 



114 



The College of Fine Arts and Communication 



Department of Music 

Professors: Cecylia Barczyk, Terry B. Ewell (Chair), Michael 
Jothen, William Kleinsasser, Paul Rardin, Dale Rauschenberg, 
Reynaldo Reyes, Dana Rothlisberger, Carl B. Schmidt, Zoltan 
Szabo 

Associate Professors: James Anthony, Leneida Crawford, Michael 
Decker, Luis Engeike, Diane Luchese, Cristina Magaldi, Eva 
Mengekoch, Alicia Mueller, Gerald Phillips, Donald Watts 

Assistant Professors: Marguerite Baker, David Ballou, Phillip 
Collister, Joshua Davis, Brenda Leach, Jonathan Leshnoff, 
Christine Limb 

Part-time Faculty: Michael Bayes, Alan Blackman, Michael Bunn, 
Beniamm Chouinard, Lawrence E. Crawford, Ryan DeRyke, 
Victor Dvoskin, Laurie Flint, Joanna Greenwood, Harold E. 
Griswold, Ah Hong, Bernard Hynson, Mary Claire Ingalls, 
Nancy Larson, Niki Lee, Stephen Lilly, Henry Lowe, Martha 
McCoy, James McFalls, Philip Munds, Timothy Murphy, Sara 
Nichols, Sherrie Norwitz, Phil Snedecor, Leslie Starr, Granville 
Wilson 

Assistant to the Chairperson: Mary Ann Criss 

Computer/Audio Manager: John Spivey 

OFFICE 

Center for the Arts 3095, 410-704-2839 

Fax:410-704-2841 

ww^v. towson.edu/music 

ADMISSION TO THE DEPARTMENT 

Degree programs in music are fully accredited with the National 
Association of Schools of Music and the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education. 

The Music major is a screened major. Admission to the Music 
major is granted only by the department, contingent upon a per- 
formance audition. Admission to the university does not guarantee 
acceptance as a Music major or minor. Further, continuance in the 
major is contingent on a number of evaluative processes estab- 
lished by the department. Proper course planning and regular 
meetings with advisers are key to timely completion of the pro- 
grams in four years. Students are responsible for determining the 
progress and completion of their degree programs. 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Music offers two professional degree pro- 
grams, the Bachelor of Music and Bachelor of Science in Music 
Education; and one liberal arts degree program, the Bachelor of 
Science in Music. The concentrations within the two professional 
degree programs are outlined on the following pages. 

Although there are courses common to all degree programs and 
concentrations within those programs, each program is designed 
with its own special requirements, especially in the junior and sen- 
ior years. Those requirements are found on the following pages. 

A Music minor is available for those students who desire to pur- 
sue music studies as a secondary field. 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Private Vocal or Instrumental Lessons and Master Classes 
Every Music major must enroll for private lessons on an instru- 
ment or in voice with an instructor provided by the university. All 
students enrolled for private vocal or instrumental lessons are 
required to attend a weekly master class. Activities in master class- 
es range from topics concerning the instrument, prevention of per- 
formance injuries, pedagogy and performances by students, faculty 
and guest artists. 



Evaluative Processes Comprising the Screened Major 
The following items comprise the various evaluative processes stu- 
dents must successfully negotiate if they are to continue in and 
complete the Music major. 

Juries and Upper-division Juries 

All students must perform before a faculty jury at the end of each 
term in which they are enrolled in private vocal or instrumental les- 
sons. 

To enroll in 300-level private lessons, students must complete the 
upper-division, double-length jury examination. 

Keyboard Proficiency 

Music majors must reach the level of keyboard proficiency estab- 
lished for their specific degree and concentration. For Music 
Education majors, a keyboard proficiency exam is scheduled on the 
Friday of the first week of fall and spring term classes. Successful 
completion of Keyboard Proficiency is required for enrollment in 
Methods of Teaching Instrumental Music in the Elementary School 
(MUED 306) or Methods of Teaching Vocal-General Music in the 
Elementary School (MUED 307). 

The Bachelor of Music degree allows students to satisfy the 
Keyboard Proficiency requirement by passing Piano Class I (MUSA 
190), Piano Class II (MUSA 191), and Piano Class ID (MUSA 290). 
Keyboard Performance majors, however, are exempt from Piano 
Class I, Piano Class II, and Piano Class III, but must satisfy the key- 
board proficiency requirement by passing Keyboard Harmony and 
Sight Reading I (MUSC 313) and Keyboard Harmony and Sight 
Reading II (MUSC 314). 

Recital Attendance 

All Music majors are required to attend three faculty, guest artist or 
evening honors recitals; two ensemble and two student recitals dur- 
ing each term of their freshman, sophomore and junior enrollment 
(totaling 42 events over 6 terms). Convocation and daytime honors 
recitals are mandatory and do not count toward the total. 

For transfer students, the numbers are pro-rated according to the 
number of terms they will attend Towson and after discussion with 
the department chairperson. 

Students who do not meet attendance requirements are granted 
a one-term grace period. Otherwise, they may be denied permission 
to continue to register as Music majors. Appeals are heard by the 
department chairperson. 

Recital requirements prior to fall 2004 will not be altered. 

Degree Recitals 

The Music Education Concentrations and the Composition 
Concentration require a senior recital. The Performance 
Concentrations require both junior and senior recitals. Students 
pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Music may choose to perform a 
recital as their capstone expetience. 

Students must enroll in private lessons the term they present a 
recital. Senior recital may not be taken during the same term as 
student teaching. 

Ensembles 

All Music ma|ors are required to participate in ensembles. 
Ensembles will be varied in both size and nature. Each degree pro- 
gram and/or concentration has its own set of expectations. These 
are listed on the following pages. 

Contact the Department of Music for information concerning 
times and requirements for ensemble auditions. Most auditions are 
scheduled during the first week of classes. If a student registers for 
an ensemble and is not selected, it is the student's responsibihty to 
officially drop the ensemble from his or her schedule through the 
university's Office of the Registrar. 



Department of Music 



115 



Graduation Requirements 

Majors must earn a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher in all Music 
major courses, ensembles and lessons. This includes foreign lan- 
guages and Music Education core courses required of degree pro- 
grams. The Pass grading option is not available for courses applied 
to the major. 

In addition to the required Music major courses, students must 
fulfill the General Education requirements found in the University 
Curriculum section in this catalog. Notes: (1) GenEd II.B.l is ful- 
filled by MUSC 201 and (2) GenEd I.D is fulfilled by MUSC 302. 
Universir\' regulations require students to accrue no fewer than 32 
upper-division (300-400) units for graduation. 

The department also supports the Early Childhood and 
Elementary Education programs by offering individual Methods of 
Teaching Music for each instructional level. In addition, a specific 
section of Music Fundamentals is offered for majors in the 
Department of Dance. 

TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

Transfer of major credit is based upon an audition, a review of 
transcripts and an interview with the department chairperson. 
Transfer students must meet with the department chairperson 
immediately after matriculating. 

All Music majors must complete a minimum of 24 major units 
at Towson Lfniversit)-, all of which are upper-level (300-400) courses. 

All Music minors must complete a minimum of 12 units at 
Towson University that meet the upper-division electives require- 
ment in Section II of the Minor in Music section in this catalog. 

MAJOR IN MUSIC EDUCATION - 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Students majoring in Music Education are required to complete the 
courses listed below, the Music Education Professional Core 
Courses and the GenEd requirements. Students choose either the 
Instrumental Music Education Concentration or the Vocal-General 
Music Education Concentration. 

Successful completion of the program certifies students to teach 
music at the K-12 level in Maryland (and other states with which 
reciprocal agreements exist). Certification requires successful com- 
pletion of courses and requirements in a selected degree program, 
a criminal background check, the Praxis Examination parts I and 
n, and the Towson University speech and hearing screenings. 

Requirements for Admission to the Teacher Education Program 

All students applying for admission to a Teacher Education pro- 
gram are required to complete a Criminal Background Disclosure 
Form. This form is to be notarized and sent to the director of the 
Center for Professional Practice, Hawkins Hall, room 302, to be 
kept on file. 

Requirements for Internship and/or Student Teaching 

Effective fall 1999, all pre-service students in Teacher Education 
programs, whose program of study requires an intensive/extensive 
internship or student teaching experience in a public or private 
school setting (pre-K through 12), are required to complete and file 
a Criminal Background Disclosure Form (see above). 

To register for student teaching, all pre-service students must 
complete and submit their scores on the Praxis I, Academic Skills 
Assessments, to the Center for Professional Practice (CPP). 
Information on the Praxis tests is available in the CPP Office, 
Hawkins Hall, room 302. 



INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC EDUCATION 

CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS (66 units) 

MUSA XXX Private Lessons in one instrument or percussion area (7) 

.MUSA xxx Ensembles (8.5) 

Wind and Percussion students: nvo terms in lower-division 
Symphonic Band or Orchestra (2); three terms in upper- 
division Symphonic Band or Orchestra (3); one term in 
ensemble other than Symphonic Band, Marching Band, or 
Orchestra (1); two terms in Marching Band (2); one term 
in Conducting Lab Ensemble (.5) 

String students: three terms in lower-division Symphonic 
Band or Orchestra (3); three terms in upper-division 
Symphonic Band or Orchestra (3); one term in ensemble 
other than Symphonic Band, .Marching Band, or Orchestra 
(1); one term in Marching Band (1); one term in 
Conducting Lab Ensemble (.5) 

MUSA 498 Senior Recital (1) 

MUSC 131 Theory I (2) 

MUSC 132 Theon' II (2) 

MUSC 133 Musicianship I (2) 

MUSC 134 Musicianship II (2) 

MUSC 201 Music in the U.S., Analvtic Emphasis (3) 

MUSC 23 1 TheorvIII(2) 

MUSC 232 Theorv IV (2) 

MUSC 233 Musicianship III (2) 

MUSC 234 Musicianship IV (2) 

MUSC 301 Western Music to 1750 (3) 

MUSC 302 Western .Music from 1750-1914 (3) 

MUSC 329 Instrumental Conducting (3) 

MUSC 335 Choral and Instrumental Arranging (3) 

MUSC 405 Western Music from 1914 to the Present (3) 

MUED201 Brass Class 1(1) 

MUED202 Brass Class 11(1) 

MUED 203 Lower String Class ( 1 ) 

MUED 204 Upper String Class ( 1 ) 

MUED 205 Woodwind Class 1(1) 

.MUED 206 Woodwind Class 11(1) 

MUED 207 Percussion Class 1(1) 

MUED 208 Percussion Class II ( 1 ) 

MUED 210 Voice Class (1) 

MUED 220 Percussion Workshop (percussion students only) (1) 

MUED 301 Marching Band Techniques (.5) 

MUED 306 Methods of Teaching Instrumental Music in the 
Elementary School (4) 

.VILIED 308 .Methods of Teaching Instrumental Music in the 
Secondary School (2) 

Music Education Professional Core Courses (30 units) 

EDUC 40 1 Foundations of Education (3) 

ELED 324 Integrating Literacy in K-12 Content Areas (3) 

MUED 310 Introduction to Music in Special Education (3) 

MUED 391 Elementary^ Student Teaching (6) 

MUED 392 Secondary Student Teaching (6) 

MUED 401 Integrating Literacy in the Music Classroom (3) 

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) 

PSYC 201 Educational Psychology (3) 

VOCAL-GENERAL MUSIC EDUCATION 

CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS (59-61 units) 

.VIUSA xxx Private lessons in one area (7) 

.VI USA xxx Ensembles (7-8) 

Keyboard students: (8 terms): four in Chorale or Choral 
Society; one in Music for the Stage; and three selected from 
Early Music Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble-Vocal, Jazz 
Ensemble-Combo, World Music Ensemble, Music Theatre 
Chorus; and Solo and Ensemble Accompanying 
Vocal students: (7 terms): three in Chorale or Choral 
Society; one in .Music for the Stage; one selected from Early 
Music Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble-Vocal, Jazz Ensemble- 
Combo, World Music En.semble, Music Theatre Chorus; 
and 2 elective units from any of the above (only one of 
which may be in .Music for the Stage) 



116 



The College of Fine Arts and Communication 



Guitar students: (8 terms): four in Chorale or Choral 
Society; one in Music for the Stage; one selected from 
Early Music Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble-Vocal, Music 
Theatre Chorus, Jazz Ensemble-Combo, or World Music 
Ensemble; and two in an instrumental ensemble m which 
the student plavs guitar 

MUSA498 Senior Recital (1) 

MUSC 131 Theory I (2) 

MUSC 132 Theory II (2) 

MUSC 133 Musicianship I (2) 

MUSC 134 Musicianship II (2) 

MUSC 201 Music in the U.S.; Analytic Emphasis (3) 

MUSC 231 Theory III (2) 

MUSC 232 Theory IV (2) 

MUSC 233 Musicianship III (2) 

MUSC 234 Musicianship IV (2) 

MUSC 301 Western M usic to 1 750 ( 3 ) 

MUSC 302 Western Music from 1750-1914 (3) 

MUSC 327 Choral Conducting (3) 

MUSC 335 Choral and Instrumental Arranging (3) 

MUSC 405 Western Music from 1914-Present (3) 

MUED 209 Teaching Guitar in the Classroom (2) 

MUED210 Voice Class (guitar and keyboard students only) (I) 

MUED 307 Methods of Teaching Vocal-General Music in the 
Elementary School (4) 

MUED 309 Methods of Teaching Vocal-General Music in the 
Secondary School (2) 

MUED 337 Teaching Choral Music in the Elementary and Secondary 
School (2) 

Music Education Professional Core Courses (30 units) 

EDUC 401 Foundations of Education (3) 

ELED 324 Integrating Literacy in K-12 Content Areas (3) 

MUED 310 Introduction to Music in Special Education (3) 

MUED 391 Elementary Student Teaching (6) 

MUED 392 Secondary Student Teaching (6) 

MUED 401 Integrating Literacy in the Music Classroom (3) 

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) 

PSYC 201 Educational Psychology (3) 

MAJOR IN MUSIC - 
BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE 

Students concentrating in Composition, Jazz/Commercial 
Performance, Jazz/Commercial Composition, or Performance are 
required to complete the courses listed below and the GenEd 
requirements. 

COMPOSITION CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS 

(81 units) 

MUSA XXX Private lessons in a single medium (6) 

MUSA XXX Ensembles — Students should register for a diversity of size 
and style in ensembles with a minimum of two different 
ensembles. The choice and availability of ensembles will 
depend on the particular performance area and level of 
each student. (8) 

MUSA 190 Piano Class I (1) 

MUSA 191 Piano Class 11(1) 

MUSA 200 Private Composition lessons (2) 

MUSA 290 Piano Class III (1) 

.VIUSA 300 Private Composition lessons (4) 

MUSA 400 Private Composition lessons (4) 

MUSA 499 Senior Recital (1) 

MUED 210 Voice Class (1) 

MUSC 131 Theory I (2) 

.MUSC 132 Theory II (2) 

MUSC 133 Musicianship I (2) 

MUSC 134 Musicianship II (2) 

MUSC 135 Computer Applications (3) 

MUSC 201 Music in the U.S.; Analytic Emphasis (3) 

MUSC 231 Theory III (2) 

MUSC 232 Theory IV (2) 



MUSC 233 Musicianship III (2) 

MUSC 234 Musicianship IV (2) 

MUSC 301 Western Music to 1750 (3) 

MUSC 302 Western Music from 1750-1914 (3) 

MUSC 327 Choral Conducting (3) 

or 

MUSC 329 Instrumental Conducting (3) 

MUSC 335 Choral and Instrumental Arranging (3) 

MUSC 405 Western Music from 1914 to the Present (3) 

MUSC 414 Counterpoint (3) 

MUSC 431 Advanced Arranging (3) 

MUSC XXX Upper-division MUSC electives (9) 



GUITAR PERFORMANCE CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS 

(82 units) 

Private guitar lessons (16) 

Ensembles ( 12) 

4 units Guitar Ensemble, 4 units any vocal ensemble, 

4 units any ensemble 

Piano Class 1(1) 

Piano Class 11(1) 

Piano Class III (1) 

Junior Recital (1) 

Senior Recital (1) 

Theory 1 (2) 

Theory 11 (2) 

Musicianship 1 (2) 

Musicianship II (2) 

Music in the U.S.; Analytic Emphasis (3) 

Theory III (2) 

Theory IV (2) 

Musicianship III (2) 

Musicianship IV (2) 

Western Music to 1750 (3) 

Western Music from 1750-1914 (3) 

Survey of the Music Industry (3) 

Choral Conducting (3) 

or 

Instrumental Conducting (3) 

Western Music from 1914 to the Present (3) 

History and Literature of Guitar, Lute and Vihuela (3) 

Guitar Pedagogy (3) 

Upper-division MUSC electives (9) 



MUSC XXX 
MUSA XXX 



MUSA 190 
MUSA 191 
MUSA 290 
MUSA 399 
MUSA 499 
MUSC 131 
MUSC 132 
MUSC 133 
MUSC 134 
MUSC 201 
MUSC 231 
MUSC 232 
MUSC 233 
MUSC 234 
MUSC 301 
MUSC 302 
MUSC 305 
MUSC 327 

MUSC 329 
MUSC 405 
MUSC 409 
MUSC 462 
MUSC XXX 



JAZZ/COMMERCLAL COMPOSITION CONCENTRATION 

REQUIREMENTS (80 units) 

MUSA XXX Private lessons in a single medium (6) 

MUSA XXX Ensembles — 4 terms among a minimum of two different 

jazz ensembles, 4 terms in other ensembles (8) 

MUSA 190 Piano Class 1(1) 

MUSA 191 Piano Class II (1) 

MUSA 200 Composition private lessons (2) 

MUSA 290 Piano Class III (1) 

MUSA 300 Composition private lessons (4) 

MUSA 400 Composition private lessons (4) 

MUSA 499 Senior Recital (1) 

MUSC 131 Theory I (2) 

MUSC 132 Theory II (2) 

MUSC 133 Musicianship I (2) 

MUSC 134 Musicianship II (2) 

MUSC 135 Computer Applications (3) 

MUSC 201 Music in the U.S.; Analytic Emphasis (3) 

MUSC 231 Theory III (2) 

MUSC 232 Theory IV (2) 

MUSC 233 Musicianship III (2) 

MUSC 234 Musicianship IV (2) 

MUSC 301 Western Music to 1750 (3) 

MUSC 302 Western Music from 1750-1914 (3) 

MUSC 305 Survey of the Music Industry (3) 

MUSC 320 Jazz Theory and Improvisation 1 (3) 

MUSC 329 Instrumental Conducting (3) 

MUSC 335 Choral and Instrumental Arranging (3) 

MUSC 405 Western Music from 1914 to the Present (3) 

MUSC 426 Jazz History (3) 

MUSC 427 Jazz Arranging (3) 

MUSC XXX Upper-division MUSC elective (3) 



Department of Music 



117 



JAZZ/COMMERCIAL PERFORMANCE 

CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS (82 units) 

MUSC xxx Private lessons (16) 

Saxophone majors — 8 units jazz/commercial saxophone 
and 8 units in at least one woodwind double; bass 
majors — 8 units acoustic, 8 units electric; guitar majors — 8 
units jazz/commercial guitar, 8 units classical or other fretted 
instruments; percussion majors — 8 units drum set, 8 units 
mallets, timpani, multiple percussion; other instruments — 
8 units of ]azz/commercial in primary instrument. 8 units 
of 100- and 200-level classical lessons in primary instru- 
ment; voice majors — 8 units in jazz/commercial voice, 
8 units in 100- and 200-level voice lessons 

MUSC xxx Ensembles — 8 terms among a minimum of three jazz 
ensembles; 6 terms of other ensembles (14) 

MUSA 190 Piano Class 1(1) 

MUSA 191 Piano Class 11(1) 

MUSA 290 Piano Class III (1) 

MUSA 399 Junior Recital (1) 

MUSA 499 Senior Recital (1) 

MUSC 131 TheorvI(2) 

MUSC 132 Theory II (2) 

MUSC 133 Musicianship I (2) 

MUSC 134 Musicianship II (2) 

MUSC 201 Music in the U.S.; Analytic Emphasis (3) 

MUSC 231 Theory III (2) 

MUSC 232 Theory IV (2) 

MUSC 233 Musicianship III (2) 

MUSC 234 Musicianship IV (2) 

MUSC 301 Western Music to 1750 (3) 

MUSC 302 Western Music from 1750-1914 (3) 

MUSC 305 Survey of the Music Industry (3) 

MUSC 320 Jazz Theory and Improvisation I (3) 

MUSC 322 Jazz Theory and Improvisation II (3) 

MUSC 329 Instrumental Conducting (3) 

MUSC 426 Jazz History (3) 

MUSC 427 Jazz Arranging ( 3 ) 

MUSC 443 Instrumental Pedagogy ( 1 ) 

MUSC xxx Upper-division MUSC elective (3) 

KEYBOARD PERFORMANCE CONCENTRATION 

REQUIREMENTS (Piano) (83 units) 

MUSA xxx Private piano lessons (16) 

MUSA xxx Private pipe organ, harpsichord or voice lessons (2) 

MUSA xxx Ensembles — 5 terms in Solo/Ensemble Accompanying, 

2 units in any other ensemble (7) 

MUSA 399 Junior Recital (1) 

MUSA 499 Senior Recital (1) 

MUSC 131 Theory I (2) 

MUSC 132 Theory II (2) 

MUSC 133 Musicianship I (2) 

MUSC 134 .Musicianship II (2) 

MUSC 201 Music in the U.S.; Analvtic Emphasis (3) 

MUSC 231 Theory III (2) 

MUSC 232 Theory IV (2) 

MUSC 233 Musicianship III (2) 

MUSC 234 Musicianship IV (2) 

MUSC 30 1 Western Music to 1750 (3) 

MUSC 302 Western .Music from 1750-1914 (3) 

MUSC 313 Keyboard Harmony and Sight Reading I (2) 

MUSC 314 Keyboard Harmony and Sight Reading II (2) 

MUSC 327 Choral Conducting (3) 

or 

.MUSC 329 Instrumental Conducting (3) 

.VIUSC 335 Choral and Instrumental Arranging (3) 

MUSC 405 Western Music from 1914 to the Present (3) 

MUSC 414 Counterpoint (3) 

MUSC 419 Keyboard Literature (3) 

.MUSC 460 Piano Pedagogy (3) 

MUSC xxx Upper-division MUSC electives (9) 



KEYBOARD PERFORMANCE CONCENTRATION 
REQUIREMENTS (Pipe Organ) (81 units) 

MUSA xxx Private pipe organ lessons (16) 

MUSA xxx Private piano lessons (2) 

MUSA xxx Ensembles — six terms in choral ensembles, one in any 

other ensemble (7) 

MUSC 399 Junior Recital (1) 

MUSA 499 Senior Recital ( 1 ) 

MUED210 Voice Class (1) 

MUSC 131 Theory I (2) 

MUSC 132 Theory 11 (2) 

MUSC 133 Musicianship I (2) 

MUSC 134 Musicianship II (2) 

MUSC 201 Music in the U.S.; Analytic Emphasis (3) 

MUSC 231 Theory III (2) 

MUSC 232 Theory IV (2) 

MUSC 233 Musicianship III (2) 

MUSC 234 Musicianship IV (2) 

MUSC 301 Western Music to 1750 (3) 

MUSC 302 Western Music from 1750-1914 (3) 

MUSC 313 Keyboard Harmony and Sight Reading I (2) 

MUSC 314 Keyboard Harmony and Sight Reading 11 (2) 

MUSC 327 Choral Conducting (3) 

or 

MUSC 329 Instrumental Conducting (3) 

MUSC 335 Choral and Instrumental Arranging (3) 

MUSC 405 Western Music from 1914 to the Present (3) 

MUSC 414 Counterpoint (3) 

MUSC 419 Keyboard Literature (3) 

MUSC xxx Upper-division MUSC electives (9) 

VOICE PERFORMANCE CONCENTRATION 
REQUIREMENTS (83 units) 

MUSA xxx Private voice lessons (16) 

MUSA xxx Ensembles — 4 units in Chorale or Choral Society, 4 units in 
Music for the Stage, and 4 units in any vocal ensemble (12) 

MUSA 190 Piano Class (1) 

MUSA 191 Piano Class 11(1) 

MUSA 290 Piano Class HI (1) 

MUSA 399 Junior Recital (1) 

MUSA 499 Senior Recital ( 1 ) 

MUSC 131 Theory I (2) 

MUSC 132 Theory II (2) 

MUSC 133 Musicianship I (2) 

MUSC 134 Musicianship II (2) 

MUSC 201 Music in the U.S.; Analytic Emphasis (3) 

MUSC 23 1 Theory III (2) 

MUSC 232 Theory IV (2) 

MUSC 233 Musicianship III (2) 

MUSC 234 Musicianship IV (2) 

MUSC 245 Diction for Singers I (English and Italian) (2) 

MUSC 246 Diction for Singers II (French and German) (2) 

MUSC 301 Western Music to 1750 (3) 

MUSC 302 Western Music from 1750-1914 (3) 

MUSC 327 Choral Conducting (3) 

MUSC 405 Western Music from 1914 to the Present (3) 

MUSC 406 Survey of Solo Voice Literature (3) 

MUSC 442 Vocal Pedagogy (3) 

MUSC xxx Upper-division .MUSC electives (9) 
Intermediate level in German, French or Italian (12) 

WINDS, STRINGS, PERCUSSION PERFORMANCE 

CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS (84 units) 

MUSA xxx Private lessons in one instrument or percussion area (16) 

MUSA xxx Ensembles — eight terms In either Symphonic Band or 

Orchestra; eight terms of other instrumental ensembles 

(16) 
MUSA 190 Piano Class 1(1) 
MUSA 191 Piano Class 11(1) 
MUSA 290 Piano Class III (1) 
MUSA 399 Junior Recital (1) 
MUSA 499 Senior Recital (1) 
MUSC 131 Theory I (2) 
MUSC 132 Theory II (2) 
MUSC 133 Musicianship I (2) 
MUSC 134 Musicianship II (2) 



118 



The College of Fine Arts and Communication 



MUSC 201 Music in the U.S.; Analytic Emphasis (3) 

MUSC231 Theory III (2) 

MUSC 232 Theory IV (2) 

MUSC 233 Musicianship III (2) 

MUSC 234 Musicianship IV (2) 

MUSC 301 Western Music to 1750 (3) 

MUSC 302 Western Music from 1750-1914 (3) 

MUSC 305 Survey of the Music Industry (3) 

MUSC 329 Instrumental Conducting (3) 

MUSC 335 Choral and Instrumental Arranging (3) 

MUSC 405 Western Music from 1914 to the Present (3) 

MUSC 443 Instrumental Pedagogy ( 1 ) 

MUSC .x.xx Upper-division MUSC clectives (9) 

MAJOR IN MUSIC — BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
DEGREE 

The Bachelor of Science in Music is designed for students seeking 
a liberal arts degree in music. The curriculum of this program is 
designed to assure that students receive a solid grounding in the 
fundamentals of music theory and history, take individual instruc- 
tion in applied music, and will participate in musical ensembles 
appropriate to their area of musical training. The Department of 
Music strongly recommends the completion of the intermediate 
level of a foreign language. Students are encouraged to pursue a 
minor in a related or complementary field of study. 

All students pursuing the Bachelor of Science degree in Music 
must take one course in one of the arts outside of music (visual 
arts, theater, or dance) either within their General Education units 
or within their 30 elective units. 

Students must also undertake one of the following 3-unit cap- 
stone experiences demonstrating mastery of some area of their 
study. Selection of this capstone experience will be made through 
the student's adviser and must be approved by the department 
chairperson. 

Music Performance and Senior Recital 

Students who choose music performance as their principal area of 
competency must complete at least 2 units of applied music at the 
upper-division level and complete the 1-unit course MUSA 497 
(Senior Recital for Bachelor of Science in Music Degree). (Students 
must be enrolled for applied lessons concurrently with Senior 
Recital.) 

Senior Thesis/Project 

Students may choose to write a senior thesis under the direction of 
a faculty adviser. These candidates must successfully complete 
MUSC 493 Independent Research in Music. 

Music Internship 

Students who pursue training in a cognate area such as music busi- 
ness, arts administration, or some other appropriate professional 
field must demonstrate competence in that field through the suc- 
cessful completion of MUSC 497 Internship in Music. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Total minimum units to complete the major in Music - 
Bachelor of Science degree are 120. 

Music Requirements (31 units) 

MUSC 131 Theory I (2) 

MUSC 132 Theory II (2) 

MUSC 133 Musicianship I (2) 

MUSC 134 Musicianship II (2) 

MUSC 201 Music in the U.S.; Analytic Emphasis (3) 

MUSC 231 Theory III (2) 

MUSC 301 Western Music to 1750 (3) 

MUSC 302 Western Music from 1750-1914 (3) 

MUSC 421 Music in the U.S. (3) 



MUSC 426 Jazz History (3) 

or 
MUSC 471 Special Topics in World Music (3) 
MUSC XXX Upper-division MUSC electives (6) 

Applied and Music Elective Requirements (20 units) 

MUSA XXX Private Lessons (6) 

MUSA XXX Ensembles (4) 

MUSA 190 Piano Class 1(1) 

MUSC, MUSA (ensembles only), or MUED electives (6) 

MUSC or MUSA Capstone Experience (3) 

General Education requirements (38-40 units) and free electives (no 
MUSC, MUED or MUSA courses) (30-32 units) (combined— 69 
units minimum) 

MINOR IN MUSIC 

The Music minor, available for students who desire to pursue music 
studies as a secondary field, requires 24-25 units. Music minors are 
required to have a department adviser to assist with building mean- 
ingful schedules. The minor consists of two tracks: Music 
Performance and Music Literature. Students who intend to minor 
in Music are advised to so declare in their freshman year. 
Acceptance to the Performance Track is by prior audition only. 
Students accepted into this track must discuss with their applied 
teacher how they will logically progress to the final recital. Students 
in the Literature Track must apply to the department and complete 
all lower-division requirements before moving to upper-division 
courses. MUSC 131 and MUSC 133 must be taken concurrently. 

Students must attain a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher for 
courses applied to the minor. The Pass grading option is not avail- 
able for courses applied to the minor. 

Performance Track (24-25 units) 

MUSA XXX Private lessons in one discipline (at least two at the upper- 
division level) (8) 

MUSA XXX Ensembles (3) 

MUSA 399 Junior Recital (1) 

MUSC 101 Introduction to Music of the Western Heritage (3) 
or 

MUSC 106 Honors Introduction to Music of the Western Heritage (3) 

MUSC 105 Music Theory for Non-Ma|ors (3) 
or 

MUSC 131 Theory I (2) 

and m 

MUSC 133 Musicianship I (2) (must be taken concurrently with ■ 

MUSC 131) ■ 

MUSC 201 Music in the U.S.; Analytic Emphasis (3) 

MUSC 305 Survey of the Music Industry (3) 



Literature Track (25 units) 

MUSC 131 Theory I (2) 

anj 
MUSC 133 Musicianship I (2) (must be taken concurrently with 

MUSC 131) 
MUSC 132 Theory II (2) 
MUSC 101 Introduction to Music of the Western Heritage (3) 

or 
MUSC 106 Honors Introduction to Music of the Western Heritage (3) 
MUSC 201 Music in the U.S.; Analytic Emphasis (3) 

One course selected from the following (3): 

MUSC 110 Honors Introduction to World Music (3) 

MUSC 1 12 World Music: The Americas, Africa and West Europe (3) 

MUSC 113 World Music: East Europe, Asia and the Middle East (3) 

One course selected from the follouiing (?): 
MUSC 123 Jazz History for Non-Majors (3) 
MUSC 125 Honors Jazz History for Non-Majors (3) 
MUSC 127 Elements and History of Rock Music (3) 
MUSC 205 Women in Western Music (3) 



i 



Department of Theatre Arts 



119 



upper-division etectives selected from the following 

(one from each group) (6): 

Group I 

MUSC301 Western Music to 1750 (3) 

MUSC 402 Music of the Baroque Period (3) 

MUSC 403 Music of the Classical Period (3) 

MUSC 404 Music of the Romantic Period (3) 

Group II 

MUSC 406 Survey of Vocal Literature (3) 

MUSC 411 Survey of Opera (3) 

MUSC 413 Symphonic Literature (3) 

MUSC 42 1 Music m the U.S. (3) 

MUSC 426 Jazz Historv (3) 

MUSC 471-479 Special Topics (3) 

MUSC 493 Independent Research in Music (written paper) (1) 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

The department also offers courses for non-Music majors. These 
courses are primarily taken to satisfy GenEd requirements and 
include the following: 
MUSC 100 

MUSC 101 

MUSC 105 
MUSC 106 

MUSC 110 
MUSC 1 1 1 
MUSC 112 

MUSC 113 

MUSC 114 
MUSC 123 
MUSC 125 
MUSC 127 
MUSC 201 
MUSC 205 



Using Information Effectively in Music 
(GenEd l.B) (3) 

Introduction to Music of the Western Heritage 
(GenEdII.C.l)(3) 

Music Theory for Non-Majors (GenEd II. C.I) (3) 
Honors Introduction to Music of the Western Heritage 
(GenEd II.C.l) (3) 

Honors World Music (GenEd II.D) (3) 
Introduction to Music in the U.S. (GenEd II.B.l) (3) 
World Music: The Americas, Africa and West Europe 
(GenEd II.D) (3) 

World Music: East Europe, Asia and the Middle East 
(GenEd II.D) (3) 

Music Technology in American Society (GenEd II.B.2) (3) 
Jazz History for Non-Majors (GenEd II.B.l) (3) 
Honors Jazz History for Non-Majors (GenEd II.B.l) (3) 
Elements and History of Rock Music (GenEd II.B.l) (3) 
Music in the U.S.; Analytic Emphasis (GenEd II.B.l) (3) 
Women in Western Music (GenEd II. C. 3) (3) 



PERFORMING ENSEMBLES 

Non-Music majors/minors are encouraged to audition for per- 
forming ensembles at the beginning of each term. A complete list 
of ensemble offerings can be found under Course Descriptions for 
"Music Applied (MUSA) - Ensembles" in this catalog. (No audi- 
tion IS required for MUSA 150/350 Choral Society, MUSA 160/360 
Marching Band or MUSA 170/370 World Music Ensemble.) For 
further information, contact the department at 410-704-2836. 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 

The Department of Music offers two graduate degrees: a Master of 
Science in Music Education and a Master of Music in either 
Performance or Composition. A Certificate of Music is also 
offered. A Certificate in Music: Dalcroze-Orff-Kodaly emphasis 
may be completed during summer sessions. 

Other areas of emphasis may involve the fall, spring and 
Minimester terms. Entrance requirements and programs of study 
are available from the department's graduate program directors 
and are outlined in the Graduate Catalog. 



Department of Theatre Arts 

Professors: Georgi, Baker, Thomas Cascella, Juanita Rockwell 
Associate Professors: Tom Casciero, Daniel Ettinger, Jay Herzog 

(Chair), Robyn Quick, Diane Smith-Sadak 
Assistattt Professors: Naoko Maeshiba, Steve Satta, Peter Wray 
Adjunct Faculty: Steve Bauer, Marsha Becker, Harvey Doster, 

Donna Fox, Margaret Penniman, Susan Rotkovitz, Barry 

Smith, Marianne Wittelsberger, Steve Yeager 
Adjunct Professor: Philip Arnoult 
Distinguished Visiting Professor of Acting: John Glover 
Administrative Assistants: Melissa Crook, Allison Murray 
Production Directors: Mark Gardner, Julie Gerhardt, Cheryl 

Partridge, Anthony Rosas 

OFFICE 

Center for the Arts 3037, 410-704-2792 or 410-704-2793 

Fax: 410-704-3914 

www.towson.edu/theatre 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The guiding principle of the Department of Theatre Arts is that our 
energies and resources remain devoted to the development of our 
students as creative, cooperative and humanistically educated the- 
atre practitioners. We strive to give our students maximum oppor- 
tunity to use our theatres, shops and studios to develop their craft. 

The undergraduate program is intentionally eclectic, including in 
its productions as many forms and styles of theatre as possible. The 
graduate program is specifically focused on the creation of original 
works that explore interdisciplinary and intercultural techniques. 

During the academic year, the Department of Theatre Arts offers 
the campus and community a full season of plays in its three the- 
atres. The department maintains a policy of casting only under- 
graduate student actors in undergraduate productions. 

Specific goals of the undergraduate program are: 

• to educate the whole person through the study of theatre as an 
academic and artistic discipline within the context of liberal 
arts 

• to prepare students for the rigors and demands of professional 
theatre while also supporting theatre training for students with 
alternative career aspirations 

• to provide an ongoing mentoring relationship between faculty 
and students designed to nurture a student's unique artistic 
voice and passionate point of view 

• to foster an appreciation of social, cultural and aesthetic diver- 
sity via academic and artistic opportunities 

Specific goals of the graduate program are: 

• to prepare the artist as a producer of original works, either 
solo or in small ensembles, who will shape the theatre of the 
future 

• to explore the definition of theatre through interdisciplinary 
and intercultural studies and experimentation 

• to maintain significant participation in the international dis- 
cussion of new theatre forms and pedagogies 

Both programs are committed to interdisciplinary collaborations 
within the university and in the community. Both strive to maintain 
and enhance their reputations through active participation in 
regional, national and international organizations. 

Theatre majors receive either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of 
Science degree in Theatre. Majors must complete one of three 
tracks: Acting, Design and Production, or Theatre Studies. Students 
may also minor in Theatre, or double major in another field. All 
students are assigned advisers in the appropriate areas. The theatre 
program is time consuming and physically demanding, often 
requiring participation in evening and weekend activities. Students 
considering a career in the theatre should recognize that the field is 
extremely competitive. The Department of Theatre Arts strives to 



120 



The College of Fine Arts and Communication 



prepare its students for the challenges of professional theatre and 
encourages versatility' through a sound liberal arts education. All 
degree programs in Theatre are fully accredited by the National 
Association of Schools of Theatre. 

MAJOR IN THEATRE 

Theatre majors must complete: 46 units in theatre (at least 18 units 

at the 300-400 level), 31 units of required courses and 15 elective 
units in one of the three tracks. 

Majors should work with a faculty adviser to select courses in 
their track. Students must attain a grade equivalent of 2.00 or high- 
er in courses applied to the major. The Pass grading option is not 
available for courses applied to the major. Students are expected to 
take lower-division prerequisites before attempting the required 
upper-division electives. 

TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

Transfer students majoring in Theatre are required to complete a 
minimum of 20 credits of theatre courses at Towson Universit)', 
with at least 12 credits at the upper (300-400) level. Majors need 
a total of 18 upper-level theatre credits, including transfer courses. 

Transfer students minoring in Theatre must complete at least 12 
credits of theatre courses at Towson University, with at least 6 at 
the upper level. Minors need a total of 12 upper-level theatre credits, 
including transfer courses. 

Applicability of transfer work is determined by the department 
chair. Prospective transfer students should schedule an appoint- 
ment with the chair at their earliest opportunity. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL MAJORS 

Theatre Courses (31 units) 

THEA 1 10 Acting 1 for Majors (3) 

THEA 125 Script Analysis (3) 

THE.\ 142 Introduction to Theatre Design (3) 

THEA 2 1 1 History of Theatre and Drama 1(3) 

THEA 212 History of Theatre and Drama II (3) 

THEA 2 1 3 History of Theatre and Drama III (3) 

THEA 201 Scene Design 1(3) 

or 
THEA 255 Lighting Design I (3) 

or 
THEA 353 Costume Design I (3) 
THEA 331 Directing I (3) 

THE.\ 494 Theatre Production: Scenic Elements (1) 
THE.\ 495 Theatre Production: Lighting, Sound (1) 
THEA 496 Theatre Production: Costume (1) 
THEA 497 Theatre Production: Running Crew (1) 
THEA 499 Special Project m Theatre Research (3) 

ACTING TRACK (15 units) 

The Acting Track is for students who are seeking rigorous prepa- 
ration for graduate study or for entry-level opportunities in the act- 
ing profession. Although a competitive audition is not required for 
admission, screening occurs within the first two years of the pro- 
gram. Students may be asked to repeat courses or to take acting 
elective courses before advancing to the next level. A minimum of 
15 units is required to complete the track. Most students elect to 
take more than the minimum. 

Required Courses (15 units) 

\H\-.\ 105 Movement for the Actor (3) 

PHt.A 1 1 1 Voice for the Actor I (3) 

THEA 202 Actmg II (3) 
TH EA 322 Voice for the Actor II (3) 
THEA 335 Impulse Improvisation (3) 



Electives 

THEA 205 Theatre Games (3) 

THE.-\ 23 1 Mime and Physical Theatre Techniques (3) 

THEA 245 Makeup Design I (3) 

THEA 246 Makeup Design II (3) 

THEA 26 1 Acting for Musical Theatre 1 (3) 

THEA 262 Acting for Musical Theatre II (3) 

THEA 301 Techniques of Comedy (3) 

THE.\ 302 Intermediate Scene Study (3) 

THEA 308 Voice and Movement Integration (3) 

THEA 309 Acting III (6) 

THEA 312 Shakespeare (3) 

THEA 315 Advanced Scene Study (3) 

THEA 332 Mime and Physical Theatre Styles (3) 

THE.^ 423 Advanced Study in Movement Theatre (1-9) 

THE.A 425 Advanced Study in Acting Style (1-9) 

THEA 487 Professional Theatre Seminar ( 1-12) 

THE.\ 489 Senior Acting Seminar (3) 

THEA 493 Advanced Study in Theatre (1-9) 

Credit for Performance 

Students cast in theatre productions sponsored by the Department 
of Theatre .^rts may earn up to 3 units per show by enrolling in 
THEA 490 Performance Practicum. The number of units allowed 
per role is determined by the director of the production. Eligible 
productions are determined by the department. Students may earn 
a maximum of 9 units of THEA 490. 

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION TRACK (15 units) 

The Design and Production Track also prepares students for grad- 
uate study and/or entry into the theatre professions. Faculrv' mentors 
guide qualified students through design and production projects of 
increasing responsibilit)', culminating in mainstage designs and 
leadership production positions for the most advanced students. 
The Design and Production Track has an excellent record of intern- 
ship and career placements. 

Required Courses (12 units) 

THEA 201 Scenic Design I (3) 
THEA 251 Stagecraft I (3) 
THEA 255 Lighnng Design I (3) 
THEA 353 Costume Design 1 (3) 
One of the following (J units) 
THEA 351 Stagecraft II (3) 
THEA 355 Lighting Design II (3) 
THEA 361 Scenic Design II (3) 
THEA 453 Costume Design II (3) 

Electives 

THE.A 107 Property Design and Construction (3) 

THEA 209 Sound Design (3) 

THEA 241 Costume, Dress and Society: Egyptian to Elizabethan (3) 

THEA 242 Costume, Dress and Socier\-: Elizabethan to 1950 (3) 

THEA 245 Makeup Design 1(3) 

THEA 246 Makeup Design II (3) 

THE.\ 257 Stage Man,igement (3) 

THE.'X 433 Advanced Study in Stage Management (1-9) 

THEA 443 Structural Design and Safety (3) 

THEA 445 Scene Painting (3) 

THEA 463 Period Styles for Design (3) 

THEA 480 Advanced Study in Theatre Design (1-9) 

THEA 487 Professional Theatre Seminar (1-12) 

THEATRE STUDIES TRACK (15 units) 

The Theatre Studies Track serves two tv'pes of Theatre majors: 1) 
those who wish to design their own programs of study within the 
department and 2) those who wish to specialize in areas of theatre 
studies that are not fully developed in the department (directing, 
movement theatre, musical theatre, stage management, theatre arts 
administration). In addition to the standard requirements for all 
Theatre majors, students in the Theatre Studies Track will select at 
least 15 elective units with the supervision of a theatre faculty 
adviser. 



Department of Theatre Arts 



121 



Directing 

Students who have successfully completed Script Analysis and 
Directing I and who have stage-managed a faculty-directed pro- 
duction may propose to direct a Studio Project under the supervi- 
sion of a faculr\' member. 

Dramaturgy 

The department provides students with the opportunit\- to serve as 
production dramaturgs on mainstage shows. Working individually 
or in teams, students help to analyze the script, provide research to 
the production team and create outreach projects for audience 
members. 

Movement Theatre 

There are opportunities for majors to explore movement theatre in 
depth. 

Stage Management 

Students interested in stage management have excellent opportuni- 
ties to stage-manage studio and then mainstage productions. The 
stage managing course is offered every fall. 

Theatre Arts Administration 

Students interested in box office, house managing, publicity and 
other aspects of theatre administration have the opportunity to 
gain work experience through independent study and paid posi- 
tions in the College of Fine Arts and Communication. Internships 
with local theatres are available. Students with this interest often 
complete a Business Administration minor. There are no courses in 
theatre administration in the department. 

Musical Theatre 

The Department of Theatre .\rts produces a mainstage musical 
once ever}' two years. Some students may take private voice lessons 
with the Department of Music, and dance classes with the 
Department of Dance. 

MINOR IN THEATRE 

The Theatre minor requires students to take 26 units in theatre. At 
least 12 of these units must be at the upper division (300 and 
above). 

Required Courses (8 units) 

One Acnng Course (3) 

One Design and Produaion Course (3) 

Two of the following courses: 

THE.'\ 494 Theatre Production: Scenic Elements (1); 

THEA 495 Theatre Production: Lighting or Sound (1); 

THEA 496 Theatre Production: Costume (1) 

THE.\ 497 Theatre Production: Running Crew (1). 

Electives (18 units) 

Students are encouraged to pursue an area of study within one of 
the department's tracks (Aaing, Design and Production, or Theatre 
Studies) under the supervision of an adviset 



MEETING GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

The Department of Theatre Arts offers courses designed for stu- 
dents who are not majors or minors. These courses are primarily 
taken to satisfy General Education requirements. Please see the 
GenEd Requirements in the University Curriculum section of this 
catalog. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Career opportunities in theatre include professional acting, direct- 
ing, technical theatre, costume, makeup, light and set design, stage 
managing, theatre management and administration. Theatre alum- 
ni have also found careers in related areas such as clothing design, 
computer-aided design, casting agencies, business management, 
personnel work, promotional agencies, film and television. Many 
of our graduates go on to graduate school in theatre, either in 
preparation for professional theatre careers or college teaching. 
Towson Universitv' does not currently offer a program in theatre 
education. Students wishing to teach drama in high school should 
major in one of Towson's accredited secondary education subjects 
(such as English) and should pursue a minor in Theatre. It is also 
possible, with careful scheduling, to double major in Theatre and a 
secondary education program in another major. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

A limited number of scholarships are available for continuing stu- 
dents. These include named scholarships such as the Askew, the 
Charles S. Dutton, the Gillespie/Loeschke, the John Glover, the 
Audrey Herman, the Nina Hughes, the Walter F. Kramme, the 
Christopher Legg, and the Steve Yeager scholarships. 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 

The Master of Fine Arts in Theatre at Towson University is an 
experimental, self-directed graduate program designed to chal- 
lenge, expand and develop participants' artistic vision. Focusing on 
original solo and ensemble work, it aims to reconstruct a theatre 
suited to the challenges of the 21st century. Our curriculum 
includes residencies and workshops by nationally and internation- 
ally recognized guest artists and encourages its students to collabo- 
rate on interdisciplinary and cross-cultural projects. For more 
information, see the TU Graduate Catalog, call 410-704-3851 or 
visit www.towson.edu/theatre/grad. 




\ ^ f 



i 





The College of Health Professions 



The College of Health Professions enrolls more bachelor's and master s health care and 
sport-related professional students than any other institution in the state of Maryland and has 
one of the largest enrollments in the mid-Atlantic region. Our mission is to provide the high- 
est quality of undergraduate and graduate learning experiences in a wide range ofliealth care 
and sport-related professions that promote and enhance health and human performance. 
Graduates e.xhihit the highest ethical principles and professional behaviors in the application 
of knowledge and critical thinking, the proficient use of skills, the effective use of communica- 
tion and the meaningful use of technology. 

As a college, we emphasize the key values of: 

■ E.xcellence 

■ Ethical and moral conduct 

■ Collaboration 

■ Promotion of wellness across the life span 

■ Worth and dignity of all people 

■ Lifelong learning 

The programs in the college prepare graduates to assume ivies in a variety of clinical, 
teaching, community and sport-related settings. Each program integrates this professional 
preparation with a rigorous grounding in the liberal arts and sciences. Faculty members sup- 
port students ' development to assure that graduates possess the knowledge, attitudes and skills 
necessary for career success. Internships and clinical experiences arc an essential part of 
each student 's education. 

Programs in the college are accredited by appropriate professional and educational 
accrediting agencies. Graduates of the baccalaureate programs of Athletic Training. Nursing 
and Occupational Therapy are eligible to sit for their respective licensure or certification 
examinations. In addition to providing courses for students majoring in each of the depart- 
ments, each department provides courses that are available to all Tow.son University students. 

Charlotte E. Exner, Dean 
Raymond A. Stinar, Associate Dean 



Allied Health 

Athletic Training 

Chemical Dependency Counseling and 

Education 
Deaf Studies 
Exercise Science 
Health Care Management 
Health Science 

Community Health 

School and Community Health Education 

School Health - Teacher Education 
Nursing 

Occupational Therapy 
Physical Education - Teacher Education 
Pre-Medical Technology 
Speech-Language Pathology and Audioiogy 
Sport Management 
Sport Studies 

Optimizing Wellness For Life 



COLLEGE OFRCE 

Towson Center 337, 410-704-2132 

Fax: 410-704-3479 



Allied Health Program 



123 



Allied Health Program 

Program Director: Marcie Weinstein (Collaborative Programs) 

OFFICE 

Enrollment Services Center 325, 410-704-4049 
www.towson.edu/chp/htps 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Bachelor of Technical/Professional Studies (B.T.P.S.) degree 
program in Allied Health at Towson University is designed for 
graduates of a variety of health-related associate degree programs 
at community colleges in Niaryland. Appropriate disciplines 
include: 

Cardiovascular technology 

Clinical laboratory technician 

Dental hygienist 

Diagnostic medical sonographer 

Dietetic technician 

Emergency medical technician-paramedic 

Health information technician 

Massage therapist 

Medical assistant 

Nuclear medicine technologist 

Occupational therapy assistant 

Physician 

Physical therapist assistant 

Radiographer 

Radiation therapy technician 

Respiratory therapist 

Surgical technologist 

Veterinary technologist 

The B.TP.S. in .Allied Health Program allows students to use credits 
earned in their .A.A.S. programs toward a professionally relevant 
baccalaureate degree. The maximum number of community college 
credits that may be applied to the program is 64. Applicants must 
meet the admission requirements of Towson University. 

Program Objectives 

The B.T.P.S. in Allied Health degree program is designed to prepare 
students to: 

• assume managerial, supervisory and/or clinical education roles 
within their respective areas of health practice 

• enhance their use of ethically grounded and culturally sensitive 
practices in their administration and delivery of health services 

• effectively use technology and scientific inquiry to support and 
guide their roles as health practitioners and administrators 

• understand, evaluate and influence societal, economic and polit- 
ical forces that impact health practices at the individual, regional 
and national levels 

• communicate effectively with clients, colleagues, agencies and 
the community in their roles as health practitioners and admin- 
istrators 

Program Requirements 

The Bachelor of Technical/Professional Studies in Allied Health 
degree program requires the completion of a minimum of 120 
units. Lower-division courses from associate degree programs will 
be applied, as appropriate, up to a maximum of 64 units. A mini- 
mum of 32 units must be in upper-division courses at Towson 
University. The overall program structure follows: 

General Education Requirements 

Students must complete Towson University's General Education 
requirements as specified in this catalog. In general, a graduate 
from one of the .Maryland community college associate degree pro- 
grams included m the B.T.P.S. in Allied Health Program will need 



to complete 20 to 24 units of General Education courses in addi- 
tion to those that are transferred. Some of the required General 
Education courses will be satisfied through program core and focus 
area requirements. 

Core Requirements 

All students are required to complete 18 units of core courses in the 

program. 

One course (i units) must he completed iii each of the following arejs: 

Administration: 

HCMN 305 Community Health .administration (3) 

■MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 

MKTG 341 Principles of .Marketing (3) 



Ethics: 

HCMN 417 
HCMN 441 
PHIL 361 
PHIL 371 



Long-Term Care Ethical Problems (3) 

Legal and Ethical Issues in Health Administration (3) 

Ethics of Medicine and Life Sciences (3) 

Business Ethics (3) 



Health Care Systems: 

HLTH 207 Health Care in the U.S. (3) 

HLTH 217 Honors Health Care in the U.S. (3) 

NURS 404 Health Care: .\n Interdisciplinary Approach (3) 

Cultural Competency: 

NURS 4 1 6 Multicultural Health Care (3) 
COMM 378 Intercultural Communication (3) 



Research: 
IDHP XXX 
PSYC3I4 
FMST 485 



Research Methods in Psychology (3) 
Research Methods in Family Studies (3) 



Technology and Professional Issues: 

IDHP 4xx.' 

Focus Area 

Students choose one of five focus areas; a minimum of 15 units 
must be completed in a focus area. Prerequisite courses must be 
completed for courses chosen to be included in the focus area. 
Although a great deal of flexibility and a number of options are 
permitted within a focus area, the student must provide a rationale 
and take a cohesive set of courses related to that rationale for the 
focus area. All courses and each student's program of study must 
be approved by the B.T.P.S. in Allied Health program director. 
Below are descriptions and suggested courses for each focus area. 

Administration 

Students may choose from a broad array of courses in the fields of 
healthcare management, accounting, management, marketing, 
finance and related areas. 

CoKrst' possihihties include: 

HCMN 305 Community Health Administration (3) 

HCMN 413 Services and Housing for the Long-Term Care Consumer (3) 

HCMN 415 Financing and Organiz.ition of Health Care Services in 

the U.S. (3) 
HCMN 4)7 Long-Term Care Ethical Problems (3) 
HCMN 419 Long-Term Care Administration (3) 
HCMN 441 Legal and Ethical Issues in Health Administration (3) 
ECON 339 Health Problems (3) 
MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 
MKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (3) 



124 



The College of Health Professions 



Education 

Courses in health education or other areas of education may be 
selected to focus on patient education or teaching. 

Course possibilities include: 

HLTH 311 Chronic and Communicable Disease (3) 

HLTH 315 Curriculum and Planning in Health Education (3) 

HLTH 425 Instructional Methods in Health Education (3) 

HLTH 430 Organization, Implementation and Management of 

Health Education Programs (3) 
HLTH 432 Measurement and Evaluation in Health Education (3) 

Wellness, Prevention and Community Health Education 

Appropriate courses in health science, kinesiology, occupational 
therapy and other departments may be selected. 

Course possibilities include: 

OCTH 205 Alternative and Complimentary Health Care (3) 

OCTH 301 Genetics, Health and Society (3) 

HLTH 311 Chronic and Communicable Disease (3) 

HLTH 331 Nutrition for Health Professionals (3) 

HLTH 402 Health and Social Welfare Promotion: Health 

Communication (3) 
KNES 301 Introduction to Recreation and Leisure (3) 

KNES 455 Physical Activit)- Programming for the Older Adult (3) 

Family Studies: Family studies is an interdisciplinary area that 
includes courses from the Family Studies (FMST) Program as well 
as a variety of courses from other departments in the university. 

Course possibilities include: 

FMST 301 Family Relationships (3) 

F.MST 302 Theories of Family Functioning (3) 

FMST 303 Trends in Contemporary Family Life (3) 

FMST 380 Family Law (3) 

F.VIST 387 Communit}' Service for Families (3) 

SOCI 367 Sociologv of Death, Dving and Bereavement (3) 

PSYC 405 The Psychology of Aging (3) 

PSYC 451 Introduction to the Exceptional Child (3) 

Science and Professional Preparation: Students interested in pursu- 
ing graduate study in a health profession or science-related area 
may wish to use the focus area to complete additional course work 
in the natural sciences, mathematics and related areas that may be 
required for graduate school or professional school preparation. 

Course possibilities include: 

BIOL 301 Field Natural Science (4) 

BIOL 303 Life Sciences (3) 

BIOL 321 Biology of Women (3) 

BIOL 322 Biotechnology and Society (3) 

BIOL 323 Genes, Evolution and .Morality (3) 

Faculty 

The B.T.P.S. in Allied Health Program draws on the expertise of 
faculty members from several departments within the universit)'. 

Fiu'ther Information 

For further information concerning the Bachelor of Technical/ 
Professional Studies in Allied Health Program, including specifics 
on how course work completed at community colleges 
will apply toward the program, please contact Marcie Weinstein 
at Towson Universit)^ by phone, 410-704-4049, or e-mail, 
mweinstein@towst)n.edu. 



Department of Audiology, 
Speech-Language Pathology 
and Deaf Studies 

Professor: M. Barbara Laufer (Chair) 

Associate Professors: Diana Emanuel, Sharon Glennen, 

Eva Hester 
Assistant Professors: Celia Bassich, Sheryl Cooper, Gerianne 

Gilligan, Peggy Korczak, Mark Pellowski 
Clinical Assistant Professors: lona Johnson, Stephen Pallen 
Clinical Administrators: Karen Pottash, Bette Stevens 
Lecturers: Donna Coons, Karen Helmuth-Day, Kim Pudans-Smith 

OFFICE 

Van Bokkelen Hall 105, 410-704-3099 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Audiology, Speech-Language Pathology and 
Deaf Studies offers a major in Speech-Language Pathology and 
Audiology and a major in Deaf Studies. These majors are broadly 
based in liberal arts and sciences with emphasis on information 
gathering, observation and the ability to evaluate information 
sources. At the undergraduate level, the programs emphasize infor- 
mation on the development and normal processes of communica- 
tion, as well as communication disorders. 

The undergraduate major in Speech-Language Pathology and 
Audiology prepares students for graduate study. The Master of 
Science degree program in Speech-Language Patholog)' and doctoral 
degree program in Audiology focus on specific communication dis- 
orders, their diagnoses and treatment. The graduate programs pre- 
pare students for national/state certification and state licensure, for 
clinical work in public and private schools, colleges and 
medical/paramedical institutions, and to pursue advanced degrees 
in the profession. For more information about the graduate pro- 
grams, see the Graduate Catalog. 

The Deaf Studies major offers students a broad-based liberal arts 
education and an opportunity for the holistic study of sign lan- 
guage and the people who use it. The program incorporates oppor- 
tunities to interact with professionals in the field and consumers 
who are deaf, as well as unique internship experiences in the 
Baltimore-Washington area. The major prepares graduates for 
entry-level positions in human services professions involving people 
who are deaf. Graduates also pursue careers in counseling, deaf 
education and interpreting, or graduate study in education, coun- 
seling or rehabilitation. 

In order to continue in and graduate with a department major, 
students are required to earn a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher 
in all required pre-major or major courses, in addition to attaining 
the overall cumulative GPA required by the university. Any student 
earning a grade equivalent below a 2.00 in any one major required 
course must petition the department for a special permit to repeat 
the course on a space-available basis. Those who earn a grade 
equivalent below a 2.00 in more than one major course are not 
allowed to continue in the program. 

The concept of "wellness" recognizes the importance of hearing, 
language and speech as core criteria for qualit)' of life. The ability 
to communicate is primary to normal child development and to the 
maintenance of physical, social, mental and spiritual health of an 
individual. The Department of Audiology, Speech-Language 
Pathology and Deaf Studies prepares professionals to provide pre- 
vention, diagnostic treatment and other support services to people 
of all ages, with the goal of helping individuals maintain and 
enhance their communicative competence throughout their life 
span. 



Department of Audiology, Speech-Language Pathology and Deaf Studies 



125 



SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY AND 
AUDIOLOGY PRE-MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

Enrollment in the Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology 
major is restricted as a function of the availabilit)' of clinical intern- 
ship experiences, clinical supen'isors, faculn,' and space. Each stu- 
dent must fulfill pre-major requirements before being considered 
for admission to the major These requirements include declaration 
of major in the department as a pre-major, completion of five 
required pre-major courses, and a speech, language, hearing and 
voice screening. 

Registration with the Department 

After gaining admission to the university, students interested in 
either Deaf Studies or Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology 
must contact the department in order to declare their major and to 
be assigned an academic adviser. 

Pre-Major Courses 

The following required courses must be completed before the stu- 
dent can be considered for advancement to major status. 
SPPA 101 Introduction to Human Communication and its 

Variations (3) 
SPPA 210 Phonetics of American English (3) 

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (or equivalent) (3) 

phis 

Students are also required to complete two out of the three course 
categories listed below before consideration for admission to the 
major. The third category course must be completed as a gradua- 
tion requirement. 

Categories: 

Biological Science (4): BIOL 1 10 or BIOL 201 

Physical Science (4-5): CHE.Vl 105, PHYS 202 

or PHYS 211 

Social/Behavioral Science (3): SOCI 101, ANTH 207/208 

or EDUC 203 

The GPA of each pre-major will be reviewed upon completion of 
five pre-major courses. Each candidate must have a minimum 
cumulative GPA of 2.50 on a 4.00 scale for all course work, and a 
2.80 in the five pre-major courses to be eligible for credentials eval- 
uation. If students have completed all three pre-major lab science 
and social/behavioral science courses, the two courses with the 
highest GP.A will be used for credentials evaluation. All eligible pre- 
majors are ranked by average of overall and pre-major GPA at the 
end of the spring term; a maximum of 50 are selected for fall 
admission to major status. Evaluation of credentials for advance- 
ment to major status occurs after spring term grades are posted, 
and students are notified of their status by certified mail no later 
than June 15. Once students are admitted to major status, the pro- 
gram will require a minimum of four terms to complete. The 
department maintains these high standards because students must 
obtain a graduate degree to practice speech-language pathology or 
audiologv', and admission to graduate school is primarily depend- 
ent on academic excellence in undergraduate course work. 

Speech, Language, Hearing and Voice Screening 

Students majoring in Deaf Studies or Speech-Language Patholog)' 
and Audiolog)- are expeaed to demonstrate proficiency in all areas 
of communication (reading, writing, oral and/or ASL) and in com- 
putational abilities. Students must have a hearing, language, speech 
and voice screening by clinically certified and licensed staff of the 
TU Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic. Students must arrange to be 
screened during their first year in the program. These screenings are 
offered by the department on specific, announced days during the 
first weeks of each term. Students exhibiting a communication dis- 
order or a dialect of English that is not easily understood will be 
encouraged to seek treatment/training. It is expected that such 
students will show improved oral communication abilin.' prior to 
enrolling in their first clinical internship course. If a pertinent 



medically based problem is suspected, a student may be required to 
obtain an otolaryngological examination and submit the written 
report to the department. Each student is given a copy of the 
department's screening policy upon declaration of pre-major or 
major. 

TRANSFER STUDENT POLICIES 

Transfer students who wish to major in Deaf Studies or Speech- 
Language Pathology and Audiology must declare their major with 
the department after they have been admitted to the university. 
Students should arrange for their speech, language, hearing and 
voice screening during their first year at Towson. Since screening 
for advancement to major status in Speech-Language Pathology 
and Audiology is only done at the end of the spring term, transfer 
students should be admitted to the university no later than that 
term. You may contact the department for additional information 
regarding the honors program for transfer students. 

Students must submit to the department an official transcript of 
any academic work pursued at institutions of higher learning. All 
transfer credits to be applied to the major must be approved by the 
department. Skills assessment for placement in any American Sign 
Language (ASL) course is required. SPPA 210 Phonetics must have 
been completed within the previous 10 years and all five pre-major 
courses must have been completed by the time of admission to the 
major 

Transfer students are required to take 20 units in residence of 
department courses in their major area. 

PREREQUISITE/SECOND BACHELOR'S PROGRAM 

Admission to the graduate program in either Speech-Language 
Pathology or Audiologv" for those without an undergraduate degree 
in Speech-Language Pathology or Audiology, requires matricula- 
tion in either a 33-unit accelerated prerequisite program or a 
49-unit Second Bachelor's Degree Program. The non-degree pro- 
gram is specific to application to our graduate program, whereas 
the Second Bachelor's Degree Program prepares students for appli- 
cation to any graduate program. Candidates for either option 
should contact the Office for Non-Traditional L'ndergradu.ite 
Programs, 410-~04-24~l. In order to register for classes you must 
first be officially admitted to the university, and then officially 
declare your major with the department. Failure to begin during a 
fall term will extend your program. For the Second Bachelor's 
Degree Program, course work cannot be completed in one year; 
only a limited number of students are selected from those who have 
applied by June 15 each year. The accelerated prerequisite program 
is an intensive one-year program for students having a GPA of 3.70 
or higher. Students must apply to the Graduate School by January IS 
and contact the graduate program director in Speech-Language 
Pathology, 410-704-2449. 

MAJOR IN SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY AND 
AUDIOLOGY 

In addition to General Education (GenEd) requirements, Speech- 
Language Patholog)' and Audiolog\' majors must complete 63 units 
in required speech-language pathology and audiology courses. 
However, 24 units of these 63 major required units are General 
Education (GenEd) Requirements*. A master's degree is the entr\- 
requirement for the professions of speech-language pathology and 
audiology at this time, and most graduate programs generally 
require a minimum GPA of 3.00 for admission consideration. As of 
2012, the entry requirement for audiology will be a doctoral 
degree. The Pass/Fail grading option may not be applied to any 
SPPA course or required major course. A criminal background 
check must be completed and on file prior to beginning practicum. 



126 



The College of Health Professions 



Pre-Major Sequence (16-18 units required) 

SPPA 101 Introduction to Human Communication and its 

Variations (3) 
SPPA 210 Phonetics of American English (3) 

PSYC 101 ' Introduction to Psychology (or equivalent) (3) 
plus 

Students are required to complete two out of three course cate- 
gories listed below before consideration for admission to the major. 
The third category course must be completed as a graduation 
requirement. 



Categories: 
'Biological Science (4): 
"Physical Science (4-5): 

'Social/Behavioral Science (3): 



BIOL 110 or BIOL 201 
CHEM 105, PHYS202 
or PHYS 211 

SOCI 101, ANTH 207/208, 
or EDUC 203 



Major (46-48 units required) 

SPPA 200 Anatomy and Physiology of the Auditory and Vocal 

Mechanism (3) 
SPPA 205- Basic Sign Language (3) 
SPPA 215 Language Development in Children (3) 

SPPA 302 Speech and Language Pathology 1: Phonology (3) 

SPPA 303 Hearing Science 13) 

SPPA 304 Speech and Language Pathology II: Language (3) 

SPPA 313 Speech Science (3) 

SPPA 321 Introduction to Audiology (3) 

SPPA 325 Introduction to Aural Rehabilitation (3) 

SPPA 416 Clinical Observations and Techniques (3) 

SPPA 417* Technical Writing in the Clinical Processes (3) 
PSYC 212' Behavioral Statistics (4) 
plus 
SPPA 306 Speech and Language Pathology III: Organic Disorders (3) 

or 
SPPA 341 Clinical Audiology (3) 

Electives (3 units of the 63 units required) 

SPPA 306 Speech and Language Pathology III: Organic Disorders 

(3) (only if SPPA 341 is completed) 
SPPA 341 Clinical Audiology (3) (only if SPPA 306 is completed) 

SPPA 487 Chnical Internship (3) 

SPPA 496 Independent Study in Speech-Language Pathology and 

Audiology (1-4) 
SPPA 497 Directed Readings in Speech-Language Pathology and 

Audiology (1-4) 
SPPA 498 Proctoring in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology (3) 

PSYC 205 Introduction to the Helping Relationship (3) 

ENGL 251 Applied Grammar (3) 

MAJOR IN DEAF STUDIES 

In addition to General Education (GenEd) requirements, Deaf 
Studies majors must complete 46-48 units in required program 
courses with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher, including 32 
units of upper-level course work inclusive of an Advanced 
Composition course (GenEd I.D). The major also requires a hearing, 
speech, language and voice screening and completion of a Criminal 
Background Disclosure Form. The Pass/Fail grading option may 
not be applied to any DFST/SPPA course or required major course. 
The maximum number of Credit for Prior Learning (CPL) units the 
department will accept is 15. The prerequisites for the capstone 
course DFST 410 Internship in Deaf Studies are: DFST 307, 310, 
345; major GPA of 2.50 or higher; completed communication 
screening; and/or consent of the department. A criminal back- 
ground check must be completed and on file prior to beginning 
internship. 

Required Courses (38-40 units) 

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) (GenEd II.B.2) 

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) (GenEd II.C.2) 

PSYC 205 Introduction to the Helping Relationship (3) 

SPPA 101 Introduction to Human Communication and its 

Variations (3) 



SPPA 205 Basic Sign Language (3) (GenEd II.B.3) 

DFST 206 American Sign Language I (3) 

DFST 307 American Sign Language II (3) 

DFST 310 Career Exploration in Deafness (3) 

DFST 31 1 Audition: Science and Social Impact (3) 

DFST 345 Psychosocial Aspects of Deafness (3) 

DFST 403 American Sign Language III (3) 

DFST 404 American Sign Language IV (3) 

DFST 410 Internship in Deafness (2-4) 

Electives (8 units) 

DFST 308 Fingerspelling (2) 

DFST 309 Introduction to Deafblindness (2) 

SPPA 496 Independent Study in SPPA (1-4) 

SPPA 497 Directed Readings in SPPA (1-4) 

SPPA 498 Proctoring (3) 

CLST 201 Introduction to Cultural Studies (3)* 

COMM 301 Nonverbal Communication (3) 

EDUC 301 Writing and Communication Skills for Teachers (3) 

(GenEd I.D) 

EDUC 407 Contemporary Issues in Education (3) 

ENGL 317 Writing for Business and Industry (3) 

ENGL 318 Advanced Informational Writing (3) 

PSYC 212 Behavioral Statistics (4) 

PSYC 203 Human Development (3) 

PSYC 305 Psychology of Learning (3) 

PSYC 315 Motivation (3) 

PSYC 325 Social Psychology (3) 

PSYC 350 Personalitv(3) 

PSYC 361 Abnormal Psychology (3) 

PSYC 403 Infant and Child Development (3) 

SOCI 301 The Family (3) 

SOCI 311 Individual and Society (3) 

SOCI 343 Minority Groups (3) 

SPED 301 Introduction to Special Education: K-12 (3) 

'Additional CLST courses would be acceptable 

SPPA/DFST DOUBLE MAJOR 

Entrance to the double major in Speech-Language Pathology and 
Audiology and Deaf Studies is restricted to those students who 
have been successfully advanced to major status from the pre-major 
sequence (PSPA). In addition to General Education requirements, 
students admitted to this option must complete 83-86 units with a 
grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. However, 24-25 units of these 
double major units are General Education requirements.* 

Pre-Major Sequence (16-18 units required) 

SPPA 101 Introduction to Human Communication and its 

Variations (3) 

Phonetics of American English (3) 
Introduction to Psychology (3) (GenEd II.C.2) 



SPPA 210 

PSYClOr 

plus 

Completion of two of the three categories listed below: (Third category 

course must be completed as a graduation requirement.) 

• Biological Science (4 units): 

BIOL 1 10 Contemporary General Biology (4) 

or 
BIOL 201 Biology I: Cellular Biology and Genetics (4) 

• Physical Science (4-5 units): 

CHEM 105 Chemistry for Allied Health Professions I (4) 

or 
PHYS 2 1 1 General Physics I (4) 

or 
PHYS 202 General Physics for the Health Sciences (5) 

• Social/Behavioral Science (3 units): 
SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) 



Department of Health Science 



127 



Major Required Courses (63-65 units) 

DFST 206 American Sign Language I (3) 

DFST 307 American Sign Language II (3) 

DFST 310 Career Exploration in Deafness (3) 

DFST 345 Psychosocial Aspects of Deafness (3) 

DFST 403 American Sign Language III (3) 

DFST 404 American Sign Language IV (3) 

DFST 410 Internship in Deafness (2-4) 

PSYC 205 Introduction to Helping Relationships (3) 

PSYC 212' Behavioral Statistics (4) (GenEd I.C) 

SPPA 200 Anatomy of Auditory and Vocal Mechanisms (3) 

SPPA 205' Basic Sign Language (3) (GenEd II.B.3) 

SPPA 215 Language Development in Children (3) 

SPPA 302 Speech Pathology I: Phonology (3) 

SPPA 303 Hearing Science (3) 

SPPA 304 Speech Pathology II: Language (3) 

SPPA 313 Speech Science (3) 

SPPA ill Introduction to Audiology (3) 

SPPA 325 Introduction to Aural Rehabilitation (3) 

SPPA 416 Observation and Techniques (3) 

SPPA 417' Technical Writing in Clinical Processes (3) (GenEd I.D) 

SPPA 306 Speech Pathology III: Organic Disorders (3) 

or 
SPPA 341 Clinical Audiology (3) 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Students are encouraged to participate in the campus chapter of the 
National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association. In addi- 
tion, Sign Up Club (sign language club) welcomes student 
participation. 




Department of Health Science 

Professors: Patricia Ait, Jack Osman, Susan Radius, (Graduate 

Program Director), Deitra Wengert 
Associate Professors: Daniel Agiey, Lillian Carter, Sharon 

Buchbinder (Coordinator, Health Care Management), Donna 

Cox {Coordinator, Chemical Dependency Counseling and 

Education), Hubert Nelson 
Assistant Professors: K. Todd King, Mia Ko 
Clinical Assistant Professor: Susan Hunter-Schultz 

OFFICE 

Burdick Hall 141, 410-704-2388 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The field of health science bridges the gap between scientific dis- 
coveries and the application of this knowledge to improve the qual- 
ity of service and life. The Department of Health Science offers the 
following areas of study: Health Science with concentrations in 
Community Health and/or School Health; Health Care 
Management; and the community college partnership program 
leading to the Bachelor's of Technical/Professional Studies in 
Chemical Dependency Counseling and Education with tracks in 
Chemical Dependency Counseling and Rehabilitation and 
Chemical Dependency Prevention and Education. 

Students interested in Health Education, Health Care 
Management, or Chemical Dependency Counseling and Education 
should contact the department chair to receive both information 
about these programs and forms needed for the selected programs 
in completing a course of study. All students should meet with their 
assigned adviser each term. In addition to completing major 
requirements, students must complete the General Education 
requirements. A minimum grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher is 
necessary for all required courses in the ma|or and minor. 

TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

All Health Science majors must complete a minimum of 30 units 
toward the major at Towson Universit)-, with at least 15 units at the 
upper level (300-400), including the advanced writing course 
(GenEd I.D). 

MAJOR IN HEALTH SCIENCE — 
HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

Health education is both a science and an art that deals with the 
complexities of human behavior with the expressed purpose of pro- 
moting healthy behaviors. In order to develop the competencies 
necessary to be an effective health educator, students need a foun- 
dation built on principles derived from behavioral, biomedical and 
social sciences, as well as education. The expertise common to all 
health education specialists, regardless of the setting in which they 
practice, is the ability to apply teaching/learning principles to 
health/illness issues. 

The Department of Health Science offers two Health Education 
Programs: the School Health — Teacher Education Concentration 
and the Community Health Concentration. The first three terms of 
course work provide the foundation for both the Community 
Health Concentration and the School Health Concentration. In the 
fourth term of study, students opting for the Community Health 
Concentrations must select a Community Health focus area (15 
units) from the following: Community Health Leadership, 
Environment, Gerontology, Health Communication, Health 
Promotions and Wellness, Maternal and Child Health, Pre- 
Physicians Assistant, Sexuality, or an individual focus area with 
consultation from an adviser. Students must complete these 15 
units with a GPA of 2.00 or higher. The Pre-Physicians Assistant 
focus area must include the following courses: Microbiology (4 
units). Biochemistry (preferred) or Organic Chemistry (4 units) and 



128 



The College of Health Professions 



Statistics (4 units). Students in the Community Health 
Concentration could also choose to minor in another discipline like 
Spanish in lieu of selecting a community health focus area. In the 
junior year of this program, students must decide if they want to 
participate in a community health internship or a student teaching 
experience. Students selecting the student teaching experience will 
receive certification to teach grades 5 through 12. The students 
who select School Health — Teacher Education must meet the 
requirements for admission to the professional education program 
and to student teaching. Prior to student teaching, individuals must 
pass the Praxis I test. Students should schedule this examination 
during their junior year. Transfer students should plan to take addi- 
tional terms of study. 

Curriculum and Planning (HLTH 315) fulfills the GenEd I.D 
advanced level writing course requirement. 

GenEd requirements include ENGL 102, BIOL 110, SOCI 
101, PSYC 101, CHEM 100 or 105, HLTH 101 and HLTH 315. 

SCHOOL HEALTH — TEACHER EDUCATION 
CONCENTRATION 

Requirement for Admission to Teacher Education Program 

All students applying for admission to a Teacher Education pro- 
gram at Towson University are required to complete a Criminal 
Background Disclosure Form. This form is to he notarized and 
sent to the director of the Center for Professional Practice to be 
kept on file. Please read the section on Admission to Teacher 
Education Programs in the College of Education section. 

Requirement for Student Teaching 

All pre-service students in Teacher Education programs at Towson 
University whose program of study requires an intensive/extensive 
internship or student teaching experience in a public or private 
school setting (pre-K through 12) will be required to undergo a 
criminal background check before entering this experience. The 
criminal background check must be filed with the director of the 
Center for Professional Practice. Please read the section on 
Admission to Student Teaching in the College of Education section. 

COMMUNITY HEALTH INTERNSHIP 

The Community Health Internship serves as a capstone experience 
where students can apply the knowledge they have gained in a 
health setting. To be eligible for the internship, students must have 
senior status and must have successfully completed all required 
courses with a grade of C or better. 

RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR HEALTH 
EDUCATION STUDENTS 
Freshman Year 
First Term (16 units) 

HLTH 101 Wellness for a Diverse Society (3) (II.B.3) 

BIOL 1 10 C;ontemporary General Biology (4) (II.A.l) 

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) (II.C.2) 

ENGL 102 Writing for a Liberal Education (3) (LA) 

HIST 145 HistoryoftheU.S. to thc.Vlid- 19th Century (3) ILB.l 

or 
HIST 146 History of the U.S. Since the Mid- 19th Century (3) ILB.l 

Second Term (16 units) 

CHEM 105 Chemistry for Allied Health Professions (4) (II.A.l) 

COMM 131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 

SOCI 10! Introduction to Sociology (3) 

xxxx Course in Non-Western Culture (3) 

xxxx GenEd LB Elective (3) 



Sophomore Year 

First Term (16 units) 

BIOL 213 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4) 

HLTH 103 Emergency Medical Care (3) 

HTLH 222 Foundations of Health and Health Behavior (3) 

HLTH 207 Health Care in the U.S. (3) CHTH/SCHE" 

xxxx GenEd. I.E (3) 

Second Term (16 units) 

BIOL 214 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4) 

PSYC 201 Educational Psychology (3) 

xxxx GenEd II.C.l (no history) 

MATH XXX Math (3) (I.C) 

HLTH XXX Community Health Focus Area (3) 

Junior Year 

First Term (15-16 units) 

HLTH 315 Curriculum and Planning in Health Education (3) 

HLTH 208 Mental Health/Stress/Crisis (3) 

xxxx GenEd Elective (ILD)(3) 

HLTH 31 1 Chronic and Communicable Disease (3) 

SCED 341 Principles of Secondary Education (4) 

or 
HLTH XXX Community Health Focus Area (3) 



Second Term (15-16 units) 

HLTH 425 
HLTH 435 
HLTH 220 
HLTH 405 
SCED 460 



HLTH .XXX 



Instructional Methods in Health Education (3) 

Epidemiological Basis of Diseases (3) CHTH/SCHE* 

Sexuality in a Diyerse Society (3) 

Drugs and Our Culture (3) 

Teaching Reading Secondary School (4) SCHE/SCHL* 

or 

Community Health Focus Area (3) 



Senior Year 

First Term (12-15 units) 

HLTH 204 Nutrition/Weight Control Consumer (3) 

HLTH 430 Organization/lmplementation/Management of Health 

Programs (3) 
HLTH 432 Measurement and Evaluation in Health Education (3) 
EDUC 401 Foundations of Education (3) SCHE/SCHL* 

or 
SPED 301 Introduction to Special Education (3) SCHE/SCHL' 

or 
HLTH XXX Community Health Focus Area (3-6) 

Second Term (12-15 units) 

HLTH 422 Field Work in Community Health ( 121 

or 
SCED 46 1 Teaching Reading in Content SCHE/SCHL (3) 

jtid 
HLTH 388 Student Teaching in Secondary Education (12) 

or 
SCED 46 1 Teaching Reading in Content SCHE/SCHL (3) 

and 
HLTH 387 Student Teaching in Secondary Education (6) 
HLTH 421 Fieldwork in Coninumity Health (6) 

Total Units 120-124 

*Concentrations Noted 

SCHL - courses required for .School Health 

CHTH -courses required for Community Health 

SCHE - courses required for Community/School Health 

HONORARY SOCIETY 

Eta Sigma Gamma, the national professional honorary society in 
health education, has established the Beta Zeta Chapter in the 
Department of Health Science. The purpose of the organization is 
to elevate standards, ideals and ethics of the profession. For infor- 
mation concerning Beta Zeta, contact the chair of Health Science, 
410-704-2378. 



Department of Health Science 



129 



MAJOR IN HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT 

The Health Care Management curriculum is designed to provide 
students with a comprehension of U.S. health care organizations, a 
public health orientation including epidemiological concepts and 
tools, and the math language and computer competencies for 
research development, organizational management and/or program 
evaluation. Depending on a student's interest, graduate training in 
health administration is recommended after completing this course 
of study. 

Required Prerequisites (21 units) 

ACCT 201 Accounting Principles I (3) 

ACCT 202 Accounting Principles II (3) 

ECON 201 Microeconomic Principles (3) 

ECON 202 Macroeconomic Principles (3) 

HLTH 101 Current Health Problems (3) 

MATH 23 1 Basic Statistics ( 3 ) 

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) 

Required Courses 

Health Care Management (18 units) 

HLTH 207 Health Care in the U.S. (3) 

HCMN 305 Health Care Administration (3) 

HLTH 311 Chronic and Communicable Disease (3) 

HCMN 413 Services and Housing for the Long-Term Care Consumer 

(3) 
HCMN 415 Finance and Organization of Health Care in the U.S. (3) 
HCMN 441 Legal and Ethical Issues in Health Administration (3) 

Business Core (12 units) 

LEGL 225 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

FIN 331 Financial Management (3) 

MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 
MKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (3) 

Interdepartmental Courses (12-13 units) 

COSC 111 Information and Technology for Business (3) 

ECON 339 Heahh Economics (3) 
ENGL 317 Writing for Business and Industry (3) 
Laboratory Science Elective (3,4) 

Long-Temi Care Track (12 units) 

HCMN 413 Services and Housing for the Long-Term Care Consumer (3) 

HCMN 417 Long-Term Care Ethical Problems (3) 

HCMN 419 Long-Term Care Administration (3) 

HLTH 41 1 Health and Later Maturity — The Aging Process (3) 

Intemship-HCMN 495 (12 units) 

Students have the opportunity to gain hands-on, practical work 
experience in this required full term capstone course. Students will 
be able to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in 
managing and delivering health services. 

Students must apply for the internship in the term prior to 
enrolling in HCMN 495. The internship coordinator will assign 
students to a placement site based on the acceptability of student to 
agency and the acceptability of agency to student. 

MINOR IN HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT 

The minor in Health Care Management consists of 18 units. All 
required courses must be completed with a GPA of 2.00 or higher. 

Required Courses 

HLTH 207 Health Care in the U.S. (3) 

HCMN 305 Communirj- Health Administration (3) 

or 
MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 

HCMN 413 Services and Housing for the Long-Term Care Consumer (3) 
HCMN 415 Financing and Organization of Health Care Services in 

the U.S. (3) 
HCMN 441 Legal and Ethical Issues in Health Administration (3) 
ECON 339 Health Economics (3) 



AMERICAN COLLEGE OF HEALTHCARE 
EXECUTIVES 

The American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) has offi- 
cially designated Towson University's undergraduate program in 
Health Care Management as a Student Chapter. ACHE is designed 
to provide networking and leadership opportunities for health care 
management students, to increase oral and written communication 
skills, to instill motivation for lifelong learning and application of 
that knowledge in the health services field, and to raise awareness 
of the Health Care Management major itself. For information con- 
cerning ACHE, contact the coordinator of the Health Care 
Management Program, 410-704-4219. 

HEALTH SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 
RECOGNITION AWARDS 

This award is presented in the spring commencement ceremony to 
outstanding undergraduate Health Education and Health Care 
Management majors. 

MAJOR IN CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY 
COUNSELING AND EDUCATION 

The Bachelor's of Technical/Professional Studies (B.T.P.S.) in 
Chemical Dependency Counseling and Education is an articulated 
program for students who have completed an Associate of Applied 
Sciences (A.A.S.) degree. This 2+2 program consists of training in 
the Chemical Dependency Counseling Program at the Community 
College of Baltimore County, Dundalk, followed by additional 
years of study at Towson University to complete the bachelor's 
degree in Chemical Dependency Counseling and Education. 

The bachelor's degree program includes the following areas of 
curricular emphasis: 

• Chemical dependency prevention at the primary, secondary and 
tertiary levels 

• Fundamental tasks and responsibilities of the chemical depend- 
ency counselor 

• Analysis and application of current research and outcome data 
in clinical practice 

• Ethical and behavioral standards of conduct in helping relation- 
ships 

• Diversity and its influence on educational strategies and clinical 
practice 

The program offered by the Community College of Baltimore 
County, Dundalk, prepares students to be chemical dependency 
counselors. The Towson University program enhances the knowl- 
edge and skills gained through the community college program by 
focusing particularly on ethical and behavioral standards, cultural 
diversity and research applications as they relate to prevention and 
treatment of chemical dependency. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants must meet the general requirements for undergraduate 
study outlined in the catalogs of the Community College of 
Baltimore County and Towson University. To enter the Towson 
University program, students must also have earned 62 to 64 credits 
from an institution's A.A.S. degree program in chemical dependency 
counseling or mental health/human services. 



130 



The College of Health Professions 



Program Requirements 

The Bachelor's of Technical/Professional Studies in Chemical 
Dependency Counseling and Education requires the completion of 
a minimum of 120 units, 62-64 of which are earned through the 
A.A.S. degree program. Of the 120 units, each student must com- 
plete 30 units in the arts and sciences, as follows: 

• 6 units in communication (including an advanced writing 
course) 

• 6 units in mathematics/computer science (MATH 231 or other 
appropriate statistics course) 

• 12 units in fine arts, social/behavioral sciences and humanities 

• 6 units in natural sciences (one of which must be a 4-unit lab 
science) 

Lower-level courses from two-year institutions will he applied to 
this 30-unit requirement, as appropriate. 

In addition, students must complete 36-39 upper-level units 
including 18-19 units in one of two tracks: Chemical Dependency 
Counseling and Rehabilitation or Chemical Dependency 
Prevention and Education, and 15 units in upper-level electives. An 
additional 6 upper-level units of internship/practicum experience 
are also required beyond the internship experience earned via the 
A.A.S. degree program. 

CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY COUNSELING AND 
REHABILITATION TRACK 

Students who wish to pursue this track must have completed at 
least 24 units in counseling or psychology, with course work in 
abnormal psychology; theories of addiction behavior and counsel- 
ing; individual, family and group counseling; pharmacology; and 
delivery of services. 

Required Courses (19 units) 

CDCE 405/505 Professional Standards and Ethical Responsibilities (3) 

CDCE XXX Research Applications in Professional Practice (3) 

CDCE 403/503 Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Addictions (3) 

PSYC 3 14 Research Methods in Psychology (4) 

PSYC 429 .Multicultural Counseling (3) 

NURS 404 Health Care: An Interdisciplinary Approach (3) 

or 
HCMN 415 Financing and Organization of Health Care Services 

(3) 

Electives (15 units) 

The track requires 15 units of upper-division electives. Students 
should consult with their adviser to develop a coherent course of 
study. Students may receive approval from their adviser to com- 
plete electives not listed here. 
PSYC 309 Psvchopharmacology (3) 

PSYC 315 Motivation (3) 

PSYC 350 Personality (3) 

PSYC 361 Abnormal Psychology (3) 

PSYC 404 Adolescent Psychology (3) 

PSYC 431 Group Dynamics (3) 

PSYC 430 Systems and Techniques of Psychotherapy (3) 

PSYC 453 Issues in Mental Health Intervention (3) 

HITH 401 Teaching about Drugs and Sex (3) 
HLTH 432 Measurement and Evaluation (3) 
HLTH 331 Nutrition for Health Professionals (3) 

HLTH 430 Organization, Implementation and Management of 

Health Education Programs (3) 
SOCI 343 Mmority Groups (3) 

SOCI351 Deviant Behavior (3) 

SOCI 352 Community Corrections (3) 

SOCI 353 Theories of Crime (3) 

SOCI 3.54 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3) 

SOCI 355 Delinquency and Juvenile Justice (3) 

NURS 323 Crisis and Stress Management (3) 
NURS 406 Cultural Diversity and Health Care (3) 



Internship (12 units) 

Students are required to complete at least 12 units of an intern- 
ship/practicum experience, and 6 of the internship units must be 
upper-level units. Internships offer students the opportunity to gain 
practical work experience, learn new skills and develop professional 
contacts. These experiences are provided at a variety of treatment 
and prevention sites statewide, such as inpatient facilities, outpa- 
tient clinics, public health agencies and private sector programs. 

CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY PREVENTION AND 
EDUCATION TRACK 

Required Courses (18 units) 

CDCE XXX Research Applications in Professional Practice (3) 
CDCE 402/502 Health and Social Welfare Promotion: Health 

Communication (3) 
HLTH 315 Curriculum and Planning (3) 
NURS 323 Crisis and Stress Management (3) 
HLTH 405 Drugs in Our Culture (3) 
PSYC 429 Multicultural Counseling (3) 

Electives (15 units) 

The track requires 15 units of upper-division electives. Students 
should consult with their adviser to develop a coherent course of 
study. Students may receive approval from their adviser to com- 
plete electives not listed here. 
PSYC 309 Psychopharmacology (3) 

PSYC 315 Motivation (3) 

PSYC 350 Personality (3) 

PSYC 361 Abnormal Psychology (3) 

PSYC 404 Adolescent Psychology (3) 

PSYC 431 Group Dynamics (3) 

PSYC 430 Systems and Techniques of Psychotherapy (3) 

PSYC 453 Issues in .Mental Health Intervention (3) 

HLTH 401 Teaching about Drugs and Sex (3) 
HLTH 432 Measurement and Evaluation (3) 
HLTH 331 Nutrition for Health Professionals (3) 
HLTH 430 Organization, Implementation and Management of 

Health Education Programs (3) 
SOCI 343 .Minorin- Groups (3) 

SOCI 351 Deviant' Behavior (3) 

SOCI 352 Communin- Corrections (3) 

SOCI 353 Theories of Crime (3) 

SOCI 354 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3) 

SOCI 355 Delinquency and Juvenile Justice (3) 

NURS 323 Crisis and Stress Management (3) 
NURS 406 Cultural Diversity and Health Care (3) 

Internship (12 units) 

Students are required to complete at least 12 units of an intern- 
ship/practicum experience, and 6 of the internship units must be 
upper-level units. Internships offer students the opportunity to gain 
practical work e.xperience, learn new skills and develop professional 
contacts. These experiences are provided at a variety of treatment 
and prevention sites statewide, such as inpatient facilities, outpa- 
tient clinics, public health agencies and private sector programs. 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 

The department offers a Master of Science degree with concentra- 
tions in Health Administration, Community Health Education, and 
School Health Education. For more information, see the Graduate 
Catalog. 



Department of Kinesiology 



PRE-MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY PRE-PROFESSIONAL 
PREPARATION 

A career in medical technology can he both stimulating and 
rewarding, since the field is rapidly growing with advances m med- 
ical science. The medical technologist works under the supervision 
of a pathologist in a laboratory and performs tests on which doc- 
tors rely for assistance in diagnosing or treating diseases. 

Towson Universitv's Pre-Medical Technologi," Program provides 
the hberal arts and science basis for continuation of the degree pro- 
gram at the University of Maryland at Baltimore (UMB) or 
Salisbury University. Pre-Medical Technology students are 
required to complete the GenEd requirements before transferring to 
another senior institution. 

Students who intend to transfer to UMB to complete the 
Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology must complete 
the following during the first two years at Towson. 

Biology 

BIOL 110 Contemporary General Biology (4) 
BIOL 213 .\natomy and Physiology I (4) 
BIOL 214 Anatomy and Physiology II (4) 
BIOL 315 Medical Microbiology (4) 

Chemistry 

CHEM 1 lb General Chemistr)' I (4| 
CHEM 111 General Chemistry U (4) 
CHEM 330 Organic Chemistry (5) 

Computer Science 
COSC 165 Visual Basic (3) 

English 

ENGL 102 Writing for a Liberal Education (3) 

ENGL XXX English Elective (3) 

Mathematics 

M-\TH HI Algebra for Applications (3) 

MATH 237 Elementary Biostatistics (4) 

Humanities Electives (3 units) 

Select courses from histon.', literature, philosophy, art and music. 
In addition, credit for foreign language will be given only upon 
completion of either the first elementary year or an advanced 
course. 

Behavior and Social Science Electives (6 units) 

Select from economics, political science, urban studies, sociology, 

geography, anthropology, African-American studies or psycholog)'. 

Electives (8 units) 



CHEM 331 Organic Chemistry n (5) 
PHYS 100 Understanding Physics (3) 

or 
PHYS 102 Introduction to Physics (3) 

BIOL 401 Genetics (4) 

Students should make application to UMB upon completing 45 
units at Towson. See the Pre-Medical Technology coordinator for 
appHcation information, Burdick Hall, room 141. 



Department of Kinesiology 

Professors: Andrea Boucher, Raymond Stinar, David Zang {Chair) 
Associate Professors: Ned Britt, Margaret Faulkner, William 

Forbes, Karla Kubitz 
Assistant Professors: Phil Albert, Vincent Angotti, Tammie Bories, 

Fieather Crowe, Michael Higgins, Marianna Florea, Elin Lobel, 

Robert Martin, Gail Parr, Darcy Plymire, Carl Runk, Lisa 

Swanson 
Instructors: Wendy Dean, Matt Rothbard, April Tripp, Susan 

Truitt, Tabatha Uhrich 
Part-time Paculty: Kenneth Badders, Lisa Digiacinto, 

Susan Harnett, Terrv' O'Brien, Andrea Worthington 



opncE 

Towson Center 200, 410- 



'04-2376 



PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Kinesiology offers five academic majors: 
Physical Education, Athletic Training, Sport Management, 
Exercise Science, and Sport Studies. The Sport Studies major pro- 
vides a concentration in Psychology of Sport or a track in Sport 
and the Humanities. 

In addition, the Department of Kinesiology offers KNES 235 
Individualized Fitness, as an approved course for GenEd II.B.3 
American Experience: Contemporan.' Issues. 

The department also offers a series of 2-unit activity courses 
that emphasize the development of skills, knowledge and fitness 
necessar)- to lead an active life. Some of the courses offered in this 
series include: 

PHEA 205 Self Defense, Protection and Personal Safety 
PHEA 207 Rhythmic Aerobics 
PHEA 209 Ballroom Dance 
PHEA 211 Cardiovascular Movement: Jogging, Cycling and 

In-Line Skating 
PHEA 215 Recreational Sports: Bowling, Billiards and Golf 
PHE.\ 217 Invasion Spons: Basketball, Lacrosse and Soccer 
PHEA 221 Net Games: Badminton, Tennis and Vollevball 

PHEA 223 Wall Games: Handball, Racquetball and Squash 

MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

This program prepares competent teachers in Physical Education 
for elementarv- and secondary schools. Graduates are certified to 
teach at the elementary and secondary levels. A planned sequence 
of courses is designed to provide the student with skills and lead- 
ership experience needed to direct a balanced program in class, 
intramural and extramural activities. 

Students majoring in Physical Education must complete 35 units 
in KNES professional core courses, 13 units in KNES professional 
laboratory skill courses, 6 units in KNES elective courses, 28-29 
units in lower-level courses, and 19 units in teacher education 
courses. Students must complete all required and prerequisite 
courses for the major with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. In 
addition, the following professional education courses must be 
completed with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher and a cumu- 
lative GPA of 2.75: PSYC 201 Educational Psychology-; ELED 324 
Integrating Literacy in the K-12 Content Areas: KNES 324 
Teaching PE in Elementary School; KNES 325 Teaching PE in 
Secondary School; EDUC 401 Foundations of Education; and 
KNES 423 Adaptive Physical Education. 

All pre-service students in Teacher Education programs at 
Towson Universit)' whose program of study requires an intensive 
and extensive internship or student teaching experience in a public 
or private school setting (pre-K through 12) will be required to 
undergo a criminal background check before beginning this expe- 
rience. The criminal background check must be filed with the 
director of the Center for Professional Practice. Students enrolled 



132 



The College of Health Professions 



in the Physical Education major must complete the criminal back- 
ground check prior to enrollment in any of the following courses: 
KNES 324 Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School, 
KNES 325 Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School, 
and KNES 423 Adaptive Physical Education. 

A certification in Health Science is available for students who 
wish to be certified to teach in physical education and health edu- 
cation at the elementary and secondary levels. Students are advised 
that the Department of Health Science is responsible for establish- 
ing the health-education requirements for this program. As such, 
students interested in pursuing this option must contact the chair of 
Health Science for additional and current information. 

Program Requirements 

The requirements for the major in Physical Education include 35 
units of KNES professional core courses, 13 units of KNES profes- 
sional laboratory courses, 6 units of KNES electives, 19 units in 
teacher education courses, and 28-29 units in lower-level courses. 
The specific requirements for the Physical Education major are 
as follows: 

KNES Professional Core (35 units) 

KNES 290 Introduction to Teaching m Physical Education (2) 

KNES 298 Histor)- and Philosophy of Physical Education (3) 

KNES 309 Tests and Measurements (3) 

KNES 311 Biomechanics (3) 

KNES 313 Physiology^ of Exercise (3) 

KNES 315 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (3) 

KNES 324 Teaching Physical Education in the Elementar)' School (3) 

KNES 325 Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School (3) 

KNES 341 Concepts of Motor Learnmg (3) 

KNES 355 Psychology of Sport (3) 

KNES 423 Adaptive Physical Education (3) 

KNES 426 Motor Development (3) 

KNES Professional Lab Skills/Activities (13 units) 

KNES 140 Track and Field (1) 

KNES 150 Personal DefenseAJCrestling (1) 

KNES 156 Gymnastics (1) 

KNES 165 Swimming (1) 

KNES 182 Field Court 1(1) 

KNES 183 Ballroom, Folk and Square Dance (1) 

KNES 184 Field Court 11(1) 

KNES 202 NetAJPall Games ( 1 ) 

KNES 210 Lifetime Activities (1) 

KNES 239 Physical Fitness Activities ( 1 ) 

KNES 279 Teaching Techniques in Creative Movement (1) 

KNES 283 Physical Education Activities for the Young Child (1) 

KNES 284 Adventure-Based Education Activities (1) 

KNES Professional Electives (6 units) 

KNES 305 Outdoor Education Philosophy and Methods (3) 

KNES 307 Teaching .Apprenticeship (.5-1) 

KNES 331 Principles of Coaching (3) 

KNES 337 Advanced Coaching Techniques (3) 

KNES 351 Philosophy: The Sport Experience (3) 

KNES 353 Sportand'Society (3) 

KNES 395 Kinesiology Internship (3) 

KNES 399 Differentiated Student Teaching (1-3) 

KNES 470 Selected Topics in Physical Education (3) 

KNES 496 Independent Study (1-3) 

Teacher Education Core (19 units) 

ELED 324 Integrating Literacy in the K-12 Content Areas (3) 

EDUC 401 Foundations of Education (3) 

KNES 392 Elementary Student Teaching (6) 

KNES 394 Secondary Student Teaching (6) 

KNES 480 Seminar in Teaching Physical Education (1) 



Additional Required Courses (28-29 units) 
BIOL 1 10 Contemporarv General Biologv (4) 

BIOL 211-212 Anatomy and Physiology (4) 

or 
BIOL 213-214 Anatomy and Physiology (4) 
CHE.M 105 Chemistry for Allied Health Professions 1 (4) 

or 
PHYS 202 General Physics for the Health Sciences (5) 

IDHP 1 10 Information Utilization in the Health Professions (3) 

or 
ISTC 201 Using Information Effectively in Education (3) 

COMM 131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 
PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) 

PSYC 201 Educational Psychology (3) 

MAJOR IN ATHLETIC TRAINING 

The program of study in Athletic Training is designed for students 
who are interested in a career in allied health care specializing in 
the care of athletes and physically active individuals. Athletic train- 
ers function as integral members of the athletic health care team in 
secondary schools, colleges and universities, sports medicine clin- 
ics, professional sports organizations and other health care settings. 
The athletic trainer specializes in the prevention, assessment, man- 
agement, rehabilitation and health care administration of athletic 
injuries and illnesses. 

The Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP) is designed to 
provide an effective blend of theoretical and practical learning 
experiences in athletic training by incorporating extensive academ- 
ic and clinical education experiences. The ATEP is accredited by the 
Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education 
Programs (CAAHEP). Successful completion of the Athletic 
Training Education Program prepares an individual as a candidate 
for the National .\thletic Trainers" Board of Certification examination. 

The goals of the ATEP are first and foremost to provide students 
with a quality, well-rounded education. Second, the ATEP seeks to 
provide all necessary cognitive, psychomotor and affective compe- 
tencies and proficiencies in a formalized multidimensional academ- 
ic and clinical setting for students to be successful in the field of 
athletic training. Last, the ATEP provides opportunities for stu- 
dents to participate in communit)' events and professional activities 
that will instill a sense of active participation in theit communities 
and chosen profession. 

The ATEP is a capped major with a limited enrollment. As such, 
admission to the university does not guarantee admission to the 
program. 

Screening Process for the Accredited Athletic Training 
Education Program 

Students desiring to major in Athletic Training are admitted to the 
Pre-.^thletic Training Program. Students seeking admission into the 
Athletic Training major are required to have completed the follow- 
ing courses: BIOL 110, PSYC 201, KNES 235, KNES 291, HLTH 
101,HLTH103. 

Prospective students must submit the following materials as part 
of the secondary screening procedure: program application (includ- 
ing personal statement); signed technical standards verifying that, 
with appropriate accommodation, they meet the technical stan- 
dards for an entry-level athletic trainer; and verification of health 
status form (signed by the applicant's health care provider). 

Transfer Students 

Transfer students must submit a copy of an official transcript to 
show completion of equivalent course work at their previous insti- 
tutions. Students transferring to the ATEP need to provide docu- 
mentation that they have satisfied the clinical competencies and 
proficiencies addressed in KNES 291. Students need to provide ver- 
ification that they have satisfied these required skills at the sending 
institution under the direction of a Towson University-approved 



Department of Kinesiology 



133 



clinical instructor. If verification is not available, the student will 
meet with the coordinator of the ATEP and work through the 
checklist. If the student has not been exposed to, and evaluated in, 
these proficiencies, the student will need to complete KNES 291 at 
Towson Universit)'. 

The Pre-AT student will make formal application, which includes 
all of the materials stated below, to the coordinator of the ATEP no 
later than the second Friday in May: official transcripts, directed 
observation hours, tw'o letters of recommendation, essay and clini- 
cal skills worksheet. 

Evaluative Criteria 

Seven criteria are evaluated as part of the admission process in 
accepting students into the ATEP: 

1. Overall GPA - Students must have a minimum overall GP.\ of 
2.00 in their college courses to be able to apply to the ATEP. 

2. Prerequisite Courses GPA - Six classes (KNES 291, KNES 235, 
BIOL 1 10, HLTH 103, HLTH 101 and PSYC 101) are used to cal- 
culate the prerequisite courses GPA. 

3. Observation Hours - Students are assigned by the ATEP coor- 
dinator or clinical coordinator of education to a variety of clinical 
settings at Towson University, which include athletic trainmg 
rooms, athletic practices and competitive events, to gain valuable 
directed observation hours. 

4. Letters of Recommendation - Students seeking admission into 
the ATEP will be asked to secure two letters of recommendation 
from individuals who can attest to their personality, academic suc- 
cess, intellectual abilities and cHnical abilities. 

5. Interview - Candidates seekmg admission to the ATEP are given 
a formal interview conducted bv the Athletic Training Admission 
Committee. 

6. Essay - Applicants will submit a one-page essay stating why 
they want to pursue the profession of athletic training. 

7. Clinical Skills Worksheet - Students are expected to complete 
the clinical skills worksheet during the course of the academic year 
(September - March). The worksheet will consist of skills that each 
student should be proficient in performing (i.e. making an ice bag, 
taping an ankle, wrapping a thigh). 

Along with the above evaluation criteria the following must be 
completed and turned into the program coordinator to begin clini- 
cal hours: (1) program application, (2) acceptance of technical stan- 
dards, and (3) verification of health status form. 

Acceptance into the program is based upon the stated criteria and 
the number of available openings in the program. Meeting the min- 
imum admission requirements does not guarantee acceptance into 
the program. Offers of admission into the ATEP are presented on a 
competitive basis to those individuals who are most qualified. 
Students must apply for admission to the program by the second 
Friday of May in the spring term. Candidates will be notified of 
acceptance/rejection in the first week of June by mail. 

Appeal Procedures 

Students who are not admitted into the program can re-apply three 
times, but it will still take six terms to complete the required class 
and clinical workload. If the student does not maintain an overall 
GPA of 2.00, a C or better in all didactic Athletic Training courses, 
and a grade of satisfactory in all clinical courses, the student will be 
placed on probation for one year. If the student does not rectify the 
stated deficiency within the one-year period the student will be 
dropped from the program. 

For more detailed information regarding the ATEP at Towson 
University please refer to the Athletic Training Education section 
at: http//wwwnew.towson.edu/kinesiology. 



Program Requirements 

The requirements for the major in Athletic Training include 25-26 
units of lower-level courses and 54 units of KNES courses. The spe- 
cific requirements for the major in Athletic Training are as follows: 

KNES Required Courses (54 units) 

KNES 235 Individualized Fitness (3) 

KNES 29 1 Introduction to Athletic Training ( 1 ) 

KNES 309 Tests and Measurements (3) 

KNES 311 Biomechanics (3) 

KNES 313 Physiology of Exercise (3) 

KNES 315 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (3) 

KNTiS 363 Nutrition for E.xercise and Sport (3) 

KNTS 381 Basic Clinical Athletic Training 1(1) 

KNES 382 Basic Clinical .Athletic Training II (1) 

KNES 385 Intermediate Clinical Athletic Training 1(1) 

KNES 386 Intermediate Clinical Athletic Training II (1) 

KNES 388 Advanced Clinical Athletic Training 1(1) 

KNES 389 Advanced Clinical Athletic Training II (1) 

KNES 415 Advanced Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (3) 

KNES 417 Organization and Administration of Athletic Training (3) 

KNES 427 Therapeutic Exercise in Athletic Training (3) 

KNES 428 Therapeutic .Modalities in Athletic Training (3) 

KNES 429 Physical Assessment in .Athletic Training (3) 

KNES 431 Seminar in Athletic Training (2) 

Plus 12 units selected from KNES upper-division courses 

Lower-Level Required Courses (25-26 units) 
BIOL 110 Contemporar)' General Biology (4) 

BIOL 211-212 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4) 
BIOL 213-214 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4) 
CHEM 105 Chemistry for Allied Health Professions I (4) 

or 
PHYS 202 General Physics for the Health Sciences (5) 

HLTH 101 Wellness for a Diverse Society (3) 
HLTH 103 E.VIC, First Aid and Safety (3) 
PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) 

MAJOR IN EXERCISE SCIENCE 

The major in Exercise Science is intended to examine the relation- 
ship between exercise and human performance and the role of 
physical activity in the promotion of healthy lifestyles. Exercise sci- 
ence consists of several overlapping disciplines, including biome- 
chanics, exercise physiology and biochemistry, growth and devel- 
opment, exercise nutrition, measurement and evaluation, and exer- 
cise psychology. The program of study is designed to provide an 
effective blend of classroom instruction and practical experience. 
The program is intended to prepare qualified individuals for 
careers in clinical, corporate, commercial, and/or community exer- 
cise/wellness settings as well as to prepare students for graduate 
study in related fields. 

Program Requirements 

The requirements for the major in Exercise Science include 27 units 
of lower-level courses and 45 units of KNES courses. The specific 
requirements for the major in Exercise Science are as follows: 

KNES Required Courses (45 units) 

KNES 235 Individualized Fitness (3) 

KNES 309 Tests and .Measurements (3) 

KNES 3 1 1 Biomechanics (3) 

KNES 3 1 3 Physiology of Exercise (3) 

KNES 315 Care and Prevention of .\thletic Injuries (3) 

KNES 361 E.xercise Psychology (3) 

KNES 363 Nutrition for E.xercise and Sport (3) 

KNES 365 Exercise Testing and Prescription (3) 

KNES 369 Practicum in Exercise Science (3) 

KNES 395 Kinesiology Internship (3) 

KN^ES 469 Research .Methods in Exercise Science (3) 

Plus 12 units from a selected group of KNES upper-division courses 



134 



The College of Health Professions 



Required Lower-Level Courses (27 units) 

BIOL 110 Contemporary General Biology (4) 

BIOL 211-212 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4) 

BIOL 213-214 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4) 

CHEM 105 Chemistry for Allied Health Professionals (4) 

HLTH 101 Wellness for a Diverse Society (3) 

PHYS 202 General Physics for the Health Sciences (5) 

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) 

MAJOR EVJ SPORT MANAGEMENT 

The major in Sport Management is designed to address the unique 
position of sports in American business and to prepare students for 
careers in athletic and recreation administration, the fitness indus- 
try, college and professional sports, and retail marketing. 

Program Requirements 

The requirements for the major in Sport Management include 18 
units of lower-level courses, 36 units of KNES courses and 12 units 
of BUAD courses. Students interested in Sport Management are 
strongly encouraged to pursue the minor in Business 
Administration (BUAD) as part of their program of study. The 
requirements for the major in Sport Management with a minor in 
BUAD include 24 units in lower-level courses, 36 units of KNES 
courses and 9 units of BUAD courses. 

The specific requirements for the major in Sport Management 
are as follows: 

Lower-Level Requirements (18 units) 
ACCT 201 Accounting Principles I (3) 
ACCT 202 Accounting Principles II (3) 
COMM 131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 
COSC 1 1 1 Information and Technology for Business (3) 

ECON 201 Microeconomic Principles (3) 
PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) 

KNES Required Courses (36 units) 

KNES 235 Individualized Fitness |3) 

KNES 333 Sport Management (3) 

KNES 353 Sport and Society (3) 

KNES 355 Psvchology of Sport (3) 

KNES 393 World History of Sport to 1 900 (3) 

or 
KNES 451 History of American Sport (3) 

KNES 395 Kinesiology Internship (3) 

KNES 453 Sport .Administration (3) 

Plus 15 units of electives from selected KNES and BUAD courses 

BUAD Required Courses (12 units) 
.VIKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (3) 
MKTG 345 Advertising Management (3) 
MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 
MNGT 381 Human Resource Management (3) 

The specific requirements for the major in Sport Management with 

a minor in BUAD are as follows: 

Lower-Level Requirements (24 units) 

ACCT 20! 

ACCT 202 

COMM 131 

COSC 1 1 1 

ECON 201 

ECON 202 

ECON 205 



MATH 23 1 
PSYC 101 



Accounting Principles I (3) 

Accounting Principles II (3) 

Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 

Information and Technology for Business (3) 

Microeconomic Principles (3) 

Macroeconomic Principles (3) 

Statistics for Business and Economics (3) 

or 

Basic Statistics (3) 

Introduction to Psychology (3) 



KNES Requirements (36 units) 

KNES 235 Individualized Fitness (3) 

KNES 333 Sport Management (3) 

KNES 353 Sport and Society (3) 

KNES 355 Psvchology of Sport (3) 

KNES 393 World History of Sport to 1900 (3) 

or 
KNES 451 History of American Sport (3) 

KNES 395 Kinesiology Internship (3) 

KNES 453 Sport Administration (3) 

Plus 15 units of electives from selected KNES and BUAD courses 

BUAD Requirements (9 units) 

FIN 331 Principles of Financial Management (3) 

MKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (3) 

MNGT 361 Principles of Management (3) 

'Note: Students must complete a minimum of 12 units in BUAD courses 

at Towson Universirv' in order to earn a minor in BUAD. 

MAJOR IN SPORT STUDIES 

The Sport Studies program focuses on the current knowledge base 
and interpretations of human interaction in sport. The program 
provides a range of interdisciplinary study options leading to 
preparation for graduate study or employment in sport-related 
positions. 

PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT CONCENTRATION 

The program in Psychology of Sport is designed to address aspects 
of psychological study related to athletic performance, exercise and 
physical activity. Students selecting this concentration must also 
declare a minor in Psychology. 

Required KNES Courses (18 units) 

KNES 235 Individualized Fitness (3) 

KNES 285 Sport: A Cross-Cultural Perspective (3) 

KNES 353 Sport and Society (3) 

KNES 355 Psychology of Sport (3) 

KNES 393 World History of Sport to 1900 (3) 

or 
KNES 451 History of American Sport (3) 

KNES 395 Kinesiology Internship (3) 

Kinesiology Electives 

Students must choose 15 units from KNES and selected psychology 
courses. 

MINOR IN PSYCHOLOGY 

Students are required to complete 26 units in psychology with a 
grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher in each course. Of these 26 units, 
14 units are to be completed in the core courses (PSYC 101 or 
PSYC 102; PSYC 203 or PSYC 204; PSYC 212; PSYC 314). The 
remaining 12 units must be used to satisfy four of the six topic 
areas listed below. Minors must satisfy the relevant prerequisites 
for individual psychology courses taken. 

Required Courses (26 units) 

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) 

or 
PSYC 102 Honors Introduction to Psychology (3) 

PSYC 203 Human Development (3) 

or 
PSYC 204 Honors Human Development (3) 

PSYC 212 Behavioral Statistics (4) 

PSYC 314 Research Methods in Psychology (4) 



Additional Required Courses 

BIOL 1 10 C'ontcmporary General Biology (4) 

COMM 131 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3) 



Department of Kinesiology 



135 



Select from the following to complete 26 units. The elective courses 
must include at least one course from four of the following six 
areas: Human Development, Clinical, Social, Biopsychology, 
Learning-Cognition and Diversity-. 

Topical Areas 

I. Human Development (3 units) 

PSYC 403 Infant and Child Development (3) 
PSYC 404 Adolescent Psycholog)- (3) 
PSYC 405 Psychology of Aging (3) 
PSYC 467 Midlife Development (3) 

n. Clinical (3 units) 

PSYC 350 Personality (3) 

PSYC 361 Abnormal Psychology (3) 

PSYC 411 Tests and Measurements (3) 

in. Social (3 units) 

PSYC 325 Social Psychology (3) 
PSYC 327 Industrial Psvchology (3) 
PSYC 43 1 Group Dynamics (3) 

rV. Biopsychology (3 units) 

PSYC 309 Psychopharmacology (3) 

PSYC 317 Sensation and Perception (3) 

PSYC 460 Etholog)- and Comparative Psychology (3) 

PSYC 465 Physiological Psycholog)- (3) 

V. Learning-Cognition (3 units) 
PSYC 305 Psycholog)' of Learning (3) 
PSYC 315 Motivation (3) 

PSYC 461 Cogninve Psychology (3) 

VI. Diversity (3 units) 

PSYC 432 Cross-Cuhural Counseling (3) 

PSYC 447 Sex Differences: Psychological Perspectives (3) 

PSYC 451 Introduction to the Exceptional Child (3) 

Sport and Humanities Track 

The program of study in Sport and Humanities is designed to 
address anthropological, historical, philosophical and sociological 
aspects of sport. Students selecting this track will be required to 
select 15 units of electives outside of Kinesiology in the humanities 
area. 

Required Kinesiology Courses (18 units) 

KNES 235 • - 

KNES285 

KNES 353 

KNES 355 

KNES 393 

KNES 451 
KNES 395 



Individualized Fitness (3) 

Sport: A Cross-Cultural Perspective (3) 

Sport and Society (3) 

Psychology of Sport (3) 

World History of Sport to 1900 (3) 

or 

History of American Sport (3) ('Spring) 

Kinesiology Internship (3) 



Guided Humanities Electives (15 units) 

Choose 15 units from the following courses; exceptions must he approved 

hy department adviser: 

AMST 201 Introduction to American Studies (3) 

AMST 497 Practicum in American Studies (3) 

ANTH 207 Cultural Anthropology (3) 

or 

ANTH 210 Honors Cultural Anthropolog)- (3) 

ANTH 209 Anthropology of American Culture (3) 

or 

ANTH 21 1 Honors Anthropology of American Culture (3) 

ANTTl 321 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3) 

CLST 201 Introduction to Cuhural Studies (3) 

CLST 303 Identin- and Culture (3) 

CLST 305 Textualiu- and Culture (3) 

HIST 145 History of US to Mid-19th Centun' (3) 

HIST 146 History of US since Mid-19th Century (3) 

HIST 151 The World since 1945 (3) 

HIST 364 Social Histon' of the United States since 1865 (3) 

HIST 382 African American Historj' from the Mid-1 9th Centura' (3) 

HIST 483 Biographical Studies in Histor\- (3) 

HIST 484 Historical Themes (3) 

LEGE 325 Sports Law (3) 

PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 111 Logic (3) 

PHIL 204 Race, Class and Gender (3) 

PHIL 253 Contemporar) Ethical Problems (3) 

pose 103 American National Government (3) 

POSC 209 Introduction to Law (3) 

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) 

SOCI 102 Honors Introduction to Sociology (3) 

SOCI 2 1 Sociology of Sport ( 3 ) 

SOCI 241 Blacks in America (3) 

SOCI 243 Sociology of Race, Class and Gender (3) 

SOCI 341 Class, Status and Power (31 

SOCI 343 Minorit) Groups (3| 

SOCI 37x Sociolog)- of Gender (3) 

WMST 231 Women in Perspective (3) 

WMST 335 Women, Work and Family (3) 

PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

The Department of Kinesiology offers three courses for students 
majoring in Early Childhood or Elementar\- Education. They are 
KNES 281-282 Physical Education for Elementary Education 
Students I, 11; and KNES 324 Teaching Physical Education in the 
Elementary School. KNES 281-282 are prerequisites for KNES 
324. 

TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

Kinesiology transfer credits will be evaluated by the department on 
an individual basis. A minimum of one-half of the units required in 
the major (KNES) must be completed at Towson Universin'. A 
grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher must be earned in all required 
courses and all prerequisites for required courses. 



Required Kinesiology Electives (9 units) 

Choose three of the following: 

KNES 349 The Modern Olympic Games (3) 

KNES 351 Philosophy: The Sport Experience (3) 

KNES 361 Exercise Psychology (3) 

KNTS437 Sport and the Media (3) 

KNES 441 The American Woman in Sport (3) 

KNES 470 Special Topics (3) 



136 



The College of Health Professions 



Department of Nursing 

Professor: Cynthia Kielinen 

Associate Professors: Christina Barricii, Joanna Basuray, Sharon 

Eifried, Deborah Greener, Jacquelyn Jordan (Chair), Joan 

Jordan, Mary Lashley, Dianne Taylor 
Assistant Professors: Marilyn Halstead, Vicky Kent, Lena Lee, 

Cathaleen Ley 
Clinical Assistant Professors: Beverly Bye, Sheila Green, Kim 

McCarron 
Visiting Instructors: Carol Gallo, Elizabeth Crusse 
Lecturer: Michelle R. Lane 
Part-time Faculty: Nancy Baldwin, Alice Behles, Suzanne Bonner, 

Diane Bradley, Loretta Dahlem, Joanne Dobry, Lori Geier, 

Patsie Griffin, Ruth Honnas, Elizabeth Rudolf, Jane Virden, 

Karen Williams-Cooper, Mary Wippel 

OFHCE 

Burdick Hall 137B, 410-704-2068 or 2069 
Recorded Information: 410-704-2067 
Admissions Coordinator: 410-704-4170 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Nursing is both an art and a science with an evolving body of spe- 
cialized knowledge derived from nursing research, as well as from 
the synthesis of knowledge from related disciplines. Nursing, inde- 
pendently or collaboratively, guides and influences the behavior of 
others in their efforts toward optimizing the health status of indi- 
viduals, families, groups and communities. 

Towson offers a program in professional nursing leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Nursing. The Nursing 
curriculum includes courses in the liberal arts, the sciences and 
nursing. The curriculum, designed for basic and registered nurse 
students, prepares the graduate to accept responsibility and 
accountability for the care of clients and families in a variety of 
health care settings, to function in beginning leadership roles, and 
to be consumers of and participants in nursing research. Students 
are also provided with the foundation for graduate study in nurs- 
ing. 

The Nursing Program is approved by the Maryland Board of 
Nursing, and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing 
Education. Basic students graduating from the Nursing major are 
eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination for 
Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). The Department of Nursing 
holds membership in the American Association of Colleges of 
Nursing, the Council of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree 
Programs of the National League for Nursing, Commission on 
Collegiate Nursing Education, and the Council on Collegiate 
Education in Nursing of the Southern Regional Education Board. 

MAJOR IN NURSING: BASIC STUDENTS 

The university requires a minimum of 120 units for graduation. 
However, established departmental requirements must also be 
completed for graduation with a Nursing major. This necessitates 
completion of more than 120 units for most students enrolled in 
the department. 

Students must complete all prerequisite courses prior to begin- 
ning the major. Proper course planning and good advising are key 
to timely admission to the major and completion of the program m 
four years. The departmental brochure contains a recommended 
course plan for students for the entire four-year degree. Pre-nurs- 
ing majors may request a nursing adviser to help them plan their 
academic program prior to admission to the major. Students can 
contact the department for specific information and to be assigned 
to an adviser. Once the student is admitted to the Nursing major, 
the nursing courses must be completed in a sequential pattern, 
because each course is a foundation for the subsequent course. 
Part-time study options are available. 



Pre-nursing students demonstrating competencies covered in 
MATH 115 (as determined by the Department of Mathematics) 
may enroll in an alternative offering of one of the following: 
MATH 116, MATH 1 19 or \L\TH 273, in order to meet the math- 
ematics requirement. Placement in the particular course is deter- 
mined by the Department of Mathematics. 

Because requirements may be revised from time to time, it is the 
student's responsibility to make certain that he or she is working 
with the most current materials. Contact the department for assis- 
tance with program planning. 

Requirements for the Major 

In addition to the General Education (GenEd) requirements, 
Nursing majors must complete the following prerequisites prior to 
beginning major course work. Several of these courses can also 
meet GenEd requirements. ("^GenEd) 

"ENGL 102 Writing for a Liberal Education (3) 
*BIOL 110 Contemporar)' General Biology (4) 
BIOL 213 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4) 
BIOL 214 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4) 
BIOL 215 Fundamentals of Microbiology (4) 

or 
BIOL 3 1 5 Medical Microbiology (4) 
'CHEM 105 Chemistn,- for Allied Health Professions I (4) 
•'CHEM 106 Chemistn,' for Allied Health Professions II (4) 

HLTH 331 Nutrition for Health Professionals (3) 
*MATH 115 Basic Mathematics for Sciences (3) 
'PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) 
*PSYC203 Human Development (3) 
'SOCI 101 Introductory Sociology (3) 

REQUIRED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE NURSING MAJOR 
Junior Year 
First Term 

NURS 330 Professional Nursmg: Bridge (3)* 
NURS 331 Professional Nursing I: Introduction (2) 
NURS 341 Alterations in Health (3) 
NURS 343 Pharmacotherapeutic Agents (2) 
NURS 345 Technology and Therapeutic Interventions (2) 
NURS 347 Health Assessment Across the Life Span (3) 
NURS 351 Nursing Practice I: Health Promorion Across the 
Life Span (4) 



Second Term 

NURS 353 
NURS 355 
NURS 404 

NURS 416 
MATH 231 

MATH 237 

PSYC212 

Senior Year 

First Term 
NURS 431 
NURS 451 

NURS 453 
NURS 404 



Nursing Practice II: Adult Health (5) 

Nursing Practice III: Childbearing Families (5) 

Health Care: An Interdisciplinary Approach (3) 

or 

Multicultural Health Care (3) (GenEd) 

Basic Statistics (3) 

or 

Biostatistics (3-4) 

or 

Behavioral Statistics (4) 



Professional Nursing II: Research (2) 

Nursing Practice IV: Psychiatric and 

Mental Health (5) 

Nursing Practice V: Child Health (5) 

Health Care: An Interdisciplinary Approach (3) 



NURS 416 Multicultural HcaUh Care (3) (GenEd) 



Second Term 

NURS 433 

NURS 455 
NURS 457 
NURS 459 

•RNsonlv 



Professional Nursing III: Issues 
(Advanced Writing GenEd) (3) 
Nursing Practice VI: Community Health (5) 
Nursing Practice VII: Clinical Practicum (2) 
Nursing Practice VIII: Leadership and 
Management (4) 



Department of Nursing 



137 



ADMISSION TO THE ^aJRSING MAJOR 

Before students can be considered for admission to the Nursing 
major, they must be admitted to or have appUed for admission to 
the university. Transfer students must adhere to the university's 
transfer pohcies. 

Admission to the Nursing major is granted only by the depart- 
ment. Admission to the university does not constitute or guarantee 
admission to the major. Students are admitted in both the fall and 
spring terms of each academic year. The application for admission 
to the Nursing major is available from the admissions coordinator. 
It is to be returned to the admissions coordinator, Department of 
Nursing, by January 15 for fall admission and August 15 for spring 
admission. Because the process requires official transcripts from all 
educational institutions that students have attended, students 
should allow sufficient time for receipt of transcripts in the depart- 
ment by the due date. Late applications are accepted on a space- 
available basis. 

EARLY ADMISSION POLICY 

Pre-nursing students who have completed their freshman year at 
Towson University, have an overall GPA of at least 3.30, and no 
more than one course grade less than a 2.00 may apply for early 
admission to the Nursing major. Early admission will give them 
"Guaranteed Admission Status," which will ensure them a place in 
the program in the term they are ready to enter. In order to main- 
tain this status, the student must maintain a GPA of 3.30 and all 
course grades must be 2.00 or higher. Students who have 
"Guaranteed Admission Status" and have grades that fall below 
these criteria may still be accepted into the program, but need to be 
re-evaluated with the rest of the group applying for that term. 
Students interested in pursuing admission under this policy are 
urged to contact the admissions coordinator at 410-704-4170. 

INDIVIDUAL ADMISSION POLICY 

Applicants who do not meet the admission criteria may still be con- 
sidered for admission under the individual admission policy. To be 
considered, the individual must demonstrate the ability to be suc- 
cessful in a rigorous academic curriculum through recent strong 
academic performance in relevant course work. Applicants who 
wish to be considered under this policy must submit, with the stan- 
dard application, supporting materials makmg a specific, personal- 
ized case of why the applicant deserves acceptance into a rigorous 
academic program. Submitted materials should include a written 
request for consideration, two letters of recommendation from 
appropriate sources, such as professors or academic advisers, and a 
personal statement with supporting materials explaining why the 
applicant deserves special consideration and why his or her qualifi- 
cations do not meet stated criteria. Materials submitted should con- 
tain iiery specific and compelling information to warrant special 
consideration. 

BASIC PROGRAM 

High school students are advised to take the following courses to 
provide the base necessary to complete the prerequisite courses for 
the Nursing major: mathematics - three units (two years of algebra 
and one year of geometry); chemistry - one unit; biology - one 
unit. Physics, although not required, is recommended. 

Eligibility and Screening: Admission to the major is contingent 
upon the student being screened and admission being offered to the 
applicant by the department. The screening process takes place dur- 
ing the term prior to the student's anticipated enrollment in the first 
nursing course. Students are eligible to apply for admission after 
they have completed a minimum of 42 undergraduate units, includ- 
ing at least four laboratory sciences and ENGL 102. Only one 
grade below a grade equivalent of 2.00 is allowed in prerequisite or 
General Education courses, and no more than two courses may be 



repeated. A mmimuni GPA of 2.50 on a 4.00 scale is required; 
however, students must note that achievement at the 2.50 level in 
itself does not guarantee admission to the program. The higher the 
applicant's GPA, the greater the possibility of being offered admission. 

TRANSFER AND SECOND DEGREE STUDENTS 

Transfer students and those seeking a second baccalaureate degree 
are admitted to the university according to university policies and 
procedures. Generally, transfer students must complete all required 
nursing courses of the department at Towson University. Nursing 
courses completed in another baccalaureate nursing program are 
evaluated individually for equivalence by the department. 

REGISTERED NURSE PROGRAM 

To be eligible for admission, students must have graduated from a 
state-approved diploma or associate degree nursing program and 
be licensed as a registered nurse in Maryland. Recent graduates 
may be admitted pending successful completion of the NCLEX- 
RN. Students applying for admission to the Nursing major must 
either have been admitted to the university or be currently seeking 
admission to the university. 

Registered nurse students are advised to contact the department 
for advisement prior to completion and submission of the applica- 
tion for admission to the universit)'. 

Eligibility and screening: Admission to the Nursing Program is 
granted only by the department. Eligibility requirements are 
dependent upon the option chosen. In addition, RN students are 
required to have a minimum GPA of 2.50 on a 4.00 scale. Only one 
grade below a grade equivalent of 2.00 is allowed in the non-nurs- 
ing courses required for the Nursing Program. Students validating 
their basic nursing education through the "transition course" 
option must have completed these courses prior to admission to the 
Nursing major. 

RN ARTICULATION MODEL 

Effective fall 2004, the department will participate in a revised 
statewide articulation model. No more than half of the baccalaure- 
ate degree, with a maximum of 60 non-nursing units, will be 
accepted at Towson from a community college. Nursing units will 
not be transferred. However, individuals with an active unencum- 
bered Maryland or compact RN license articulating to the bac- 
calaureate level are awarded a mmimum of 30 upper-division nursing 
units in the program. 

The total number of units to be completed is 30; however, to 
ensure successful progress through the Nursing major, students will 
need statistics, Chemistry for Allied Health Professions II and 
microbiology. If these courses were not part of the associate's 
degree, they must be completed prior to acceptance into the Nursing 
major — which could add an additional 12 units to the program. 
The baccalaureate Nursing program builds upon the student's pre- 
vious learning, ensures a broad base in the liberal arts, and offers 
nursing courses that are designed to enhance professional nursing 
practice. RNs are advised to contact the department for assistance 
with admission and program planning. 

HEALTH ASSESSMENT CHALLENGE 
EXAMINATION 

Registered nurses with an extensive background in health assess- 
ment may elect to challenge the course NURS 347 Health 
Assessment Across the Life Span. Students interested in challenging 
the course must first meet with the NURS 347 course coordinator 
to determine the extent of their health assessment background and 
receive specific information regarding the challenge option. 



138 



The College of Health Professions 



ACADEMIC STANDARDS 

Students are required to maintain a GPA of 2.50 to enroll in clini- 
cal courses in the major. A grade of 2.00 or higher in both the the- 
ory and clinical component in each nursing course is required, in 
addition to maintaining a 2.00 overall GPA. 

Effective fall 2003, new students entering or re-entering the pro- 
gram must earn the national average composite score on a national 
examination as specified by the Department of Nursing (currently 
the RN Assessment Test published by Education Resources, Inc.) 
during their senior year, second term, in order to be eligible to sit 
for the NCLEX-RN examination required for licensure. 

The Nursing Student Handbook provides additional information 
concerning department policies and is distributed upon enrollment 
in the major. 

SPECIAL FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS 

All students in the Nursing major are required to: 

• carry Nursing student liabilit)' insurance through the university 

• carry hospitalization insurance including accident and/or emer- 
gency benefits 

• purchase departmental uniforms and supplies (approximately 
$700 for basic students and $200 for RN students) 

• have a valid driver's license and access to the independent use 
of a car in order to provide own travel to and from clinical 
facilities 

• assume financial responsibilit)- for expenses related to the 
required physical examination and laboratory/screening tests 
Information about financial assistance may be obtained from the 

university's Office of Financial Aid. 

Information sessions are offered throughout the year. For addi- 
tional information, contact the admissions coordinator. 




Department of Occupational 
Therapy and Occupational Science 

Professors: Karen Eskow, Charlotte Exner, Regena Stevens- 

Ratchford, S. Maggie Reitz (Chair) 
Associate Professors: Janet DeLany, MaryBeth Merryman, 

Marcie Weinstein 
Assistant Professors: Sonia Lawson, Jenna Yeager 
Clinical Assistant Professors: Lynne Murphy, Marlene Riley 
Part-time Faculty: Lisa Fagan 
Visiting Instructor: Kathy Murphy 
Lecturers: Barbara Demchick, Macyanne Sacco-Peterson 

OFFICE 

Lida Lee Tall 305, 410-704-2762 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Occupational therapy is the art and science of directing human par- 
ticipation in selected occupations to restore, reinforce and enhance 
performance, facilitate learning of skills and functions essential for 
adaptation and productivity, diminish or correct pathology, and 
promote and maintain health. Occupational therapists direct the 
use of self-care, work, homemaking, play, leisure, art and occupa- 
tion. They use these activities to assist individuals or groups whose 
health is threatened or impaired by developmental deficits, aging, 
poverty, environmental conditions, physical injury, illness, or psy- 
chological and social disability. 

The Department of Occupational Therapy and Occupational 
Science currently offers a Combined B.S./M.S. program designed to 
provide a liberal education and develop professional competence. 
The program of study leads to a Combined B.S./M.S. degree in 
Occupational Therapy. The Occupational Therapy Program is 
accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy 
Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy 
Association (AOTA) located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 
31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220. AOTA's phone number is 301- 
652-2682. Graduates of the program will be able to sit for the 
national certification examination for the occupational therapist 
administered by the National Board for Certification in 
Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of 
this exam, the individual will be an Occupational Therapist, 
Registered (OTR). Most states require licensure in order to prac- 
tice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the 
NBCOT certification examination. (Persons convicted of felonies 
may be unable to sit for the certification examination and should 
inquire in advance of program entry regarding eligibility.) 

Occupational therapy is a profession that demands its practi- 
tioners have clinical competencies as well as academic knowledge. 
In addition to satisfactory completion of course work, students 
must demonstrate appropriate professional behaviors and skills 
prior to beginning clinical/internship experiences. Students who 
have lower than a 3.00 GPA will not be permitted to enroll in 
OCTH 435/436. In the event that students lack appropriate pro- 
fessional behaviors and/or skills and/or do not have satisfactory 
academic performance in one or more required courses, recom- 
mendations for remedial courses of action will be made. 

Students are expected to be aware of and adhere to the C^ode of 
Ethics established by the department. Violation of the standards set 
forth in this document is cause for disciplinary action which may 
include dismissal from the programs offered by the Department of 
Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science. 

The department also offers a Master of Science degree in 
Occupational Therapy and a Doctor of Occupational Science 
(Sc.D.). For further information, consult the Graduate Catalog. 



Department of Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science 



139 



PROGRAM AND FIELDWORK REQUIREMENTS 
Health and Insurance Requirements 

Contracts with fieldwork facihties require that students in place- 
ments show proof of current health insurance and documentation 
of current health status. The findings of the health examination will 
not necessarily exclude students from placement. Students must 
present evidence of current health insurance, a recent health exam- 
ination, a speech and hearing screening and results of a P.P.D. test 
prior to enrollment in the first fieldwork experience. Speech and 
hearing screening is offered free of charge through the Towson 
University Speech and Hearing Clinic each term. Annual updates 
are required. Students must also complete the Hepatitis B vaccine 
series including the results of a titer or sign a declination form for 
the vaccine. 

CPR Courses and First Aid 

Certification for adult, infant and child CPR is required prior to 
beginning the program. Proof of current CPR certification is 
required during enrollment in the major. Online courses are not 
accepted. It is highly recommended that students complete a stan- 
dard course in first aid. 

Criminal Background Check 

Students may be required to obtain a criminal background check if 
required by the fieldwork site. This can occur for any Level I or 
Level II fieldwork experience. The student is responsible for this 
expense. 

PRE-ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR 
ALL CANDIDATES 

Admission to the university does not guarantee admission to the 
Occupational Therapy major. At students' request, occupational 
therapy and occupational science faculty and administrative staff 
will advise candidates about the nature of the profession, the 
national certification examination, and the occupational therapy 
curriculum prior to admission. 

APPLICATION CRITERLA 

Applicants are encouraged to contact the department to request a 
Pre-OT adviser. Application materials for the Occupational 
Therapy Program must be submitted to the College of Health 
Professions (CHP) admissions coordinator with a postmark no 
later than March L All students applying for admission to the 
Combined B.S./M.S. Occupational Therapy Program at Towson 
University must meet the following criteria: 

1. Applicants must have applied to Towson University for fall 
admission by February 1. 

2. Applicants must have completed a minimum of 14 units in col- 
lege courses, excluding developmental courses, by the end of 
the fall term preceding screening. 

3. Applicants must have a grade equivalent of 2.67 or higher in 
the following courses or their equivalents completed by 
December 31: 

a. BIOL 110 Contemporary General Biology (must be com- 
pleted by end of fall term preceding screening). 

or BIOL 213 Anatomy and Physiology I (may be substituted 
for BIOL 110 for screening purposes). 

b. Two of the following three courses: 
PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology 
SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology 
ENGL 102 Writing for a Liberal Education 

All of these courses must be completed by the end of the term in 
which screening takes place with a grade equivalent of 2.67 or 
higher. CLEP tests and AP exam scores may be used in lieu of 
course grades. However, scores must be equivalent to the grade 
requirement of a 2.67 or higher, and the courses must be posted on 
the TU transcript. Applicants with lower test scores must take the 



course and achieve a grade equivalent of 2.67 or higher to be con- 
sidered for screening. Applicants with such test scores must contact 
the CHP admissions coordinator for specific information. 

4. Applicants must have a minimum overall GPA of 2.70 by the 
end of the fall term preceding screening. 

5. Applicants must submit the following documents in one pack- 
et postmarked by March 1: 

a. Official transcripts that include course work taken through 
the fall term preceding application to the program at insti- 
tutions other than Towson University. 

b. A completed Human Service Activity Verification Form, 
which provides evidence of completion of at least 30 hours 
of work and/or volunteer experience in a human service 
activity. This work or volunteer experience must have 
involved direct contact with people with disabilities, illness 
or other disadvantages. Examples include work/volunteer 
experience with clients in hospitals, nursing homes, rehabil- 
itation facilities, senior centers, drug rehabilitation pro- 
grams, programs for the homeless, camps, etc. 

c. A typewritten application essay following the guidelines 
provided by the department. 

d. Three reference forms completed by appropriate individuals 
and submitted in accordance with application requirements. 

6. Applicants must have a completed Prerequisite Course Form 
on file by March 1. In addition, applicants who wish to have 
courses not listed on this form approved as equivalent to 
major courses in this program of study must submit a written 
request for approval of these courses. 

7. A minimum of 23 units meeting General Education (GenEd) 
requirements must have been completed prior to beginning the 
first term of the Occupational Therapy Program. 

Applicants with units more than 10 years old may petition (in writ- 
ing by March 1) to have these units excluded from calculation of 
the GPA if they have successfully completed 14 or more units with- 
in the past two years. These 14 units must include either BIOL 110 
Contemporary General Biology or BIOL 213 Anatomy and 
Physiology I (or their equivalent). When this option is approved, all 
units more than 10 years old are excluded from GPA computation, 
with the exception of grades for PSYC 101, SOCI 101, ENGL 102, 
and PHYS 202 or PHYS 211. If applicants wish old screening 
course grade(s) to be omitted, they must have retaken the screening 
course(s) within the past 10 years. If a petition regarding omission 
of these grades is not received by the application deadline, all 
courses more than 10 vears old will be used in computation of the 
GPA. 

APPLICATION PROCESS 

Screening for admission is based on a review of student's GPA, 
admission essay, letters of recommendation and required volunteer 
experience. 

Early Admission to the Major 

High school seniors, current Towson University students, and 
transfer students with an overall GPA of 3.40 may be considered 
for early admission to the Combined B.S./M.S. Occupational 
Therapy Program. Early admission will result in Guaranteed 
Admission Status, which will ensure the student a place in the pro- 
gram with the next class admitted. In order to receive Guaranteed 
Admission Status, applicants need to complete the application 
process and be selected by the program's Admissions Committee. In 
order to enter the program, students must meet all application cri- 
teria, including prerequisite grade requirements and be admitted to 
the university. 

Early admission applicants will be admitted on a first-come, 
first-served rolling admission basis. Applications will continue to 
be accepted until all available spaces are filled. No more than 50 
percent of the class will be filled with early admit students. 



140 



The College of Health Professions 



Applicants will be informed ot the status of their application 
within 30 days. Students interested in pursuing early admission 
under this policy must contact the CHP admissions coordinator, 
410-704-4170. 

First Level of Screening 

Initial screening, which is based on GPA, will occur immediately 
after March 1 for applicants who have complete files. Overall 
GPAs will be computed, and the top 60 applicants will be 
identified. 

Second Level of Screening 

The department's Admissions Committee will review documents of 
the top 60 applicants and evaluate these applicants based upon 
their GPAs, essays and references. The top candidates from this 
pool of applicants will be selected for admission. 

A maximum of 25 percent of the group of applicants selected 
will be out-of-state students, unless qualified in-state students are 
unavailable. 

Selection of the top candidates will be completed by April 15. 
After May 15 a waiting list will be developed consisting of other 
applicants from the original pool of 60 who were not accepted but 
wish to remain on the waiting list for classes beginning that fall 
term. The top candidate on that list is notified if a place becomes 
available in the class. If that candidate cannot accept the place, the 
next candidate is notified. The waiting list is maintained until the 
end of the drop-add period in the fall and does not carry over into 
the next year. 

MAJOR IN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

In addition to the General Education requirements. Occupational 
Therapy majors must complete 70 units in occupational therapy 
courses, 22 units in other required courses and 21 units in clinicals 
and internships. Additional elective units may be required to earn 
the total of 120 units necessary for the B.S. degree and to meet the 
requirements of the M.S. degree. Courses applicable toward the 
major may not be taken under the Pass grading option. 

Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 fol- 
lowing admission into the Occupational Therapy major. By the 
end of the term preceding OCTH 435, students must achieve and 
maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.00, and consistently demonstrate 
professional behaviors and necessary competencies to enroll in 
OCTH 435. Students must then have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 to 
be admitted into the graduate portion of the occupational therapy 
program. A grade equivalent of 1.67 or lower in a required course 
will not count toward major unit. Students receiving a grade equiv- 
alent of 1.67 or lower in a major course or a U in OCTH 435/436 
may retake the course once to improve their standing. Failure of 
OCTH 435 or 436 (U grade) may result in denial of readmission. 

After advancement to graduate student status. Occupational 
Therapy Combined B.S./M.S. students must meet all department 
and Graduate School academic standards and policies. 



Special Permits 

Special permits are required for admission to all 
Therapy major courses. 



Occupational 



COMBINED BACHELOR'S/MASTER'S DECREE 
PROGRAM 

Prerequisites 

BIOL 1 10 Contemporary General Biology (4) 

ENGL 102 Writing for a Liberal Education (3) 

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) 

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) 



First Term 
OCTH 211 
OCTH 216 
OCTH 217 
BIOL 213 

Second Term 

PSYC 361 
OCTH 213 
OCTH 218 
BIOL 214 
BIOL 427 

Summer 

MATH 237 

MATH 231 
PSYC 212 

Third Term 

OCTH 221 
OCTH 314 
OCTH 320 
PHYS 202 

Fourth Term 

OCTH 313 
OCTH 317 
OCTH 319 
OCTH 323 
HLTH 207 

Fifth Term 
OCTH 325 
OCTH 326 
OCTH 428 
OCTH 430 

Sixth Term 
OCTH 435 
OCTH 436 



Philosophy of Occupational Therapy (3) 
Life Span Adaptations and Occupations (4) 
Analysis of Occupational Performance I (4) 
Anatomy and Physiology I (4) 



Abnormal Psychology (3) 

Small Group Dynamics (3) 

Analysis of Occupational Performance II (3) 

Anatomy and Physiology II (4) 

Neuromuscular Mechanisms (2) 



Biostatistics (4) 

or 

Basic Statistics (3) 

or 

Behavioral Statistics (4) 



Clinical Kinesiology (3) 
Psychosocial Dysfunction (4) 
Psychosocial Function Clinical (3) 
General Physics for the Health Sciences (5) 



Physical Function: Neurological Conditions (3) 
Physical Function: Musculoskeletal Conditions (3) 
Physical Dysfunction: Clinical (3) 
Gerontological OT (3) 
Health Care in the U.S. (3) 



Pediatric Occupational Therapy (4) 

Pediatric Clinical (2) 

Occupational Therapy Organizations in Modern Sociery (4) 

Research Methods in Occupational Therapy (3) 



Occupational Therapy Internship I (6) 
Occupational Therapy Internship II (6) 



PORTFOLIO REVIEW/ADVANCEMENT TO GRADUATE 
STUDENT STATUS 



Summer 
OCTH 611 
PSYC 687 

Seventh Term 
OCTH 603 
OCTH 612 

OCTH 613 



Minimester 



Eighth Term 

OCTH 678 
OCTH 781 



Summer 

OCTH 897 



Advanced Theory and Philosophy of Occupation (3) 
Advanced Experimental Design I (3) 



Issues in Occupational Therapy (3) 

Occupational Therapy Health Promotion Initiatives in the 

Community: Clinical (3) 

Advanced Research Methods in Occupation-Based 

Practice (3) 



'Graduate elective (3) 
'Graduate elective (3) 



Assessment Through the Lifespan (3) 
Graduate Seminar (3) 
'Graduate elective (3) 
•Graduate elective (3) 



Graduate Project (3) 

'Graduate elective (3) 
'Graduate electives can be moved to an alternate term and/or taken during 
the winter or summer sessions. 

All OT students must complete Level II Fieldwork within 24 
months following completion of academic preparation. 



Department of Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science 



141 



In addition to the above courses, students are required to com- 
plete all GenEd requirements during regular terms or summer ses- 
sions. Students must complete all GenEds by the end of the fifth 
term of the program. 

Students in this program may not take occupational therapy 
courses prior to the terms in which they are scheduled on this plan. 

CERTIFffiD OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

ASSISTANTS 

Certified occupational therapy assistants may ask to have courses 
taken in fulfillment of their degree reviewed to determine if any of 
these courses may substitute for required 200-level courses in the 
Occupational Therapy Program of study at Towson University. 
Depending upon type and number of courses accepted as equiva- 
lent to TU courses, permission to complete the academic program 
in four terms of academic course work and six months of fieldwork 
may be granted. Students who wish to be considered for this option 
must notif\' the department in writing of their request and must 
provide course descriptions. 



DOCTOR OF SCIENCE IN OCCUPATIONAL 
SCIENCE (Sc.D.) 

The applied doctoral degree in Occupational Science prepares cer- 
tified occupational therapists to teach and influence policy, and 
engage in applied research. Occupational science is the scientific 
study of human occupation related to the purposeful and meaning- 
ful activities that comprise every^day life experiences. The study of 
occupation involves the investigation of the relationship between 
humans' occupations and their health. This unique social science 
examines the capacity of humans to engage in occupation and 
develop healthy adaptive skills. The main emphasis of this doctoral 
program is to enhance the health of society by applying knowledge 
gained through the advanced study of occupational science and 
human behavior For more information, consult the Graduate 
Catalog. 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN 
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

The Master of Science in Occupational Therapy is designed for 
individuals with bachelor's degrees who are interested in assuming 
leadership roles in the profession and obtaining advanced educa- 
tion with emphasis on teaching, research or clinical practice. 
Specialization in Administration, Education, Gerontology, 
Pediatrics or other approved specialty areas is also offered. Those 
individuals who are not occupational therapists must be screened 
for admission to the pre-occupational therapy component of the 
program and must successfully complete prerequisite courses prior 
to enrolling in graduate degree program occupational therapy 
courses. For funher information, consult the Graduate Catalog. 





The College of Liberal Arts 



The liberal arts are the core disciplines of the university, those disciplines through which 
students explore and interpret what it means to be human, both as individuals and as members 
of groups. Study of the liberal arts frees us to think more clearly, to analyze and interpret infor- 
mation, to weigh points of view, to arrive at informed judgments about complex issues, and to 
appreciate the rich diversity of human culture. 

The College of Liberal Arts is committed to providing a comprehensive opportunity for 
undergraduate and graduate instruction. The liberal arts curriculum helps students develop the 
abilit}' to aiudyze and interpret information arul opinions objectively, form and express conclu- 
sions creatively, express themselves clearly, appreciate the wide diversity- of human culture, and 
move comfortably in the world of ideas and values. Degree programs in the College of Liberal 
Arts emphasize professional career opportunities and interdisciplinary study, as well as more 
traditional theoretical aspects of the disciplines. 

Teaching 

While using effective traditional teaching methods. Towson has also been in the forefront 
of innovation in instruction. The college supports small classes, an emphasis on writing and 
personal attention to students. College of Liberal Ans faculty are in the forefront of curriculum 
innovation in writing instruction, in infusion of material on cultural diversity, and in the use of 
technology to expand and enrich learning. 

Scholarship 

Commitment to undergraduate education is reflected not only in leaching excellence, but 
also in the faculty's active involvement in scholarly activity and professional growth, including 
publications, presentations at professional meetings, and participation in regional, national, and 
international conferences and workshops. Opportunities also exist for students to become 
involved in collaborative research with faculty, further developing students ' academic and per- 
sonal growth while providing new avenues for the College of Liberal Arts to meet the challenge 
of continued excellence in education. 

Service 

The College of Liberal Arts serves the metropolitan community in many ways, contributing 
to its cultural life and social progress. The departments, centers and institutes of the college 
develop creative partnerships with public arul private enterprises that ensure the intellectual 
resources of the institution are fully engaged in ways that are mutually beneficial and ser\x' the 
people of the Baltimore metropolitan area. Within the university, faculty of the college sen'e on 
the essential committees, governing bodies, and task forces that promote the educational mis- 
sions of the university. 



Rila D. Marinho. Dean 

Irena S. M. Makarushka, Associate Dean 



Cultural Studies 

English 

Environmental Science and Studies 

Family Studies 

Geography and Environmental Planning 

Geography and Land Surveying 

Gerontology 

History 

Interdisciplinary Studies 

African and African American Studies 
Minor 

American Studies 

Animal Behavior 

Asian Studies 

Business, Communication and the 
Liberal Arts Minor 

Classical Studies Minor 

Comparative Ethnic Studies Minor 

Irish Studies Minor 

Jewish Studies Minor 

Latin American Studies 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender 
Studies Minor 

Prelaw 
International Studies 
Law and American Civilization 
Metropolitan Studies 
Modern Languages 

French 

German 

Spanish 
Philosophy 
Political Science 
Psychology 
Religious Studies 
Social Sciences 
Sociology- Anthropology 

Sociology 

Anthropology 

Criminal justice 
Women's Studies 

COLLEGE OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 108,410-704-2128 

Fax:410-704-6392 

www.towson.edu/cla/ 



Cultural Studies Program 



143 



Cultural Studies Program 

Directors: Sam Collins [Sociology. Anthropology atui Criminal 
Justice) 

Affiliated Faculty: Peter Baker (English), Jennifer Ballengee 
(English), David Bergman (English), Carolyn Hill (English), 
Susan Isaacs (Art), Peter Lev (Electronic Media and Film), Paul 
Miers (English), John Murungi {Philosophy and Religious 
Studies), Gerald Phillips (Music), Darcy Plymire (Kinesiology), 
Paul Pojman (Philosophy and Religious Studies), Katia Sainson 
(Modern Languages), Deborah Shaller [English), Sarah Sobjeraj 
(Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice) 

OFFICE 

Lmthicum Hall 301F, 410-704-2657 
www.towson.edu/clst/ 

THE PROGRAM 

Cultural Studies is a growing field of inquiry that explores cultural 
practices in relation to history, economics, society, and to other cul- 
tural productions. It examines everyday life in whatever form it 
finds: arts, media, texts, performances, institutions, communica- 
tions, structures of power, and it looks at the ways we create, cir- 
culate and resist meanings. Cultural Studies programs cross disci- 
plines in order to engage contexts like gender and sexuality, class, 
race and ethnicity, globalization and national identity. 

MAJOR IN CULTURAL STUDIES 

Majors in Cultural Studies must complete 42-45 units of course 
work drawn from throughout the curriculum of the university, 
including an introductory course (3 units) and core requirements 
(18 units), 18 units of elective courses distributed among four of 
the six focus areas for cultural study (Visual Culture, Performance 
Culture, Identity and Culture, Textuality and Culture, Science, 
Technology and Culture, and Perspectives in Cultural Studies) and 
a seminar and/or capstone experience. 

I. Introductory Course (3 units) 

CLST 201 Introduction to Cultural Studies (3) 

II. Core Courses (18 units) 

CLST 301 Perspectives in Global Culture (3) 

CLST 303 Identity and Culture (3) 

CLST 305 Textualitv and Culture (3) 

CLST 307 Visual Culture (3) 

CLST 309 Performance Culture (3) 

CLST 311 Science, Technology and Culture (3) 

III. Electives (18 units) 

CLST 370-75 Topics in Cultural Studies (3) 

At least four courses from the following groups: 

A. Perspectives in Cultural Studies 

ANTH 346 Wealth, Power and Politics (3) 
ANTH 361 Controversies in Anthropology (3) 
ECON 321 History of Economic Thought (3) 
ENGL 270 The American Dream (3) 

B. Identity and Culture 

ANTH 321 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3) 

ANTH 366 Indians of South America (3) 

ANTH 388 Peasant Cultures (3) 

ENGL 236 Survey of American Indian Literature 1772-Present (3) 

LGST 101 Introduction to Lesbian and Gay Studies (3) 

PSYC 447 Sex Differences; Psychological Perspectives (3) 

SOCI 343 Minority Groups (3) 

SPAN 312 Spanish Culture and Civilization II (3) 

WMST 332 Women's Culture and Creativity (3) 



C. Textuality and Culture 

ENGL 462 Modern Literary Theory (3) 

D. Visual Culture 

ARTH 207 Honors Seminar in Western Art (3) 
ARTH 208 Honors Seminar in Non-Western Art (3) 
ARTH 311 Northern Renaissance Art (3) 
ARTH 331 The Art of China (3) 
ARTH 333 The Art of Japan (3) 
ARTH 335 African-American Art (3) 
ARTH 337 American Art (3) 
ARTH 341 Women in Art (3) 
ARTH 351 History of Photography (3) 
ARTH 485 Seminar (Art and Theor)' Post-1945 and 
20th-century Craft) (3) 

E. Performance Culture 

KNES 353 Sport and Society (3) 

KNES357 Sport in Film (3) 

KNES 349 The Modern Olympic Games (3) 

SOCI 210 Sociology of Sport (3) 

THEA 303 Cultural Diversity in Contemporary Theatre (3) 

THEA 307 Theories of Theatre (3) 

WMST 338 Women and Sexuality (3) 

F. Science, Technologv and Culture 

NURS 406 Multicultural Health Care (3) 
WMST 336 Women and Medicine (3) 
WRIT 335 Ethics in the Physical Sciences (3) 

rV. Seminar and/or Capstone Experience (3-6 units) 
Students have three options to choose from to fulfill this stage of 
the Cultural Studies Program. In all options, the student will 
research and write a major essay or report and exhibit an integrated 
knowledge of cultural studies. First, students may participate in an 
internship in the workplace approved and supervised by the direc- 
tor of the Cultural Studies Program. Second, the student may 
enroll in a senior seminar which will focus on an aspect of cultur- 
al studies. Third, the student may engage in independent study 
approved by the Cultural Studies director. 

MINOR IN CULTURAL STUDIES 

The minor in Cultural Studies is designed to enhance and supple- 
ment students' studies in a number of other areas, including 
anthropology, education, English, and mass communication. In 
these areas of study, the fundamental questions posed by cultural 
studies give students a broader, more critical look at the interac- 
tions between their fields of study and society as a whole. It may 
also provide a useful complement to any undergraduate program 
of study. 

The Program 

Students minoring in Cultural Studies must complete 18 units, 
including the introductory course (3 units) and three of the 
Electives — Group I (9 units), and two Electives — Group II, one 
of which must be upper-level. Students must earn a grade equiva- 
lent of 2.00 or higher in all courses in the minor. 

Introductory Course (3 units) 

CLST 101 Introduction to Cultural Studies (3) 

Electives — Group I (9 units) 

Three courses from the following: 

CLST 301 Perspectives in Global Culture (3) 

CLST 303 Identity and Culture (3) 

CLST 305 Textualitv- and Culture (3) 

CLST 307 Visual Culture (3) 

CLST 309 Performance Culture (3) 

CLST 311 Science, Technology and Culture (3) 



144 



The College of Liberal Arts 



Electives — Group II (6 units) 

Two courses from the following, one of tvhich must be upper-level: 

ANTH 321 Gender in Cross-Cultural America (3) 

ANTH 346 Wealth, Power and Politics (3) 

ANTH 361 Controversies in Anthropology (3) 

ANTH 366 Indians of South America (3) 

ANTH 388 Peasant Cultures (3) 

ARTH 207 Honors Seminar in Western Art (3) 

ARTH 208 Honors Seminar in Non-Western Art (3) 

ARTH 311 Northern Renaissance Art (3) 

ARTH 33 1 The Art of Chma (3) 

ARTH 333 The Art of Japan (3) 

ARTH 335 African-American Art (3) 

ARTH 337 American Art (3) 

ARTH 341 Women m An (3) 

ARTH 351 History of Photography (3) 

CLST 370-75 Topics in Cultural Studies (3) 

ECON 321 History of Economic Thought (3) 

ENGL 236 Survey of American Indian Literature, 

1772-Present (3) 

ENGL 270 The American Dream (3) 

ENGL 462 Modern Literary Theory (3) 

IDIS 101 Introduction to Lesbian and Gay Studies (3) 

KNES 353 Sport and Society (3) 

KNES 357 Sport in Film (3)' 

KNES 349 The Modern Olvmpic Games (3) 

NURS 406 Multicultural Health Care (3) 

PSYC 209 Consumer Behavior (3) 

PSYC 447 Sex Differences; Psychological Perspectives (3) 

SOCl 210 Sociolog>' of Sport (3) 

SOCI 343 .Minority Groups (3) 

SPAN 312 Spanish Culture and Civilization I (3) 

THEA 303 Cultural Diversin' in Contemporary Theatre (3) 

THEA 307 Theories of Theatre (3) 

WMST 332 Women's Culture and Creativity (3) 

WMST 336 Women and Medicine (3) 

WMST 338 Women and Sexuality (3) 

WRIT 335 Ethics in the Physical Sciences (3) 



Department of English 

Professors: G. Scott Allen, Evelyn Avery, Peter Baker, Carl Behm, 
David Bergman, Paul Douglas, Edwin Duncan [Chair), John 
Gissendanner, George Hahn, Clarinda Harriss, Carolyn Hill, 
Harvey Lillywhite, Florence Newman, Jacqueline Wilkotz 

Associate Professors: Lena Ampadu, Barbara Bass, John 

Connolly, James Cook, K Edgington, Linda Mahin, Paul Miers, 
John Tinkler, Gary Wood 

Assistant Professors: Jennifer Ballengee, Geoffrey Becker, Frances 
Botkin, Cherv'l Brown, Christopher Cain, David Dayton, Dana 
Phillips, Mariana Portolano 

Instructors: Margaret Benner, John Flynn, Carol Pippen, 
Deborah Shaller 

Lecturer: Judith DeCraene 

Part-time Faculty: Joan Allen, Lynda Anozie, Adam Barkov, Sue 
Bergamy-Willinger, Gary Blankenburg, Ellen Blumner, Alan 
Britt, Jack Carneal, Vivia Chang, Rita Chin, Mary Ann Criss, 
James Curran, Joe Davis, Lynn Dowell, Jeffrey Ellis, Amy Fink, 
Geoffrey Godfrey, Eric Hallengren, Karri Harrison, Steve 
Heaney, Katie Hearn, Ted Hendricks, Sarah James, Wallace 
Johnson, Michael Keating, Dan Keller, Celena Kusch, Kristin 
Leopold, Anthony Mafale, Emily Manus, Margaret Meacham, 
Marci Messick, Leslie Miller, Tracy Miller, Christine Murphy, 
Bradley Paul, Karri Paul, Jared Pratt, Reiner Prochaska, 
Charles Pugh, Benn Ray, Mike Raymond, James Rhodes, 
Nathan Rose, Diane Scharper, Leah Schofield, Gloria Scott, 
Gregorv' Seagle, Donna Sebly, Frank Shivers, Donald Snyder, 
Laurel Strassberger, Linda Suskie, Carmen Walsh 

OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 218K, 410-704-2871 
Fax: 410-704-3999 
www.towson.eduyenglish 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

English offers students pleasure and profit, wit and wisdom, a sense 
of history and a vision of the future. English students know the 
delight of reading the best of British and American literature — 
authors as diverse as Shakespeare and Emily Dickinson, Edgar 
Allan Poe and Virginia Woolf, James Baldwin and John Donne. 
The Department of English provides several programs tailored to 
diverse needs. Students majoring in English can concentrate in 
Writing, Literature or Secondary Education. Students pursuing 
other majors can minor in English, Creative Writing or World 
Literature. 

Each English major or minor chooses or is assigned a faculty 
adviser, who assists the student in creating an individual program 
of study best suited to the student's interest and abilities. The flex- 
ibility of all programs, including majors and minors, allows the stu- 
dent a wide choice of courses within the department and possibili- 
ties for coordinating a program with another academic department. 

The Department of English oversees the master's in Professional 
Writing program, offering unique post-baccalaureate opportunities 
for English majors and minors interested in pursuing careers in cre- 
ative writing, technical writing, editing, public relations and teach- 
ing writing at the community college level. Geoffrey Becker, 410- 
704-5196, coordinates the program. 



Department of English 



145 



MAJOR IN ENGLISH 

English majors must complete 42 units, and each course must be 
completed with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. 

Core Requirements (21 units) 

1. Foundation Courses (12 units) 

ENGL 200 Introduction to Studying English (3) 

ENGL 221 British Literature to 1798 (3) 

ENGL 222 British Literature since 1798 (3) 

ENGL 300 Literary Research and Applied Criticism (3) 

Students are to take ENGL 200 and ENGL 300 prior to taking 
upper-level courses in the major. 

n. American Literature (3 units) 
One of the following: 

ENGL 230 Main Currents in American Literature (3) 

ENGL 231 American Literature to 1865 (3) 

ENGL 232 American Literature since 1865 (3) 

HI. Shakespeare (3 units) 
One oj the following: 

ENGL 426 Topics in Shakespeare Studies (3) 

ENGL 427 Shakespearean Tragedies (3) 

ENGL 428 Shakespearean Comedies (3) 

Secondary Education Concentration majors need the approval of 
their advisers to take ENGL 426. 

IV. Capstone Experience (3 units) 

One of the following in the final year: 

ENGL 485-6 Seminar in English Studies (3) 
ENGL 498 English Internship as Capstone (3) 
ENGL 499 Honors Thesis (3) 

LITERATURE TRACK (21 units) 



WRITING TRACK (21 units) 

I. Language or Criticism (3 units) 
ENGL 416 Editing 
Or 

one of the following: 

ENGL 350 Comparative Grammar (3) 
ENGL 351 Historical Linguistics (3) 
ENGL 353 History of American English (3) 
ENGL 451 History of the English Language (3) 
ENGL 452 Structure of the English Language (3) 
ENGL 461 History of Literary Criticism (3) 
ENGL 462 Modern Literary Theory (3) 
ENGL 475 Topics in Linguisrics (3) 

n. Workshop or Studio Courses (12 units) 

A. At least one of the tolluwing: 
ENGL 310 Writing Argument (3) 
ENGL 313 Academic Essay (3) 
ENGL 315 Literary Essay (3) 

ENGL 316 Writing about Literature (3) 
WMST 333 Women's Words, Women's Lives (3) 

B. Up to three of the following: 
ENGL 311 Writing Poetry (3) 
ENGL 312 Writing Fiction (3) 

ENGL 317 Writing for Business and Industry (3) 

ENGL 318 Advanced Informational Writing'(3) 

ENGL 411 Advanced Writing Poetry (3) 

ENGL 412 Advanced Writing Fiction (3) 

ENGL 417-19 Topics in Writing (3) 

ID. Electives (6 units) 

These must be 300 or 400 level, and at least 3 units must be a lit- 
erature course, not including ENGL 490. It is strongly recom- 
mended that majors fulfill the GenEd II. 3. C requirement with an 
English course, i.e. one of the following: Hi, 234, 235, 239, 247 
or 253. 



I. Linguistics (3 units) 

One of the following: 

ENGL 350 Comparative Grammar (3) 
ENGL 351 Historical Linguistics (3) 
ENGL 353 History of American English (3) 
ENGL 451 History of the English Language (3) 
ENGL 452 Structure of the English Language (3) 
ENGL 475 Topics in Linguistics (3) 

n. Literary Criticism (3 units) 

One of the following: 

ENGL 461 History of Literary Criticism (3) 
ENGL 462 Modern Literary Theory (3) 
ENGL 463 Semiotics (3) 

in. Workshop or Studio Courses (3 units) 
One of the following: 

ENGL 310 Writing Argument (3) 

ENGL 313 Academic Essay (3) 

ENGL 315 Literary Essay (3) 

ENGL 316 Writing about Literature (3) 

W.MST 333 Women's Words, Women's Lives (3) 

IV. Electives (12 units) 

Nine units must be at 300 or 400 level, and 6 units must be litera- 
ture courses, not including ENGL 490. It is strongly recommend- 
ed that majors fulfill the GenEd II. 3. C requirement with an English 
course, i.e., one of the following: 233, 234, 235, 239, 247 or 253. 



SECONDARY EDUCATION TRACK (21 units) 

I. Diversity in American Literature (3 units) 

One of the following: 

ENGL 233 African-American Literature (3) 

ENGL 234 Major Writers in African-American Literature (3) 

ENGL 235 Ethnic American Literature (3) 

ENGL 236 American Indian Literature (3) 

ENGL 239 Jewish Literature of the 19th and 20th Centuries (3) 

ENGL 471-477Topics in Literature (when appropriate) (3) 

n. Linguistics and Grammar (6 units) 

A. Grammar: 

ENGL 251 Applied Grammar (3) 
Students who place out of this course through departmental examination 
are to take in its place an upper-division elective in literature. 

B. One of the following: 

ENGL 350 Comparative Grammar (3) 

ENGL 351 Historical Linguistics (3) 

ENGL 353 History of American English (3) 

ENGL 451 History of the English Language (3) 

ENGL 452 Structure of the English Language (3) 

ENGL 475 Topics in Linguistics (3) 

ni. World Literature/Non-Western Literature (3 units) 

ENGL 243 Introduction to Classical Mythology (3) 

ENGL 244 World Folklore (31 

ENGL 248 Literature of the Global Experience (3) 

ENGL 341 History and Literature of the Old Testament (3) 

ENGL 342 Folklore and Literature (3) 

ENGL 343 Myth and Literature (3) 

ENGL 347 World Literature Written in English (3) 



146 



The College of Liberal Arts 



rV. Advanced Writing (3 units) 
One of the following: 

ENGL 310 Writing Argument (3) 

ENGL 313 Academic Essay (3) 

ENGL 315 Litcran,' Essay (3) 

ENGL 316 Writing about Literature (3) 

WMST HI Women's Words, Women's Lives (3) 

V. Textual Analysis (3 units) 

ENGL 463 Semiotics (3) 

VI. Electives (3 units, 300- or 400-level) 

Students in the Secondary Education program should he aware of 
the formal admission requirements for Secondary Education, and 
should determine what courses are permitted before formal admis- 
sion. (See the Department of Secondary Education section of this 
catalog.) 

MINOR IN CREATIVE WRITING 

Recognizing that all good writing is an act of imagination, order- 
ing, and synthesis that transcends subject-matter boundaries, the 
Creative Writing minor is designed for students with academic con- 
centrations outside the field of English who desire to develop their 
present writing skills beyond those specifically geared to their cho- 
sen disciplines, and to do this under the super\ision of profession- 
al writers. 

Students minoring in Creative Writing must complete 24 units 
with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher in each course. At least 
15 units must be earned at the 300-400 level. Courses should be 
selected in consultation with the student's minor adviser in the 
Department of English. Students are encouraged to complete 
ENGL 102 as soon as possible. 

Core Requirements (12-15 units) 

Select at least four courses in creative writing from the following: 

ENGL 283 Introduction to Creative Writing (3) 

ENGL 311 Writing Poetrv (3) 

ENGL 312 Writing Fiction (3) 

ENGL 315 Literary Essay (3) 

(recommended for students who do not fulfill the GenEd 

I.D requirement with a course in their major) 
ENGL 41 1 .-Advanced Poetry Writing (3) 
ENGL 412 Advanced Fiction Writing (3) 
ENGL 417 Topics in Writing (3) 

(may be selected only when the topic pertains to 

creative writing) 
ENGL 490 Independent Study (3) 

(may be selected only when the topic pertains to 

creative writing) 

Forinal Study of a Genre (3 units) 

Select one course from the following: 
ENGL 261 Tradition and Form in Western Poetry (3) 
ENGL 263 Tradition and Form in Western Fiction (3) 
ENGL 265 Tradition and Form m Western Drama (3) 

Literature Courses (6-9 units) 

Select at least tivo courses in literature. One of these courses must 

be at the 300-400 level. 

MINOR IN ENGLISH 

Students must complete 24 units with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or 
higher in each course, including ENGL 102 Writing for a Liberal 
Education, 6 units of 200-level courses, 6 units of upper- or lower- 
level courses, and 9 units of upper-level courses. No specific courses 
or blocks of courses are stipulated for the minor; each student 
works with a departmental adviser to design a coherent and pur- 
poseful individual program. 



ENGL 102 


ENGL 190 


ENGL 240 


ENGL 248 


Three of the 


ENGL 342 


ENGL 343 


ENGL 344 


ENGL 347 


ENGL 348 


ENGL 373-9 


ENGL 439 


ENGL 441 


ENGL 442 


ENGL 443 


ENGL 46 1 


ENGL 462 


ENGL 471 



MINOR IN WORLD LITERATURE 

Students minoring in World Literature must complete 24 units with 
a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher in each course. Twelve units 
must be taken at the 300-400 level. Courses should be selected in 
consultation with students' Department of English minor advisers. 

Core Requirements (9 units) 

Writing for a Liberal Education (3) 

or 

Honors Wriring Seminar (3) 

Classics of the Western Heritage (3) 

Literature of the Global Experience (3) 

following courses (9 units) 

Folklore and Literature (3) 

.Myth and Literature (3) 

Continental Drama (3) 

World Literature Written in English (3) 

Post-Colonial Literature (3) 

Themes in Literature (when the subject is appropriate) (3) 

Modern World Poetry (3) 

Modern Fiction to World War II (3) 

.Modern Fiction since World War II (3) 

Short Fiction in World Literature (3) 

History of Literary Criticism (3) 

.Modern Literary Theory (3) 

Topics in World Literature (3) 

Electives 

Electives may be chosen from the courses listed above or from 
other courses in British and American literature, folklore, mythol- 
ogy, ethnic literature or literary criticism selected in consultation 
with the student's minor adviser. With the permission of the minor 
adviser and the Department of English chairperson, up to 6 units 
may be taken in literature courses taught in a foreign language. 
These courses are offered through the Department of Modern 
Languages; course descriptions may be found under the listings for 
the specific language. 

The Portfolio 

Students may be asked in their senior year to submit portfolios of 
a few papers that cover their years in the major. These portfolios 
are used anonymously to learn how well the major is working for 
its students. Students themselves will not be assessed; their stand- 
ing will not be affected in any way. The English program will be 
assessing itself through what it finds students are learning. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES 

Course prerequisites are noted in the course descriptions. The 
department strictly enforces prerequisites. 

MEETING GENERAL EDUCATION 
REQUIREMENTS/COMPETENCY 

Every student in the university must complete ENGL 102 or ENGL 
190 with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher in each course to satish,' 
the GenEd LA requirement. 

Students may take additional courses to complete GenEd 
requirements. Many 200-level and some 300-level courses fulfill 
GenEd requirements. 

Philosophy, art, history, speech and theatre GenEd courses pro- 
vide especially effective background for an English major. Students 
are encouraged to select elective courses in these areas in addition 
to those which fulfill GenEd requirements. 

Students mav select anv of the following advanced writing cours- 
es to fulfill GenEd I.D: ENGL 310; ENGL 313; ENGL 315; ENGL 
316; ENGL 317; ENGL 318. Students may, of course, take addi- 
tional elective units in English. 

Some students will be required to complete special competency 
courses in language and writing in addition to meeting GenEd 
requirements in English. Students for whom English is not a native 



Environmental Science and Studies Program 



147 



language may be required to complete courses in English as a 
Second Language as a prerequisite to enrollment in ENGL 102 
Writing for a Liberal Education (see International Undergraduate 
Admissions). Students whose entering scores indicate they need 
additional preparation to meet the standards of college-level expos- 
itory writing will be required to complete DVWR 101 Preparation 
for College Writing, as prerequisite to enrollment in ENGL 102. 
Students must earn a grade of S or a grade equivalent of 2.00 or 
higher in the Developmental Writing course they are required to 
take before they are eligible to enroll in ENGL 102. See the 
Academic Achievement Center section in Academic Resources. 

TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

The Department of English accepts English credits from accredited 
colleges and universities. However, to meet GenEd requirements, 
students must either present 3 transfer credits in a college-level 
composition course, with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher, or 
earn a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher in ENGL 102 or ENGL 
190 at Towson University. Students registering in the department's 
major and minor programs must complete a minimum of 12 units 
in Department of English offerings at Towson University. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT AND CREDIT FOR 
PRIOR LEARNING 

The department awards units through the Advanced Placement 
Program of the university. Also, a selected number of entering 
freshmen are placed in ENGL 190 rather than ENGL 102. The 
department offers units for most courses, other than upper-level 
writing courses, through the Credit for Prior Learning Program. 
Students applying for credit under this program complete an exam- 
ination, an interview and at least one paper in the area. 

ENGLISH HONORS AND ACTIVITIES 

The department participates in the Honors Program. As a member 
of the Honors College, the department offers a number of intensive 
introductory seminars for qualified students. It also sponsors 
departmental honors whereby students pursue independent study 
leading to the completion of a thesis. Students interested in depart- 
mental honors should consult the chair of the department no later 
than the first term of their junior year. Honors are designated on 
the graduate's transcript and diploma. 

By a vote of the English faculty, the outstanding graduate in the 
department receives the Gerry Buettner Award at Commencement. 
By departmental vote, the Fil Dowling Award goes to the year's 
outstanding English Education major. By selection of the joint 
English/Women's Studies committee, the Frank W. Guess Award is 
given to the year's outstanding portfolio of student writing. By 
selection of the English department committee, the Margery W. 
Harriss "Great Starts" Award is presented to the year's outstand- 
ing portfolio of first-year writing (ENGL 102 or ENGL 190). 

Lambda Iota Tau is the national literary honor society with a 
chapter in the department, and the English Club is an informal 
association of majors, minors and professors who meet to exchange 
ideas about literature. 

Students may publish in the Towson University literary publication 
Grub Street. 

DOUBLE MAJOR PROGRAM 

Students who major in one of the other programs of the universi- 
ty but feel a strong interest in language, literature or writing are 
urged to explore the value of completing a double major with their 
adviser or with the chair of the Department of English. 



Environmental Science and 
Studies Program 

Director: Jane L. Wolfson 

Affiliated Faculty, Environmental Studies: Daniel Agley (Health 
Science), Kent Barnes [Geography and Eni'ironniental 
Planning), Lillian Carter {Health Science), James Dorn 
{Economics), Kenneth Haddock {Geography and 
Environmental Planning), Toni Marzotto {Political Science), 
Jeffrey Michael (£co??oot!«), John Morgan {Geography and 
Em>iro>miental Planning), Dennis Muniak {Political Science), 
Harvey Paul {Economics), Paul Pojman {Philosophy and 
Religious Studies), Thomas Rhoads (Economics), Martin 
Roberge {Geography and Environmental Planning), Stephen 
Scales {Philosophy and Religious Studies). Ralph Scott 
(Geography and Environmental Planning), Timothy Sullivan 
(Economics) 

Affiliated Faculty, Environmental Science: Rachel Burks (Physics, 
Astronomy and Geosciences), Ryan Casey (Chemistry), 
Nordulf Debye (Chemistry), Brian Fath (Biological Sciences), 
Jonathan Filer (Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences), Donald 
Forester (Biological Sciences), Susan Gresens (Biological 
Sciences), Sarah Haines (Biological Sciences), James Hull 
(Biological Sciences), Scott Johnson (Biological Sciences), David 
Larkin (Chemistry), Steven Lev (Physics, Astronomy and 
Geosciences), Jay Nelson (Biological Sciences), Roland Roberts 
(Biological Sciences), Gerald Robinson (Biological Sciences), 
Lev Ryzhkov (Chemistry), Aubrey Scarbrough (Biological 
Sciences), Erik Scully (Biological Sciences), Richard Seigel 
(Biological Sciences), Colleen Sinclair (Biological Sciences), 
Joel Snodgrass (Biological Sciences), Joseph Topping 
(Chemistry), David Vanko (Physics, Astronomy and 
Geosciences), Jane Wolfson (Biological Sciences) 

OFFICE 

Smith Hall 348, 410-704-4920 

Fax:410-704-2604 

www.towson.edu/ess 

THE PROGRAM 

The Environmental Science and Studies Program has two primary 
educational objectives. One is to provide the fundamental scientific, 
technical and social knowledge that program graduates will need to 
assess, plan and evaluate environmental concerns, particularly 
those confronting metropolitan regions. The second is to instill the 
wide range of cognitive skills and content mastery which students 
will need to effectively analyze environmental issues and propose 
realistic plans for solving environmental problems at local, regional 
and national levels. 

The core requirements of the program are structured to meet 
these two objectives and include mathematical and scientific foun- 
dations as well as extensive interdisciplinary study related to envi- 
ronmental issues. The required senior seminar integrates the stu- 
dent's program of study, and the internship/research requirement 
gives first-hand practice in an environmental field. The environ- 
mental problems addressed in many classes and seminars will focus 
on the adjacent urban/suburban region and its impact on the sur- 
rounding environment. 

Most environmental problems resist solutions from any single 
discipline. To counter this dilemma, the program utilizes a rigorous 
interdisciplinary approach. The curriculum draws upon the expertise 
of faculty in the areas of biology, chemistry, geology, mathematics, 
environmental ethics and values, public policy, economics, geogra- 
phy, public health and social change. 



148 



The College of Liberal Arts 



MAJOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

AND STUDIES 

The Environmental Science and Studies Program has two concen- 
trations: Environmental Studies and Environmental Science. There 
is considerable overlap in the core courses between the two con- 
centrations. As students progress though the program, they begin 
to specialize in their area of greatest interest. The senior year brings 
students from both concentrations together for a capstone course 
that emphasizes application of concepts to real-world problems. 
The Environmental Studies Concentration is described below. For 
information about the Environmental Science Concentration, see 
the College of Science and Mathematics. 

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES CONCENTRATION 

After completing 55-57 units in common core requirements, stu- 
dents in the Environmental Studies Concentration complete one of 
four tracks: Environmental Geographical Analysis, Environmental 
Policy/Management, Environmental Health, or Directed 
Environmental Studies. Each track requires 15 additional units. 

All students in the program will complete a common core of course 
work establishing the scientific principles and mathematical skills 
needed as a foundation for more specialized study. They also will 
complete a core of courses in social sciences, a capstone course, and 
an upper-level internship or research course. 

Of the total units in program requirements, a minimum of 23 
may be used to fulfill GenEd requirements (identified by an aster- 
isk following the course number), effectively reducing the number 
of units that apply solely to the Environmental Science and Studies 
major. 

Common Core Requirements (55-57 units) 

Natural Sciences (16 units) 

BIOL 20 1 -' Biology 1: Cellular Biology and Genetics (4) 
BIOL 202° Biology H: Introduction to Ecology, Evolution and 

Behavior (4) 
CHEM 104' Introduction to Environmental Chemistry (4) 
GEOL 121* Physical Geology (41 

Mathematics and Statistics (6-8 units) 

One of the following: 

MATH 119' Pre-calculus (4) 

MATH 211' Calculus for Applications (3) 

One of the following: 

MATH 231 ' Basic Statistics (3) 

MATH 237' Elementary Biostatistics (4) 

GEOG 375 Quantitative Methods in Geography (3) 

ECON 205* Statistics for Business and Economics (3) 

Social Science/Humanities (27 units) 
ECON 201 ' Microcconomic Principles (3) 
ECON 375 Environmental Economics (3) 

or 
ECON 376 Natural Resource Economics (3) 
ENGL 318 Advanced Informational Writing (3) 

or 
GEOG 383 Natural Resources and Society: A Geographical 

Perspective (3) 
GEOG 101' Physical Geography (3) 
(!EOG 410 Environmental Geography (3) 
HLTH 451 Ecological Aspects of Health (3) 
PHIL 255' Environmental Ethics (3) 
pose 103* American National Government (3) 

or 
POSC 207* State and Local Government (3) 
pose 421 Politics and Environmental Policy (3) 

'Courses may be used to fulfill General Education requirements. 



Seminar and Application (6 units) 

ENVS 482 Environmental Research 



ENVS 485 
ENVS 491 



Environmental Internship (3) 
Senior Seminar 



ENVIRONMENTAL GEOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS TRACK 
(15 units) 

Students will complete the following courses and any additional 
3-unit course from the list of courses below. 

GEOG 221 Interpretation of Maps (3) 

GEOG 412 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3) 

GEOG 416 Principles of Remote Sensing and Digital Image 
Processing (3) 

GEOG 481 Environmental Impact Analysis (3) 

ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY/MANAGEMENT TRACK 

(15 units) 

Any five courses from the following: 

ECON 325 Economic Development (3) 

ECON 337 Public Finance (3) 

ECON 351 Urban Economics (3) 

ECON 375 Environmental Economics (3) (if not taken as part of 

core) 
ECON 376 Natural Resource Economics (3) (if not taken as part 

of core) 
ECON 470-479Topics in Economics (3) (with approval of program 

director) 
PHIL 319' Science, Technology and Values (3) 
POSC 470-479 Special Topics in Political Science (3) (with approval of 

program director) 
POSC 488 Seminar: Energy and the Environment (3) 

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH TRACK (15 units) 

Any five courses from the following: 
GEOG 329 Medical Geography (3) 
GEOG 385 Population Geography (3) 

or 
SOCI 329 Demography (3) 

GEOG 41 1 Studies in Natural Hazards (3) 
GEOG 412 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3) 
GEOG 470 Seminar: Selected Topics (3) 
HLTH 435 Epidemiological Aspects of Disease and Environmental 

Health (3) 
POSC 488 Seminar: Public Policy Analysis (3) 

DIRECTED ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES TRACK 

(15 units) 

All students selecting this track should, in consultation with their 
adviser, develop a coherent course of study that includes five elec- 
tives. This list of courses, to be identified late in the sophomore 
year, is submitted to the program director for approval. 

Students complete 15 units of environmental studies electives 
selected from among the electives listed above and those listed 
below. 

Environmental Studies Electives 

GEOG 319 Soils and Vegetation (3) 

GEOG 383 Natural Resources and Society (if not taken as part of 

the core) (3) 

C;E0G 393 Transportation and Infrastructure Planning (3) 

(iEOG 405 Comprehensive Planning (3) 

GEOG 411 Studies in Natural Hazards (3) 

GEOG 414 GIS Application (3) 

GEOG 484 Land Use Planning (3) 

GEOG 495 Directed Readings (3) 

GEOG 496 Independent Research (3) 

HLTH 491 Health Directed Readings (3) 

PHIL 380 Eco-philosophy (3) 

POSC 305 Urban Government (3) 

POSC 375 Public Administration 

PSYC 341 Environmental Psychology (3) 

SOCI 329 Demography (3) 



Department of Family Studies and Human Services 



149 



MINOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 

Students may minor in Environmental Studies by taking five key 
core courses and fulfilling an additional 6-8 unit requirement for 
the minor (21-23 units total). 

All students minoring in Environmental Studies take the follow- 
ing five core courses for a total of 15 units. Some of these courses 
have General Education prerequisites. 

ECON 375 Environmental Economics (3) 

or 
ECON 376 Natural Resource Economics (3) 

GEOG 410 Environmental Geography (3) 

HLTH 45 1 Ecological Aspects of Health (3) 

PHIL 255' Environmental Ethics (3) 

pose 421 Politics and Environmental Policy (3) 

Science majors who minor in Environmental Studies take two 
additional 3-unit elective courses from the list of environmental 
studies electives. Total unit requirement for the minor for science 
majors is 21 units. 

Non-science majors who minor in Environmental Studies take 8 
units in the environmental sciences. A one-year sequence in a sci- 
ence with lab (8 units) selected from the environmental sciences 
(BIOL 201-202, CHEM 110-111, GEOL 121 and GEOL 305) sat- 
isfies this requirement. Total unit requirement for the minor for 
non-science majors is 23 units. 

'Courses may he used to fulfill General Education requirements. 




Department of Family Studies and 
Human Services 

Professors: Karen Goldrich Eskow (Chair and Family Studies 
Program Director), Joan McMahon (Human Resource 
Development), Donna Wagner (Gerontology Program Director) 

Assistant Professors: Jodi Jacobson (Family Studies), Linda 
Oravecz (Family Studies), Shannon Mathews (Gerontology) 

Lecturer: Gina Costa (Family Studies) 

Affiliated Faculty: Patricia Alt (Health Science), Susan Battels 
(School Psychology), Donna Cox (Health Science), Marion 
Hughes (Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice), Wayne 
Nelson (Health Science), Howard Nixon (Sociology, 
Anthropology and Criminal Justice), Michael Seganish 
(Accounting/Business Law), Kim Shiffren (Psychology), Jan 
Sinnott (Psychology), Edyth Wheeler (Early Childhood 
Education) 

OFFICE 

Lmthicum Hall 002 and 016 

Family Studies: 410-704-5851 http://pages.towson.edu/fmst 

Gerontology: 410-704-5154 www.towson.edu/gerontology 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Family Studies and Human Services offers 
undergraduate programs in family studies and gerontology: a 
major in Family Studies with tracks in Family and Human Services, 
Services to Children, and Child Life; a major in Gerontology; a 
minor in Family Studies; and a minor in Gerontology. 

The Family Studies Program provides students with academic and 
clinical experiences related to the study and application of individ- 
ual and family development across the life span with an additional 
emphasis on human service education. Academic preparation 
includes family life methodology, theories of family functioning, 
dynamics within families and interaction between families and the 
larger social context. The curriculum emphasizes civic engagement 
through service learning. Service learning involves a process of 
preparation for community experiences, participation in the com- 
munity and integration of the academic preparation and communi- 
ty participation. The integration process involves self-reflection as 
well as self-discovery, including understanding of values, skills and 
content. Community participation is required in several core cours- 
es throughout the curriculum. 

The Gerontology Program is multidisciplinary and provides students 
with an understanding of the scope of gerontology, the issues that 
are central to the study of aging, and a perspective from which to 
understand the phenomenon of human aging and its implications 
on society. The program is designed to prepare students for entry- 
level occupational positions within the field of aging and to provide 
the knowledge and skills necessary for acceptance by graduate and 
professional schools for additional gerontological education. 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

The department offers a Master of Science in Applied Gerontology, 
a Master of Science in Human Resource Development, a Post- 
baccalaureate Certificate in Applied Gerontology, and a Post- 
baccalaureate Certificate in Family Studies. See the Graduate 
Catalog for details. 



150 



The College of Liberal Arts 



FAMILY STUDIES PROGRAM 

MAJOR IN FAMILY STUDIES 

Majors in Family Studies complete 57-72 units of course work 
depending on the track of study the student selects. Students com- 
plete 39-40 units in the core curriculum. For each track, they com- 
plete additional track-specific courses and electives. Core require- 
ments include a sequence of focused community courses including: 
FMST 201 Preparation; FMST 387 Preparation and Participation; 
FMST 397 Internship-Preparation, Participation and Integration; 
and FMST 490 Integration. The units of internship requirements 
are specified by each track. Students must maintain a 2.00 GPA or 
better in all courses required for the major and must meet Towson 
University requirements for the completion of a Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science degree. 

Prerequisites for Courses in the Major 

The following courses are prerequisites for courses required in the 
major. The 100-level courses should be taken early in the student's 
academic studies, and PSYC 212 must be taken prior to FMST 485. 

ENGL 102 Writing for a Liberal Education (3) (GenEd LA) 

or 
ENGL 190 Honors Writing Seminar (3) (GenEd LA) 
PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) (GenEd II.C.2) 

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) (GenEd II.B.2) 

PSYC 212 Behavioral Statistics (3) (GenEd I.C) 

or equivalent course approved by program director 

Required Core Courses (39-40 units) 

FMST 101 
FMST 201 
FMST 301 
FMST 302 
FMST 303 
FMST 380 
FMST 387 
FMST 485 

FMST 490 
PSYC 203 

OCTH216 
HLTH 220 
EDUC201 
CO.MM 115 



Introduction to Family Studies (3) (GenEd ILB.2) 

Family Resources (3) (GenEd 1I.B.3) 

Family Relationships (3) 

Theories of Family Functioning (3) 

Trends in Contemporary Family Life (3) 

Family Law (3) 

Community Services for Families (3) 

Writing and Research Methods in Family Studies (3) 

(GenEd l.D) 

Senior Seminar (3) 

Human Development (3) 

or 

Life Span Adaptation and Occupations (4)* 

Sexuality in a Diverse Society (3) (GenEd II.C.3) 

The Parenting Process (3) 

Interpersonal Relationships (3) 



"recommended for students completing academic preparation fo 
Life Specialist 



Child 



Family Life Educator Certification 

Completion of the core course work above prepares the student for 
provisional certification as a Family Life Educator (CFLE). A stu- 
dent may become fully certified by completing two years of family 
life work experience following graduation. The CFLE credential is 
administered through the National Council on Family Relations. 

Family and Human Services Track (24 units) 

Required Course (.3 units) 

PSYC 205 Introduction to the Helping Relationship (3) 

Required Electives (12 units) 

Electives shall be selected from the followmg content areas: psy- 
chology, sociology, health science, education, gerontology, and 
women's studies. Students are encouraged to take a course in small- 
group dynamics and gerontology. One elective course (3 units) 
must be at the 300 level or above. Minors in Gerontology, 
Sociology, and Psychology can be completed with minimal or no 
additional course work. Electives must be approved by a Family 
Studies adviser. 



Internships (three required internships for a total of 9 units) 
(360 hours) 

FMST 397 Internship in Family Studies (3) repeated three times 

Services to Children Track (18 units) 
Required Course (3 units) 

ECED 201 Intervention and the Young Child (3) 

Required Electives (12 units) 

Electives shall be selected from the following content areas: educa- 
tion, psychology, sociology, and health science. Three elective 
courses (9 units) must be at the 300 level or above. Electives must 
be approved by a Family Studies adviser. 

Internship (3 units) 
(120 hours) 

FMST 397 Internship in Family Studies (3) 

Child Life Track (33 units) 
Required Courses (15 units) 

ECED 201 Intervention and the Young Child (3) 

OCTH 213 Small Group Dynamics (3) 

or 
PSYC 431 Group Dynamics (3) 

PSYC 205 Introduction to the Helping Relationship (3) 

FMST 340 The Hospitalized Child and Family (3) 
SOCI 367 Sociology of Death, Dying and Bereavement (3) 

Required Child and Adolescent Development Courses (9 units) 

ECED 315 Infant Intervention (3) 

PSYC 403 Infant and Child Development (3) 

PSYC 404 Adolescent Psychology (3) 

Internships (three required internships for a total of 9 units) 

(360 hours) 

FMST 397 Internship in Family Studies (3) repeated 3 times 

The following courses are recommended for students completing academic 

preparation for Child Life Specialist: 

OCTH 216 instead of PSYC 203 (core course for major) 

OCTH 213 although PSYC 431 will be accepted 

Additional courses: OCTH 217 or OCTH 218 Analysis of Occupational 

Performance I or II as an additional elective to meet content areas specified 

by the Child Life Council. 

MINOR IN FAMILY STUDIES (21 units) 

The minor in Family Studies provides an opportunity for students 
who would like to study families along with their major focus of 
study. This program fits nicely for students studying in health pro- 
fessions, liberal arts and education. Knowledge about families and 
working with families has emerged as a critical area of concern for 
health, social service, and education professionals. 

Core Required Courses (15 units) 

FMST 101 Introduction to Family Studies (3) 

FMST 301 Family Relationships (3) 

FMST 302 Theories of Family Functioning (3) 

FMST 303 Trends in Contemporary Family Life (3) 

FMST 490 Capstone Experience (3)* 

*or equivalent course approved by chairperson 

Required Elective (3 units) 

Select one course from the following: 

FMST 380 Family Law (3) 

FMST 387 C;i)mnuinity Services for Families (3) 

FMST 397 Internship in Family Studies (3) 

Additional Elective (3 units) 

Students may choose the following content areas: education, 
health, psychology, sociology, gerontology, women's studies. 
Additional courses may be counted as electives at the discretion of 
the Family Studies program director. 



Department of Family Studies and Human Services 



151 



COMMUNITY EXPERffiNCE 

Civic Engagement/Service Learning 

Internships and service learning are critical components of the 
Family Studies major. A continuum of field experiences offered 
throughout the program provides opportunities for students to 
enhance their understanding of course content, develop profession- 
al skills and apply knowledge in the field. Students obtain their 
first field experience during the course FMST 201 Family 
Resources. This course explores the contemporary at-risk condi- 
tions that impact families and children. Additional field experience 
is obtained during the course FMST 387 Community Services for 
Families. This course focuses on service learning through program 
development. Students participate directly with community organ- 
izations and agencies. Internships are the culminating field experi- 
ence for the Family Studies student. The internship experience 
offers students the opportunity to apply course content, learn new 
skills, and develop professional contacts. 

Family Studies interns may work in a variety of settings depending 
on their interests. Internships may occur in off-campus public and 
private agencies, preschool settings, daycare centers for children or 
adults, child abuse and domestic violence centers and various 
health care facilities. Examples of recent student placements 
include: Johns Hopkins Hospital Child Life Center, Family Crisis 
Center of Baltimore County, Baltimore County Police Counseling 
Team, Baltimore County Department of Social Services, CASA of 
Baltimore County, Carl Gold Law Office, The Child Care Center 
of Catonsville Community College, Christiana Hospital 
Maternal/Child Social Work Team, Daisyfields Adoption 
Foundation, Department of Juvenile Justice, "Linkages to 
Learning" Program of Montgomery County, Greater Baltimore 
Crisis Pregnancy Center, House of Ruth, Ronald McDonald 
House, St. Joseph Medical Center, Sheppard Pratt, Stella Maris, 
The Wellness Community, Sykesville Group Shelter Home, and 
Adoptions Together, Inc. 

TUSCFR 

Towson University Student Council on Family Relations (TUSCFR) 
is affiliated with the National Council on Family Relations 
(NCFR). It was initiated and is maintained by students in the 
Family Studies Program with the guidance of faculty advisers. 

ADVISING 

Advising is an important component of the student experience. 
Family Studies majors meet regularly with department advisers 
who help them plan for the future. Please note the specific infor- 
mation about the advising process listed below. 

1. Family Studies majors must meet individually with an adviser 
at least once a semester. 

2. The chairperson has times set aside each week to meet with 
students. Students are encouraged to sign up for one of these 
meetings to address questions, concerns or simply to check in 
and review progress and plans. Students may sign up for these 
meetings by stopping by or calling the office, 410-704-5851. 

3. All new or potential majors must meet with the chairperson. (See 
#2 above for details). 

4. Special Permits are given out by the chairperson. Students 
must have an advising meeting with the chairperson to receive 
permits for these courses. 



GERONTOLOGY PROGRAM 

MAJOR IN GERONTOLOGY 

Students pursuing a degree in Gerontology must complete a mini- 
mum of 45 units in the program as outlined below and maintain a 
2.00 GPA or better in all required courses. Required elective cours- 
es must be approved by students' Gerontology adviser. 

Required Core Courses (18-21 units) 

GERO 101 Introduction to Gerontology (3) 

PSYC 405 Psychology of Aging (3) 

SOCI 359 Social Gerontology (3) 

GERO 485 Gerontology Senior Seminar (3) 

HLTH 411 Health and Later Maturity (3) 

or 

BIOL 313 Biology of Aging (3) 

GERO 397 Internship Arranged with Gerontology Adviser (3-6) 

Required Methods Courses (6-8 units) 

Research Methods (approved by Gerontology adviser) (3-4) 

Social or Behavioral Statistics (approved by Gerontology adviser) (3-4) 

Elective Upper-Level Courses (12 units) 

GERO 310 Social Issues in Human Life Span Technology (3) 

GERO 330 Community Planning for Aging Society (3) 

GERO 450 Directed Readings in Gerontologv (3) 

BULA 470 Elder Law (3) 

GEOG 407 Geography of the Aged (3) 

SOCI 377 Gender and Aging (3) 

KNES 455 Activity Programming for the Older Adult (3) 

SOCI 329 Demography (3) 

SOCI 367 Sociology of Death, Dying and Bereavement (3) 

or other upper-level courses approved by Gerontology 

adviser 

Cognate Electives (9 units) 

ANTH 207 Cultural Anthropology (3) 

ANTH 209 Anthropology of American Culture (3) 

ANTH 211 Honors Anthropology of American Culture (3) 

ECON 339 Health Economics (3) 

HLTH 101 Current Health Problems (3) 

HLTH 204 Nutrition and Weight Control for the Consumer (3) 

HLTH 207 Health Care m the U.S. (3) 

HLTH 208 Mental Health, Stress Management, and Crisis 

Intervention (3) 
HLTH 305 Community Health Administration (3) 
OCTH 103 Leisure and Health (3) 
OCTH 216 Bio-psycho-social Development (3) 
KNES 107 Cardiovascular Fitness (3) 
KNES 204 Nutrition/Weight Control (3) 

PSYC 203 Human Development (3) 

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) 

SOCI 301 The Family (3) 

SOCI 331 Organizations (3) 

SOCI 335 Medical Sociology (3) 

SOCI 357 Social Welfare (3) 

(Additional courses may be counted as Gerontology cognate electives at the 
discretion of the Gerontology program director.) 



I 



TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

Students may transfer no more than 18 credits toward the major in 
Family Studies. Transfer credits must be approved by the depart- 
ment. 



152 



The College of Liberal Arts 



MINOR IN GERONTOLOGY 

Students minoring in Gerontology must complete a minimum of 18 
units of approved course work. When possible, it is recommended 
that a student take a gerontology course within his or her own 
major field of study. Students are required to take three courses (9 
units) from the Gerontology core courses listing below; 
GERO 101 Introduction to Gerontology (3) 

or 
SOCI 359 Social Gerontology (3) 

HLTH 41 1 Health and Later Maturity (3) 

or 
BIOL 3 1 3 Biology of Aging (3) 

PS YC 405 Psychology of Aging (3 ) 

GERO 485 Gerontology Senior Seminar (3) 
GERO 397 Internship (3) 

The remaining 9 units can he fulfilled by other core or elective offerings in 
consultation with the academic adviser. 



Department of Geography and 
Environmental Planning 

Professors: James Dilisio, Wayne McKim, John Morgan, Ralph 

Scott 
Associate Professors: Kent Barnes {Chair), Virginia Thompson 
Assistant Professors: Douglas Herman, Martin Roberge, Charles 

Schmitz, Marshall Stevenson 
Part-time Faculty: Doug Adams, Philip Cantet, Kama Couch, 

Robert Cullison, Charles Goodman, Henry Schupple, Betty 

Shimshak 

OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 20, 410-704-2973 



TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

Students may transfer no more than 18 credits toward the major in 
Gerontology. Transfer credits must be approved by the department. 




PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Geography and Environmental Planning offers 
the following programs: the major in Geography and 
Environmental Planning, the major in Geography and Land 
Surveying, the minor in Geography, the minor in Geographic 
Information Sciences, and the Master of Arts in Geography and 
Environmental Planning, and participates in the Master of 
Education with an emphasis in Geogtaphy. For more information 
about the graduate programs, consult the Graduate Catalog. 

The Geography and Environmental Planning major is designed 
as a liberal arts program that explores how geographers carefully 
observe and measure human uses of the earth undet diverse com- 
binations of natural and cultural environments. Such academic 
preparation facilitates understanding of the changing world and its 
past. 

Students are prepared in the program for careers in business, 
management, governmental service, education, planning, public 
affairs and other professions, as well as graduate school. 

The major in Geography and Land Surveying is designed to meet 
the requirements of professionals in the field of land surveying. 
Courses taken in geography at Towson University will both 
complement those taken in surveying at the Community College of 
Baltimore County-Catonsville as well as provide additional skills of 
value to the professional surveyor. Completion of the four-year 
degree will shorten the time necessary to achieve professional licensure. 

DOUBLE MAJORS 

The department has established coopetative programs with the 
depattments of Economics, Political Science, and Sociology, 
Anthropology and Criminal Justice, which make it possible for stu- 
dents to attain majors in both Geography and one of these other 
disciplines. For further information, contact the Department of 
Geography and Environmental Planning or one of the cooperating 
depattments listed above. 

MAJOR IN GEOGRAPHY AND 
ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING 

Geography majors must complete a minimum of 39 units in geog- 
raphy courses with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. Of these 
39 units, 18 units of core courses are required plus 6 units of pre- 
scribed group courses. The remaining 1.5 units in the majot are 
selected from 200-400 level geography electives reflecting the stu- 
dent's areas of interest. A maximum of 6 units of these electives 
mav be taken at the 200 level. 



Department of Geography and Environmental Planning 



153 



Core Requirements (18 units) 

GEOG 101 Physical Geography (3) 

GEOG 109 Human Geography (3) or CiEOG 102 (3) or 105 (3) or 1 10 (3) 

GEOG 221 Interpretation of Maps (3) 

GEOG 223 Physical Geography Applications (3) 

GEOG 375 Quantitative Methods in Geography (3) 

GEOG 401 Growth of Geographic Thought (3) 

Group Requirements (6 units) 

Majors must select at least one techniques course and at least one 
regional course. These courses may be selected from the following: 

Technical Courses 

Select at least one: 

GEOG 321 Interpretation of Aerial Photographs (3) 

GEOG 323 Cartography and Graphics 1(3) 

GEOG 412 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3) 

GEOG 416 Principles of Remote Sensing and Digital Image 

Processing (3) 
GEOG 418 Computer Mapping (3) 

Regional Courses 

Select at least one: 

GEOG 420 Geography of Anglo America (3) 

GEOG 423 Geography of Maryland (3) 

GEOG 43 1 Geography of Africa ( 3 ) 

GEOG 424 Historical Geography of Atlantic Canada (3) 

GEOG 443 Geography of East Asia (3) 

GEOG 445 Geography of South and Southeast Asia (3) 

GEOG 447 Geography of the Middle East (3) 

GEOG 448 Conflict in Ireland (3) 

GEOG 451 Geography of Europe (3) 

GEOG 453 Geography of the former U.S.S.R. (3) 

GEOG 461 Geography of Latin America (3) 

Electives (15 units) 

Majors must take 15 units of geography electives at the 200-400 

level. A maximum of 6 units may be taken at the 200 level. 

MAJOR IN GEOGRAPHY AND LAND SURVEYING 

The major in Geography and Land Surveying is based on a trans- 
fer articulation agreement between the Community College of 
Baltimore County-Catonsville and Towson University. Most stu- 
dents electing to major in Geography and Land Surveying will com- 
plete the A.A.S. degree in Land Surveying at CCBC-Catonsville 
prior to enrollment at Towson University. All surveying courses 
will transfer. However, Towson University will only accept a max- 
imum of 64 total credits in transfer. Any GenEd requirements not 
completed prior to enrollment will be completed at Towson 
Universit)-. Current Towson Geography majors interested in this 
program should see the department chair. 

The program of study follows the guidelines for a major in 
Geography and Environmental Planning. A total of 39 units are 
required as indicated above. A total of 6 units can be met bv trans- 
fer to satisfy the GEOG 101, GEOG 102, GEOG 105, and GEOG 
109/1 10 requirements. The techniques requirement must he met by 
completing one of the following courses: GEOG 321, GEOG 412, 
GEOG 416, or GEOG 418. The preferred course for fulfilling the 
regional requirement is GEOG 423 The Geography of Maryland. 
Elective units (a minimum of 15) should be selected in consultation 
with the adviser, as some are more preferable than others. GEOG 
491 Internship is strongly recommended for those with little or no 
work experience. Students may not substitute past work experi- 
ence, nor use concurrent work to meet internship requirements, 
without permission of the department. A non-major requirement 
for this program is calculus, which may be taken at Catonsville or 
Towson, and which must be passed with a grade of C or higher. 



For further information on this program, contact James E. 
Lobdell, coordinator of the Surveying Program at CCBC- 
Catonsville (410-455-4965), or the chair of the Department of 
Geography and Environmental Planning at Towson University 

(410-704-2973). 

DOUBLE MAJOR IN GEOGRAPHY AND 
SOCIOLOGY-ANTHROPOLOGY 

The departments of Geography and Environmental Planning and 
Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice offer a program 
leading to a bachelor's degree with a double major in Geography 
and Environmental Planning and Sociology-Anthropology, with a 
concentration in Sociology or Anthropology. The Sociology 
Concentration course requirements are listed below. For informa- 
tion on the Anthropology Concentration double major option, see 
the department chair in Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal 
Justice. 

I. The following lower-division courses must be taken: 

A. GEOG 101 Physical Geography (3) 

B. SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) 

(Both A and B count toward General Education 
requirements.) 

n. One of the following statistics courses must be taken: 

A. GEOG 375 Quantitative Methods in Geography (3) 

or 

B. PSYC 212 Behavioral Statistics (4) 

or 

C. MATH 231 Basic Statistics I (3) 

(Any of these courses will count as 3 units in either 
Geography or Sociology and satisfy the statistics 
requirement in both programs. Students cannot receive 
unit in both the first and second major for more than 
one of these courses.) 

III. Two of the following sociology courses must be taken: 

SOCI 313 Introduction to Social Psychology (3) 

SOCI 320 Military Sociology (3) 

SOCI 323 Social Change (3) 

SOCI 327 Urban Sociology (3) 

SOCI 329 Demography (3) 

SOCI 331 Deviance and Organizations (3) 

St^CI 333 Political Sociology (3) 

SOCI 335 Medical Sociology (3) 

SOCI 341 Class, Status and Power (3) 

SOCI 359 Social Gerontology (3) 

SOCI 470-479 Special Topics in Sociology (3) (Topics offered here 

may be accepted with approval of the Department of 
Geography and Environmental Planning adviser.) 



of the following geography courses must be taken: 

329 Medical Geography (3) 

Urban Design (3) 

Historical Geography of Urbanization (3) 

Cultural Geography (3) 

Political Geography (3) 

Natural Resources and Society (second writing course) 

(3) 

Population Geography (3) 

Urban Systems (3) 

Comprehensive Planning (3) 

Geography of the Aged (3) 
470-479Seminar: Selected Topics in Geography (3) (Topics 

offered here may be accepted with approval of the 

Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal 

Justice adviser.) 
GEOG 494 Travel Study (3) 
GEOG 495 Directed Reading in Geography (with approval of 

Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal 

Justice adviser) (3) 
GEOG 496 Independent Study in Geography (with approval of the 

Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal 

Justice adviser) (3) 



rv. Two 

GEOG 
GEOG 
GEOG 
GEOG 
GEOG 
GEOG 

GEOG 
GEOG 
GEOG 
GEOG 
GEOG 



351 
355 
357 
381 
383 

385 
391 
405 
407 



154 



The College of Liberal Arts 



V. The following courses are required to complete the Geography 
major portion of the double major: 
A. Core Courses 

World Regional Geography (3) 



GEOG 102 

GEOG 105 

GEOG 109 
GEOG 221 
GEOG 223 
GEOG 401 



Geography of International Affairs (3) 

or 

Human Geography (3) 

Interpretation of Maps (3) 

Physical Geography Applications (3) 

Growth of Geographic Thought (3) 



B. Techniques Course (only one of the following) 
GEOG 321 Interpretation of Aerial Photographs (3) 
GEOG 323 Cartography and Graphics I (3) 
GEOG 47x Computer Mapping (3) 

GEOG 412 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3) 
GEOG 416 Principles of Remote Sensing and Digital Image 
Processing (3) 

C. Regional Geography Course (one 400-level regional course) 

D. Elective Geography Course (one upper-level course) 

VI. The following courses are required to complete the Sociology 
Concentration in the double major: 

A. Core Courses 

SOCI38I Sociological Theorv (3) 

SOCI 391 Research Methods (3) 

B. Electives 

Students must complete 18 units of electives in sociology, at least 
12 of which must be upper division. Two elective coures (6 units) 
may be in anthropology. 

DOUBLE MAJOR IN GEOGRAPHY AND 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

See Department of Political Science for details. 

DOUBLE MAJOR IN ECONOMICS AND GEOGRAPHY 
AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING 

Completion of individual majors in Geography and Environmental 
Planning and Economics requires the successful completion of 72 
units (39 in geography and environmental planning and 33 in eco- 
nomics). However, by electing the double major in Geography and 
Environmental Planning and Economics, students will be able to 
complete both majors with a total of 60 units. 

I. In economics, students must complete all requirements for the 
major. 

II. One of the following statistics courses must be taken: 
ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics (3) 

or 
GEOG 375 Quantitative Methods in Geography (3) 

III. Students may substitute two of the following courses in geog- 
raphy and environmental planning toward fulfillment of the 
required 12 units of upper-level economics electives: 

GEOG 355 Historical (icography of Urbanization (3) 

GEOG 381 Political Geography (3) 

GEOG 385 Population Geography (3) 

GEOG 391 Urban Systems (3) 

GEOG 393 Transportation and Infrastructure Planning (3) 

GEOG 405 Comprehensive Planning 

GEOG 427 The Global Economy (3) 

GEOG 470-479 Seminar: Selected Topics in Geography* (3) 

GEOG 481 Environmental Impact Analysis (3) 

GEOG 484 Land Use Planning (3) 



IV. In geography and environmental planning, students must com- 
plete all requirements for the major. In addition, they may substi- 
tute two of the following upper-level courses in economics toward 
fulfillment of the required upper-level elective courses in geogra- 
phy and environmental planning: 

ECON 323 Comparatiye Economic Systems (3) 

ECON 325 Economic Development (3) 

ECON 333 Poverty and Discrimination (3) 

ECON 351 Urban Economics (3) 

ECON 421 International Economics (3) 

ECON 423 International Monetary Theory and Policy (3) 

ECON 470-479 Topics in Economics* (3) 
■■'Approval from Department of Geography and Environmental Planning 
depending on course topic. 

For further information on this program contact the chairperson of 
the Department of Economics, or Dr. James DiLisio of the 
Department of Geography and Environmental Planning. 

MLNOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

Students minoring in Geography must complete a minimum of 21 
units. Six units will be at the 100 level (physical geography and 
either GEOG 102, 105, or 109/110) with the remainder at the 200- 
400 level, including one techniques intensive course. A maximum 
of 6 units may be taken at the 200 level and all course selections 
must be made in consultation with a faculty adviser. A grade equiv- 
alent of 2.00 or higher is required in all courses in the minor. 

MLNOR IN GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCES 

Geographic Information Sciences (GISciences) is an integrative, 
skills-based discipline that facilitates observation and analysis at 
global scales, employing a spatial perspective that is useful to many 
disciplines. The minor in GISciences provides students with basic 
professional skills for conducting spatial analysis, combining con- 
ceptual frameworks with technical proficiencies in tools such as 
geographic information systems, remote sensing, global positioning 
systems, cartography, and spatial statistics. 

The minor works well with a variety of majors from the College 
of Business and Economics, the College of Health Professions, the 
College of Liberal Arts, and the College of Science and 
Mathematics. GISciences is a growing field and Towson University 
is recognized as a GISciences leader in Maryland. Students gradu- 
ating with GISciences skills are in demand by employers, due to the 
large number of academic, private, government, and nonprofit 
organizations that are creating or expanding their GIS capabilities. 

The minor is awarded upon completion of a minimum of 21 
units of required and elective courses. A maximum of 6 units from 
other departments may be counted toward the minor, with the 
approval of the program director. Students are strongly encouraged 
to complete a GIS internship with a government agency or business. 

Required Courses (12 units) 

GEOG 221 Interpretation of Maps (3) 

or 
GEOG 230* Understanding and Communicating through Maps (3) 
GEOG 323 Cartography and Graphics 1 (3) 

or 
GEOG 418 ("omputer Mapping (3) 
GEOG 375 Quantitative Methods in Geography (3) or approved 

statistics course 
CiEOG 412 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3) 

Electives (9 units) 

GEOG 321 Interpretation of Aerial Photographs (3) 

GEOG 414 GIS Applications (Spatial Analysis and Geographic 

Information Systems) (3) 
GEOG 416 Remote Sensing and Digital Image Processing (3) 
GEOG 470-9 Seminar: Selected Topics (in GIS) (3) 



* Approval from Department of Economics depending on course topic. 



Department of Geography and Environmental Planning 



155 



GEOG 491 Internship (1-6; 3 maximum toward mmor) 
GEOG 495 Directed Readings in Geography (GIS topics) (3) 
GEOG 496 Independent Study in Geography (GIS topics) (3) 

'Courses may be used to fulfill General Education requirements. 

Other lower- and upper-division computer science courses, as well 
as GIS applications courses offered by other departments may be 
considered as electives, with the approval of the department chair. 

GEOGRAPHY SECONDARY EDUCATION 
PROGRAM 

Required in major (39 units): lower-division (100-200) courses 
(12-18); upper-division (300-400) courses (21-27), at least 12 units 
of which must be courses designated as systematic or technique 
courses. 

Required in related subjects {33 units): history courses: HIST 
145, HIST 146, HIST 101, plus 6 units of history electives; politi- 
cal science: POSC 103: sociology: SOCI 101; economics: ECON 
201 and ECON 202; anthropology: either ANTH 207, ANTH 
208, or ANTH 209; and a specified topics in social science course. 

Note: The standards for students enrolled in Teacher Education 
Programs require a GPA of 2.75 in academic majors prior to stu- 
dent teaching. Please be aware that this GPA is higher than that 
required by the department for its majors. Students must contact 
the Department of Secondary Education about admission to the 
Secondary Teacher Education Program. 

TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

Geography and Environmental Planning majors may transfer up to 
12 credits toward a major, and Geography minors may transfer up 
to 6 credits. All transfer credits require department approval. 

INTERNSHIPS 

Majors have the opportunity to participate in the university's 
Internship/Cooperative Education Program. This valuable adjunct 
to the educational program provides qualifying students with both 
academic unit and work experience with participating government 
agencies (federal, state and local) and private businesses. The 
internship offers the student a way of trying out a potential career 
choice prior to actual entry into the job market. Because the bene- 
fits of this experience are so positive, majors are strongly urged to 
participate in this program. 



SPECIAL DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS 

The department sponsors the Beta Delta Chapter of Gamma Theta 
Upsilon, an international geography honorary society. GTU holds 
lectures and presents films and speakers on topics in geography and 
environmental planning. All Geography majors are welcome to 
join. 

Travel studies are available during the summer within the United 
States and to foreign locations. 

The National Council for Geographic Education awards are 
given to academically outstanding graduating majors. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS IN GEOGRAPHY 

The department offers an honors program in geography. To be 
admitted, students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.25, and a 3.50 
in the major, or consent of their faculty adviser. Students may be 
admitted to the program no sooner than the spring of their sopho- 
more year. 

The honors program requires a minimum of 39 units, including 
6 to 9 units in seminars, directed readings and research pro|ects. 
A senior thesis and oral defense are also required. Students should 
consult their faculty adviser for more information. 

CAREERS IN GEOGRAPHY AND 
ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING 

Faculty of the department are active in career advising. 
Occasional careers days are held, and the department participates 
in a regional network of career advising in geography. Graduates 
of the department are currently employed in a wide array of jobs 
such as teachers, professors, meteorologists, intelligence analysts 
with the Department of Defense, cartographers, planners, statis- 
ticians, travel agents, and environmental engineers. 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 

The Master of Arts degree program in Geography and 
Environmental Planning is designed to prepare students for doctor- 
al programs as well as for career opportunities in private business 
and public agencies. The program is oriented toward applied geog- 
raphy and presents possibilities for an emphasis in the following 
areas: urban and regional planning, urban studies, public policy 
issues, physical geography, environmental assessment, energy 
resources, cultural and historical geography, medical geography, 
population, area studies, cartography and geographic information 
systems. 

Graduate students in Geography and Environmental Planning 
are encouraged to take pertinent course work in other departments. 
Students may pursue either the thesis program (30 units and a 
6-unit thesis) or the non-thesis program (36 units). Detailed infor- 
mation is given in the Graduate Catalog. 



156 



The College of Liberal Arts 



Department of History 

Professors: Dean Esslinger, Cindy Gissendanner, Karl Larew, 

Ronn Pineo, Patricia Romero, Robert Rook (Chair), Mark 

Whitman 
Associate Professors: Nicole Dombrowski, Steven Phillips 
Assistant Professors: Omar Ali, Laura Eldridge, Elizabeth Kelly 

Gray, Kimberly Katz, Wendy Lower, Akim Reinhardt, Allaire 

Stallsmith 
Part-time Faculty: Patricia Anderson. Timothy Hanson, 

Michael Johnson, Tina Sheller, Jakub Zejmis 
Lecturer: John Mancini 
Emeritus: Herbert Andrews, Arnold Blumberg, Edwin 

Hirschmann, Jenny Jochens, Harry Piotrowski, Wayne 

McWilliams, Armin Mruck, Fred Rivers, Roderick Ryon, 

Myron Scholnick, John Van Osdell 



OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 119F, 410- 
www.towson.edu/history/ 



W-2923 



PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of History offers the following programs: the 
major in History; the History Secondary Education major, for stu- 
dents planning to teach history at the secondary level; and the 
minor in History. Each of these programs encourages students to 
explore the study of history in depth. Such investigation leads to 
an appreciation of the structure and function of the discipline and 
prepares the student for teaching, for graduate work and for the 
study of law, theology, archival management, library science, his- 
torical preservation and museology. 

Skills, as well as historical knowledge acquired through the 
study of the discipline, may also lead to career opportunities in 
public history, federal, state and local government, and in business 
and industry. Students may opt for more career flexibility by 
choosing double majors or by combining History with a minor: 
History and .\rt. History and English, History and Women's 
Studies, History and Business, History and Communication, for 
example. 

History majors and minors are also expected to take correlative 
courses that broaden their academic backgrounds and offer valu- 
able insights into their subjects. The department also strongly rec- 
ommends the completion of the intermediate level of a foreign lan- 
guage. The department offers courses in the fields of American, 
European, Asian, African and Latin American history. The offer- 
ings are varied. Some courses are chronological, topical or nation- 
al in scope. Others are in women's, ethnic, business, social, cultur- 
al or political history. 

All courses offered encourage an appreciation of the historical 
past through lecture/discussion, reading, analysis and writing. 
Because history explores all aspects of human endeavor, history 
courses touch upon the insights of all disciplines from the histori- 
cal perspective. 

An internship is a practical application of historical knowledge 
and skill. An internship may be taken at institutions such as the 
Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore City Archives, Baltimore 
Museum of Industry, Jewish Museuin of Maryland, Inc. or Towson 
University Archives. 

The department participates in interdisciplinary programs such 
as International Studies, Social Sciences, Women's Studies, the 
minors in African and .African American Studies, Jewish Studies, 
Classical Studies, and Lesbian and Gay Studies, and in 
Interdisciplinary Studies, tracks in American Studies, African- 
American Studies, Comparative Ethnic Studies, Latin American 
Studies, Asian Studies, and Medieval and Renaissance Studies. 



MAJOR IN HISTORY 

In addition to the General Education (GenEd) requirements, 
History majors are required to complete 39 units with a grade 
equivalent of 2.00 or higher. The Bachelor of Arts degree may be 
earned by adding a foreign language to the major course require- 
ments. The language requirement can be met by completing the 
intermediate courses (or their equivalent) of a modern foreign 
language. 

Required Courses (18 units) 

HIST 101 Introduction to Ancient Civilization (3) 

HIST 102 History of European Civilizanon through the I7th 

Century (3) 
HIST 103 Histor)' of European Civilization from the 17th Centur\- (3) 

or 
HIST 108 Honors Histor}' of European Civilization from the 17th 

Century (3) 
HIST 145 History of the United States to the Mid-1 9th Century (3) 

HIST 146 History of the United States since the .\!id-19th Centur)' (3) 

or 
HIST 148 Honors History of the United States since the Mid-19th 

Century (3) 
HIST 300 Introduction to Historical Study (3) 

Electives (21 units) 

Students must complete 21 units of electives offered by the depart- 
ment, at least 15 of which must be in upper-division courses. 
Within the 21 units of electives, there must be at least one 3-unit 
upper-division course each in American and European history. 
Nine units must be taken in Asian, .\frican, Latin American or 
world history. No more than two upper-division courses may be 
taken with the same instructor (seminar, HIST 300, directed read- 
ing, directed research, colloquium and travel study are excepted). 

MINOR IN HISTORY 

History minors are required to complete 24 units with a grade 
equivalent of 2.00 or higher in each course taken from among the 
following courses. 

Required Courses (6 units) 

HIST 300 Introduction to Historical Study (3) 

One of the folloiving: 

HIST 107 Introduction to History of Islamic Civilization (3) 

HIST 109 Introduction to the Civilization of India (3) 

HIST 110 East Asian Civilization to the 17th Century (3) 

HIST 111 .Vlodern East Asia since the 17th Century (3) 

HIST 121 Latin America: Colonial Period (3) 

HIST 122 Latin .America: National Period (3) 

HIST 135 African History and Culture (3) 

Lower-Division History Electives (9 units) 

Upper-Division History Electives (9 units) 

(Excluding HIST 300 Introduction to Historical Study) 

No more than two upper-division courses may be taken with the 

same instructor. (HIST 300 is excepted.) Seminar, directed reading, 

directed research, colloquium and travel study may not be taken 

for History minor requirements. 

HISTORY SECONDARY EDUCATION PROGRAM 

History majors may wish to obtain certification to teach history at 
the secondary level. Students in this Secondary Education Program 
receive certification to teach in Maryland upon graduation. See 
Department of Secondary Education requirements. Students must 
contact the Department of Secondary Education about admission 
to the Secondary Teacher Education Program. 

In addition to the GenEd requirements, and the requirements 
specified by the Department of Secondary Education, students must 



Department of History 



157 



complete 54 units with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher in each 
course taken from among the courses listed below. Of the 54 units, 
21 must be completed in the required history courses, and 24 m 
social sciences courses and 9 units in history electives before stu- 
dent teaching. 

Required History Courses (21 units) 

HIST 102 History of European Civilization through the 17th 

Century (3) 
HIST 103 Histor)' of European Civilization from the 17th Century (3) 

or 
HIST 108 Honors History of European Civilization from the 17th 

Century (3) 
HIST 145 History of the United States to the Mid-19th Century (3) 

HIST 146 History of the United States since the Mid-1 9th Century (3) 

or 
HIST 148 Honors History of the United States since the Mid-19th 

Century (3) 
HIST 300 Introduction to Historical Study (3) 

Two of the following: 

African History Course (3) 

Asian History Course (3) 

Latin American History Course (3) 

World History Course (3) 

History Electives (9 units) 

Students must complete 9 units of electives offered by the depart- 
ment, at least 6 of which must be in courses at the 300-400 level. 
Six units must be in lecture-type format. 

Required Social Sciences Courses (24 units) 
ECON 201 Microeconomic Principles (3) 
ECON 202 Macroeconomic Principles (3) 
SOSC 401 Topics in Social Science (3) 

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) 

pose 103 American National Government (3) 

One of the following: 

GEOG 1 1 Phvsical Geography ( 3 ) 

GEOG 102 World Regional Geography (3) 

GEOG 105 Geography of International Affairs (3) 

GEOG 109 Introduction to Human Geography (3) 

One of the following: 

pose 101 Introduction to Political Science (3) 

pose 107 Introduction to International Relations (3) 

POSC 137 Governments of the World (3) 

POSC 207 State Government (3) 

One of the following: 

ANTH 207 Cultural Anthropology (3) 

ANTH 209 American Culture (3) 

SPECIAL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR MAJORS 
AND MINORS 

Students must declare their majors and minors in the department. 
The major or minor should be declared during the second term of 
the freshman year or at the beginning of the sophomore year. 
Students will be given major/minor forms listing additional rules 
for a History major/minor. They will also be required to select an 
academic adviset who will help in preparing a program of courses. 
Students should consult their advisers regularly. Students also must 
update their records each term. A History minor who wishes to stu- 
dent teach must have completed 15 units of the required courses in 
history. 



TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

No more than 18 credits in history will be accepted toward a major 
or a minor from a regionally accredited four-year college. No more 
than 12 lower-division credits in history will be accepted toward a 
major or a minor from a regionally accredited two-year college. 
The 12 credits must be in lower-division courses which have 
Towson University equivalents at the 100-200 level. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT AND CREDIT FOR PRIOR 
LEARNING 

The department awards units through the Advanced Placement 
Program of the university. The department also offers units for 
lower-division courses, and for upper-division courses upon appeal, 
through the Credit for Prior Learning Program. Students applying 
for credit under this program complete a departmental examina- 
tion, an interview and a paper or book review in the field. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS AND ACTrVTTIES 

The department offers an honors program in history. Eligibility 
requirements and rules governing the departmental honors pro- 
grams are described elsewhere in this catalog. Students interested in 
the history honors program should consult their adviser and their 
department chair no later than the first term of their junior year. 

The department sponsors the Theta Beta Chapter of the nation- 
al history honor society. Phi Alpha Theta. The society presents lec- 
tures, films and other programs. Students may inquire about mem- 
bership requirements at the department office. 

The department awards at graduation each year the Medal of the 
Daughters of American Colonists, presented by the Cecilius Calvert 
Chapter of that organization, and the Disabled American Veterans 
Prize in History. 

The Mary Catherine Kahl Prize is awarded annually to a History 
major or minor of outstanding promise who has not yet graduated. 
An essay in history written by the nominees is submitted as an inte- 
gral part of the prize competition. 

The Arnold Blumberg Prize is awarded annually to the senior 
History major who has compiled the most outstanding record in 
the field of European History. 

The Douglas D. Martin Sr. History Award provides scholarship 
support for undergraduate History majors with a minimum of 85 
units who have demonstrated an interest in the study of Western 
U.S. history or native peoples. 

Each year, under an endowment established to honor Professor 
Herbert Duane Andrews, an outstanding scholar will be invited to 
lecture at the university. The lecture will emphasize scholarly 
research which demonstrates the integration of history with other 
disciplines or which utilizes newer methodologies to enhance 
understanding of traditional areas of specialization. 

The department also offers travel-study courses that in the past 
have introduced students to China, Japan, Mexico and several 
European countries. 



158 



The College of Liberal Arts 



Interdisciplinary Studies Program 



Director: Colleen Ebacher 



OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 



108,410-704-2128 



THE PROGRAM 

The Interdisciplinary Studies Program provides students with the 
opportunity to pursue a course of study unavailable through any 
single discipline at Towson University. The program offers students 
three alternatives: (1) the individually designed thematic option; (2) 
four formally designed major tracks and a pre-law program; and 
(3) 10 minors/tracks. 

A major in Interdisciplinary Studies requires a minimum of 45 
upper-division units (300-400 level) though the program director 
may approve substitutions of particularly significant lower-division 
courses. All 45 units must be completed with a grade equivalent of 
2.00 or higher. Students pursuing a minor in Interdisciplinary 
Studies must likewise complete the requisite units with a grade 
equivalent of 2.00 or higher. 

Interdisciplinary Studies majors may transfer up to 21 credits 
toward completion of the major. Interdisciplinary Studies minors 
may transfer up to 9 credits toward completion of the minor. 

INDIVIDUALLY DESIGNED THEMATIC OPTION 

The individually designed thematic option allows students to pur- 
sue a major that is not available at Towson University but that is 
offered at other colleges or universities. Because it is individually 
designed, this option places special responsibilities on the student. 

First, the student must find the model for the major he or she 
wishes to pursue in the catalog of another university and determine 
that Towson University offers the courses necessary to complete the 
major. Second, the student must meet with the director of the 
Interdisciplinary Studies Program to ask for preliminary approval 
of the proposed major. Third, with the assistance of the program 
director, the student must identify a professor with the necessary 
expertise who is willing to serve as his or her major adviser. Fourth, 
under the guidance of the major adviser, the student must write a 
program of study that includes a name for the individually designed 
thematic option, a description of its goals, and a list of required and 
elective courses. After formal approval by the faculty adviser, the 
student, and the director of the Interdisciplinary Studies Program, 
this agreement will constitute the requirements of the student's 
major. 

Students interested in the individually designed thematic option 
should declare their major as soon as possible, ideally no later than 
the first term of the junior year. Regardless of when the major is 
declared, students must enroll in a minimum of 21 units in the 
major following formal approval of the program of study. No 
unapproved program of study may be used for graduation. 

Requirements 

1. A formally approved program of study consisting of a minimum 
of 45 units in the major. 

2. At least 21 of these units must be taken after formal approval of 
the program of study. 

3. The required 45 units must incorporate courses from at least 
three departments or programs. 

4. All course work must be upper-division unless the faculty advis- 
er and the Interdisciplinary Studies Program director approve 
the inclusion of some particularly significant course work at the 
lower-division level. For example, a course important to the 
thematic option may exist only at the lower division. 



FORMALLY DESIGNED MAJOR TRACKS 

There are at present five formally designed major tracks and a pre- 
law program, each designed by an interdisciplinary faculty com- 
mittee. Students interested in any of these programs should contact 
the coordinator of the track. 

Major Tracks 

American Studies 
Animal Behavior 
Asian Studies 
Latin American Studies 

Pre-professional Preparation: 

Pre-law 

MINORS 

Interdisciplinary minors offer an excellent complement to majors in 
traditional disciplines. Students in any major may elect to pursue 
one of these minors. 

Minors/Tracks 

African and African American Studies Minor 

American Studies 

Asian Studies 

Business, Communication and the Liberal Arts Minor 

Classical Studies Minor 

Comparative Ethnic Studies Minor 

Irish Studies Minor 

Jewish Studies Minor 

Latin American Studies 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Minor 

The specific requirements for each of the formally designed major 
tracks and minors are described below. 

AFRICAN AND AFRICAN AMERICAN 
STUDIES MINOR 

Advisory Committee: Lena Ampadu (English, Coordinator), 
Omar Ali (History), Elizabeth Clifford (Sociology, 
Anthropology and Criminal Justice), Matthew Durington 
(Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice}, John 
Gissendanner (English), Wayne McKim (Geography and 
Environmental Planning), John Murungi (Philosophy and 
Religious Studies), Jo-Ann Pilardi (Philosophy and Religious 
Studies), Katia Sainson (Modern Languages), Evangeline 
Wheeler (Psychology), Donn Worgs (Political Science) 



OFFICE 

Lmthicum301B, 410- 



'04-5211 



The Program 

The African and African American Studies minor offers the student 
the opportunity to study in-depth the historical and social experi- 
ences and cultural contributions of Africans and peoples of African 
descent in a global perspective. It also provides a critical perspec- 
tive on race in American society. .An interdisciplinary program con- 
centrating mainly in the humanities, the curriculum of the African 
and African American Studies minor offers students the opportunity 
to customize their course work by exploring a range of subjects in 
various disciplines. Students must complete 21 units for the minor. 



Interdisciplinary Studies Program 



159 



Requirements tor the Minor 

The minor in African and African American Studies requires 21 
units. To fulfill the requirements for the minor in African and 
African American Studies, students must take one required course. 
Students should choose the remaining 18 units from a list of elec- 
tive courses approved by the advisory committee. 

Required Core Course (3 units) 

AFST 201 .Main Themes in African American Studies (3) 

Electives (18 units) 

Students should take courses in at least three different disciplines; 

12 units must be in upper-level courses. 

ENGL 233 Survey of African-American Literature (3) 

or 
ENGL 234 Major Writers in African-American Literature (3) 
ENGL 347 World Literature Written in English: African Women 

Writers (3) 
EN'GL 477 Topics in Black-American Literature (content varies) (3) 
PHIL 251 African-American Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 204 Race, Class and Gender (3) ' 

PHIL 270 Topics: Philosophical Perspectives (3) 

GEOG431 The Geography of Africa (3) 
.^RTH 335 African-American Art (3) 
HIST 135 African Histon- and Culture (3) 

HIST 328 Historv of East Africa (3) 

HIST 328 History of South .Africa (3) 

HIST 381 African-.\mencan History to the Mid-19th Century (3) 

HIST 382 African-.\merican History since the Mid-1 9th 

Century (3) 
AFST 411 African- American Perspectives (3) 

POSC 470 The Politics of Urban Education (3) 

SOCI 241 Blacks in America: .Myths and Realities (3) 

SOCI 243 Race, Class and Gender (3) 

SOCI 341 Class, Status and Power (3) 

SOCI 343 Sociologv- of Race and Ethnicit)' (3) 

SOCI 37x Race and Crime (3) 

MUSC 123 History of Jazz (3) 

or 
MUSC 125 Honors History of Jazz 
THEA 303 Cultural Diversit)' in Contemporary Theater (3) 

or 
THEA 304 Honors Cultural Diversitv' in Contemporar>' Theater (3) 
PSYC 432 Cross-Cultural Psychologv' (3) 

WMST 370 Topics in Women's Studies: Women of Color (3) 
KNES 470 Racism in Sport (3) 

AMERICAN STUDIES TRACK/MINOR 

Coordinator: Paul Douglas (English) 

OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 218G, 410-704-2943 

The Program 

The American Studies Track is an interdisciplinary program allow- 
ing students to take courses in different academic departments that 
focus on the concept of American culture. The American studies 
approach emphasizes the interrelatedness of history, literature, the 
arts and popular culture. Students examine American institutions, 
ideas and material forms in order to better understand their past 
and shape their futures. The track is designed for those students 
who may wish to have careers in fields such as teaching, law, muse- 
um work, and journalism where a broad knowledge of American 
history and culture is desirable. 

A minor is available for those students with another major who 
want to learn more about American culture. 

Students interested in material culture or museum work have the 
opportunity to receive unit for internships at a number of area 
museums or historical sites. 



Requirements for the Track 

Students majoring in the American Studies Track must complete 

45 units with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher in each course. 

Required Lower-Division Courses (12 units) 

AMST 201 Introduction to American Studies (3) 

plus 9 units from the following: 
ANTH 209 .Anthropology of American Culture (3) 
-ARTH 113 Myths and Stories in Art History (3) 
ENGL 230 Mam Currents in American Literature (3) 

HIST 145 History of the United States to the Mid-19th Century (3) 

or 
HIST 146 Histor>- of the United States since the Mid-1 9th Centurv 

(3) 
MUSC 1 1 1 Introduction to American Music (3) 
POSC 103 American National Government (3) 

Required Upper-Division Courses (33 units) 

No more than 9 units may be taken in any one department. 

Anthropolog>' 

ANTH 311 Archaeology of Marj'land (3) 

ANTH 365 North American Indians (3) 

ANTH 383 North American Archaeology (3) 

ANTH 387 Native American Archaeoastronomy (3) 

American Studies 

AMST 491 Directed Readings (3) 

AMST 497 Internship in .Material Culture (3) 



Art History 

ARTH 337 

English 

ENGL 331 
ENGL 353 
ENGL 431 
ENGL 432 
ENGL 433 
ENGL 435 
ENGL 436 
ENGL 437 
ENGL 438 
ENGL 473 
ENGL 476 
ENGL 477 

Geography 
GEOG 420 
GEOG 423 

History 

HIST 306 
HIST 331 
HIST 332 
HIST 345 
HIST 346 
HIST 347 
HIST 348 
HIST 349 
HIST 350 
HIST 351 
HIST 352 
HIST 359 
HIST 360 
HIST 361 
HIST 363 
HIST 364 
HIST 366 
HIST 367 
HIST 368 
HIST 370 
HIST 374 
HIST 375 
HIST 378 
HIST 379 



American An (3) 



American Drama (3) 

History of American English (3) 

Literature of the .American Romantic Period (3) 

Literature of the .-Vmerican Realistic Period (3) 

American Short Story (3) 

Development of the American Novel: 19th Centur)' (3) 

Development of the American Novel: 20th Century (3) 

American Poetr\' through Frost (3) 

.Modern American Poetry (3) 

Topics in American Literature (3) 

Topics in .Multiethnic American Literature (3) 

Topics in Black American Literature (3) 



Geography of .Anglo America (3) 
Geography of .Maryland (3) 



Women in 20th-century American History (3) 

American .Military Histor)- 1898-1945 (3) 

American Military History- since 1945 (3) 

The American Colonies: 1492-1763 (3) 

The American Revolutionary Period: 1763-1789 (3) 

The Early National Period (3) 

The Jacksonian Era (3) 

The Civil War (3) 

The Era of Reconstruction (3) 

The U.S. Age of Enterprise (3) 

The U.S. Age of Reform (3) 

The FD.R. Era (3) 

Recent American History (3) 

Gavs and Lesbians in U.S. History (3) 

Social Historv- of the U.S. to 1865 (3) 

Social Historv- of the U.S. since 1865 (3) 

History of American Business (3) 

Development of the U.S. Constitution (3) 

The Bill of Rights and the Constitution (3) 

Diplomatic History of the U.S. (3) 

The Far Western Frontier (3) 

The Cit)- in American History (3) 

Immigrants and Immigration (3) 

History of Native Americans: The East (3) 



The College of Liberal Arts 



HIST 380 
HIST 381 
HIST 382 

HIST 385 
HIST 389 
HIST 397 

Kinesiology 

KNES 357 
KNES441 
KNES 451 

Music 

MUSC 421 

Philosophy 

PHIL 326 

Political Science 
POSC 305 
POSC 355 
POSC 381 
POSC 383 
POSC 384 
POSC 417 
POSC 418 
POSC 419 

POSC 432 
POSC 441 

Sociology 
SOCI 329 
SOCI 356 



History of Native Americans: The West (3) 
African-American History to the Mid-19th Century (3) 
African-American History from the Mid-19th 
Century (3) 
American Labor (3) 
Roots of Rock and Roll (3) 
History of Maryland (3) 



Sport in Film (3) 

The American Woman in Sport (3) 

History of Sport in America (3) 



American Music (3) 



American Philosophy (3) 



Urban Government and Politics (3) 

The Latin American Policy of the U.S. (3) 

The Presidency (3) 

Congress (3) 

The Judicial System (3) 

American Political Parties (3) 

Constitutional Law and Politics (3) 

Civil Rights and Civil Liberties: The First and Fourteenth 

Amendments (3) 

U.S. -Russian Relations (3) 

Contemporary U.S. -Western European Relations (3) 



Demography (3) 
Prisons in America (3) 



Other courses relating to American culture may be substituted with 
the approval of the program coordinator. 

AMERICAN STUDIES MINOR 

The minor in American Studies is designed for students majoring 
in another discipline who wish to learn more about American 
culture. Students minoring in American Studies must complete 21 
units with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher in each course. 

Required Lower-Division Courses (9 units) 

AMST 201 Introduction to American Studies (3) 

Plus 

6 units from the follnwmg: 

ANTH 209 Anthropology of American Culture (3) 

ARTH 1 13 Myths and Stories in American Art (3) 

ENGL 230 Main Currents in American Literature (3) 

HIST 145 History of the United States to the Mid-19th Century (3) 

or 
HIST 146 History of the United States since the Mid-19th Century (3) 

MUSC 1 1 1 Introduction to American Music (3) 
POSC 103 American National Government (3) 

Required Upper-Division Courses (12 units) 

Students choose 12 units from the above list of upper-division 
courses for the major. No more than 6 units may be taken in any 
one department. Students should select courses in consultation 
with the American Studies coordinator. 



ANIMAL BEHAVIOR TRACK 

Advisory Committee: Michael Figler {Psychology), Donald 
Forester {Biological Sciences), Paz Galupo {Psychology, 
Co-Coordinator), Craig Johnson {Psychology), Scott Johnson 
{Biological Sciences), Jay Nelson {Biological Sciences), Herbert 
Petri {Psychology), ]oan Rabin {Psychology), Gerald Robinson 
{Biological Sciences), Aubrey Scarbrough {Biological Sciences), 
Erik Scully {Biological Sciences, Co-Coordinator), Richard 
Siegel (Biological Sciences), Joel Snodgrass (Biological Sciences) 

OFFICE 

Smith Hall 261, 410-704-3012 

The Program 

The study of animal behavior has received an increasing amount 
of attention from the public because of the emphasis placed by 
zoological parks on behavioral biology and the large number of 
presentations in the media regarding animal behavior and sociobi- 
ology. 

The Animal Behavior Track is designed to offer a solid founda- 
tion in the diverse approaches used to study behavioral biology. 
The program uses a carefully selected combination of courses in 
biology and psychology to achieve this goal. In addition, students 
are required to complete either an independent research project or 
an internship in order to apply their knowledge in an intensive 
research experience. 

Students who complete the program may be qualified for posi- 
tions at zoological parks, aquariums and nature centers. In addi- 
tion, they will have the necessary technical knowledge to pursue a 
career in freelance writing about animal behavior. However, stu- 
dents who are considering attending graduate school will need to 
complete additional courses in either biology or psychology. Most 
of the students currently enrolled in the program also are majoring 
in either Biology or Psychology. 

Students who are considering the Animal Behavior Track must 
meet with one of the program coordinators before declaring 
Interdisciplinary Studies as a major. 

Requirements for the Track 

The Animal Behavior Track requires students to complete 45 units 
with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. If 45 units have not been 
reached following completion of the required courses, the addi- 
tional course or courses must be taken from the biology or psy- 
chology electives list (see below). 

Required Courses (31-32 units) 

BIOL 1 10 Contemporary General Biology (4) 

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) 

BIOL 207 General Zoology (4) 

PSYC 212 Behavioral Stanstics (4) 

BIOL 371 Animal Behavior (3) 

PSYC 460 Ethology and Comparative Psychology (3) 

PSYC 314 Research Methods in Psychology (4) 

or 
BIOL 381 Biological Literature (3) 

BIOL 413 Evolution (3) 

PSYC: 491 Independent Investigation in Psychology (3)# 

or 
BIOL 491 Independent Research in Biology (3)# 

or 
BIOL 493 Internship in Biology 

or 
IDIS 495 Internship in Interdisciplinary Studies (3) 



Interdisciplinary Studies Program 



161 



Biology Elecrives 

A minimum of two courses from the folloti'ing ': 

BIOL 351 Field and Systematic Vertebrate Zoology (4) 

BIOL 353 Invenebrate Zoology (4) 

BIOL 367 Endocrinology (3) 

BIOL 402 General Ecology (4) 

BIOL 456 Ornithology (4) 

BIOL 458 Mammalogy (4) 

BIOL 461 Entomology (4) 

BIOL 465 Mammalian Physiology (4) 

BIOL 467 Herpetology (4) 

BIOL 469 Comparative Animal Physiology (4) 

BIOL 48 1 Directed Readings m Biology ( 1-3 )# 

Psychology Elecrives 

A minimum of two courses from the following': 

PSYC 305 Psychology of Learning (3) 

PSYC 309 Psychopharmacology (3) 

PSYC 315 Motiyauon(3) 

PSYC 317 Sensation and Perception (3) 

PSYC 341 Environmental Psychology (3) 

PSYC 381 Readings in Psychology (l-3)# 

PSYC 447 Sex Differences: Psychological Perspectives (3) 

PSYC 465 Physiological Psychology (3) 

PSY'C 486 Advanced Experimental Design (3) 

PSYC 470-479 Special Topics in Psychology* 

#Must be appro\ ed by coordinatot 

'Students should consult this catalog for course prerequisites and discuss 

all course selections with their advisers. 

ASIAN STUDIES TRACK/MINOR 

Advisory Committee: Samuel Collins {Sociology, Anthropology 
and Criminal Justice), Steve Coutinho {Philosophy and 
Religious Studies), Karl Fugelso {Art), Douglas Herman 
{Geography and Environmental Planning), Jeong-Joon Lee 
{Economics), Jenny Li {Modern Languages), Junko Morishita 
{Modern Languages), Steven Phillips {History, Coordinator) 

OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 119A, 410-704-2912 

The Program 

The Asian Studies Track within the Interdisciplinary Studies major 
is designed to offer students an interdisciplinarv' program of study 
of various dimensions of the Asian world. Students may plan a 
course of study that concentrates on a particular aspect of Asian 
civilization or on a particular sub-region of Asia. One might, for 
example, focus on the art and philosophy of various Asian peoples, 
or instead, one might choose to concentrate on Chinese, Indian or 
Japanese civilization, studying both the traditional and modern 
society, its physical setting, and its political and economic develop- 
ment. In order to build a sound program of study, which meets 
both the individual student's needs and the Interdisciplinary Studies 
requirements, it is essential that students work closely with an 
adviser in planning the program and selecting courses. 

A second option open to students interested in specializing in 
Asian Studies is the International Studies major with a regional spe- 
cialization. 

Requirements for the Track 

1. Twelve units of a foreign language appropriate to the student's 
designated area of interest in Asia. The Asian language courses 
presently offered at Towson are listed below. The Advisory 
Committee may waive the language requirement for native 
speakers of Japanese, Chinese or another language related to the 
student's course of study. In this case, students must earn a total 
of 45 units instead of the 33 detailed in point 2 below. 



2. A minimum of ii units selected from the following list of courses, 
but with courses from at least three departments (in addition to 
language) represented. Other courses not shown on the list, but 
which are relevant to Asia (such as directed readings courses and 
Minimester courses) may be accepted with the approval of the 
Advisory Committee. Excluding language courses, no more than 
four courses below the 300 level may be taken for unit in this 
program. 

3. All courses must be completed with a grade equivalent of 2.00 
or higher. 

4. Students may transfer up to 21 credits toward the completion of 
the major. 



Approved Courses 



Art History 

ARTH 331 
ARTH 333 

Geography 
GEOG'443 
GEOG 445 
GEOG 447 

Histon' 

HIST 10" 
HIST 109 
HIST 110 
HIST 111 
HIST 310 
HIST 311 
HIST 312 
HIST 313 
HIST 315 
HIST 316 
HIST 318 
HIST 319 
HIST 320 



Art of China (3) 
Art of Japan (3) 



Geography of East Asia (3) 

Geography of South and Southeast Asia (3) 

Geography of the Middle East (3) 



Introduction to History of Islamic Civilization (3) 
Introduction to the Civilization of India (3) 
East Asian Civilizations to the 17th Century (3) 
Modern East Asia since the 17th Century (3) 
Nationalism in East and Southeast Asia (3) 
Traditional India: Its Historical Development (3) 
History of .Modem India (3) 
History of Modern Southeast Asia (3) 
Imperial China: The Last Dynasty (3) 
Revolutionary China (3) 
Modern Korea (3) 
Japan: 1830-1930(3) 
Japan: 1930-Present (3) 



Language 

CHNS 10 1-102 Elementary Modern Chinese I, II (3, 3) 
CHNS 201-202Chinese Intermediate I, II (3, 3) 
JPNS 101-102 Japanese Elements I, II (3, 3) 
JPNS 201-202 Japanese Intermediate I, II (3, 3) 

Philosophy-Religious Studies 

PHIL 219 Introduction to Asian Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 301 Philosophies of India (3) 

PHIL 302 Philosophies of China and Japan (3) 

PHIL 357 Comparative Religion (3) 



Political Science 
POSC 439 
POSC 445 



U.S. Foreign Policy in Southeast Asia (3) 
U.S. Foreign Policy in South Asia (3) 



Sociology-Anthropology-Criminal Justice 

ANTH 3.\.\ Korea, Globalizanon and Anthropology (3) 

Minor in Asian Studies 

The minor in Asian Studies is designed for students majoring in 
another discipline yet interested in acquiring knowledge of Asian 
nations and cultures without completing the major program above. 
Students minoring in Asian Studies must complete 21 units from 
the courses listed above with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher 
in each course. No more than three courses (9 units) may be lower- 
division. Students must select courses in at least three disciplines m 
consultation with the Asian Studies program coordinator. 



162 



The College of Liberal Arts 



Asian Languages 

There is no language requirement for the Asian Studies minor. 
However, students are encouraged to begin the study of an Asian 
language. One 3-unit, 100-level language course may be applied 
toward lower-division course unit. 

BUSINESS, COMMUNICATION AND THE LIBERAL 
ARTS MINOR 

Director: Linda Mahin {English) 

OFFICE 

Lmthicum Hall 201 D, 410-704-5197 

The Program 

The interdisciplinary minor in Business, Communication and the 
Liberal Arts (BCLA) was developed in 1997 in response to needs 
expressed by national and local business executives. Students pos- 
sessing this minor to complement their major will help meet the 
growing demand for graduates who have strong oral and written 
communication skills, the ability to think critically and creatively 
in solving problems, and a general knowledge of business culture 
and practices. 

BUSINESS, COMMUNICATION AND THE LIBERAL 
ARTS MLNOR 

This rigorous minor for liberal arts majors and others consists of 
24 units. The minor emphasizes the skills that are important for 
successful job performance over time and recognizes the business 
community's need for broadly educated, articulate college gradu- 
ates. Completion of all required minor courses with a minimum 
3.00 GPA is prerequisite to enrollment in BCLA 421 Integrating 
Management Skills. Application materials are available in the 
interdisciplinary studies office, the admissions office, the Academic 
Advising Center, or by calling Dr. Mahin, 410-704-5197. 
Applications can be made at any time, but please see the director, 
as well as including the minor on your declaration of major/minor 
form. 

Required Courses (24 units) 

ACCT 201* Accounting Principles 1 ( i) 

BCLA 421 Integrating Management Skills (3) 

BUSX 101 Introduction to Business (3) 

COMM 315 Business and Professional Communication (3) 

cose 111* Information Technology for Business (3) 

ECON 201* Microeconomic Principles (3) 

ENGL 317 Writing for Business and Industry (3) 

PHIL 371 Business Ethics (3) 

Completion of all other required minor courses with a minimum 
3.00 GPA is prerequisite to enrollment in BCLA 421. 

And one course selected from the following: 

ANTH 209* Anthropology of American Culture (3) 

ENGL 263 Tradition and Form in Western Fiction (3) 

PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy (3) 

POSC 107 Introduction to International Relations (3) 

Recommended Courses 

Students in the BCT.A minor are encouraged to enroll in some of 
the following courses to fulfill graduation requirements. Students 
should discuss these options with their advisers. These recom- 
mended courses may not be used to replace any of the minor 
requirements. 

COMM 304 Persuasion (3) 
COMM 379 Intcrcultural Communication (3) 
ECON 202* Macrocconomic Principles (3) 
FREN331 French for Business (3) 



GEOG 105 Geography of International Affairs (3) 

GERM 331 German for Business (3) 

HIST 146 History of the U.S. since the Mid-19th Century (3) 

IDIS 460-469 Internship in Interdisciplinary Studies (3) 

LEGE 225 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

MCOM 385 Mass Media and Society (3) 

MKTG 341 Principles of Marketing (3) 

MNGT361 Management and Organization Theory (3) 

PSYC 327 Industrial Psychology (3) 

SOCl 334 Industrial Sociology (3) 

SOCI 335 Medical Sociology (3) 

SPAN 331 Spamsh for Business (3) 

* Honors College versions of these courses may be used to also fulfill 

Honors College requirements. 

CLASSICAL STUDIES MINOR 

Aduisory Committee: Jennifer Ballengee (English), Rose Ann 
Christian (Philosophy and Religious Studies), Victor Fisher 
(Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice), John McLucas 
(Modern Languages), Allaire Stallsmith (History, Coordinator), 
Sandra Tatman (Art History) 

OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 1 19E, 410-704-2909 
E-mail: astallsmith@towson.edu 

The Program 

Classical Studies includes the study of Greek and Latin and of 
ancient history and civilization, extending ftom the Paleolithic to 
the fall of the Roman Empire in the West in A.D. 476, which have 
fotmed the core of liberal arts leatning in the West for centuries. 
The Classical Studies minor incorporates courses drawn from the 
language, litetature, philosophy, history, archaeology, art, theatre, 
geography, religious studies and Jewish studies programs, offering 
students an opportunity to specialize in the disciplines of antiquity. 
The Classical Studies minot helps students majoring in various 
fields to focus theif intetests and gives coherence to their programs. 

Trained to integrate the past with the present, classicists are 
found not only in their ttaditional havens-universities, museums, 
archaeological projects, and research centets-but also as valuable 
team members in such diverse fields as international business, pub- 
lic educational programs, documentary filmmaking, publishing, 
marketing, mass communications, medicine, and the law. 

Students in the Baltimore-Washington area have unique oppor- 
tunities for research and hands-on learning at the Walters Art 
Museum, the Center for Hellenic Studies, Dumbarton Oaks, the 
Libtary of Congress, the Smithsonian, and the libraries of Johns 
Hopkins University and the University of Maryland. 

Minor in Classical Studies 

The minor in Classical Studies consists of 24 units. It is designed for 
students who would like to take a specialized core of classical stud- 
ies courses. 

Required Courses (9 units) 

HIST 101 Introduction to Ancient Civilizations (3) 

LATN 101 L.itin Elements I (3) 

LATN 102 latin Elements II (3) 

or 
GRK 103 Ancient Greek Elements 1 (3) 

GRK 104 Ancient Greek Elements II (3) 

NOTE: The language requirement may be waived by passing a pro- 
ficiency exam; in that case, 6 units would be made up by choices 
from the recommended courses listed below. 



Interdisciplinary Studies Program 



163 



Recommended Courses (15 units) 

Five additional courses (15 units) should be chosen from the fol- 
lowing list, with no more than two courses (6 units) in any one 
department. 

Anthropology 

ANTH 208 Human Evolution and Prehistory (3) 
ANTH 38 1 Archaeological Methods and Theory (3) 



Art History 

ARTH 301 
ARTH 306 

English 

ENGL 243 
ENGL 341 
ENGL 343 
ENGL 351 

Geography 
GEOG 109 
GEOG 357 

History 

HIST 275 
HIST 301 
HIST 303 
HIST 304 
HIST 305 



Origins of Western Art (3) 
Classical Art and Archaeology (3) 



Introduction to Classical Mytholog)' (3) 
History and Literature of the Old Testament (3) 
Myth and Literature (3) 
Historical Linguistics (3) 



Introduction to Human Geography (3) 
Cultural Geography (3) 



History of Ancient Israel (3) 
Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations (3) 
Alexander the Great and His Successors (3) 
Ancient Greek Civilization (3) 
Roman Civilization (3) 



Latin 

LATN 201-202 Latin Intermediate mi (3,3) 

LATN 301-302 Advanced Readings in Lann I/II (3,3) 



Philosophy 

REST 206 
PHIL 221 
PHIL 322 
REST 355 
PHIL 470 

Theatre 

THEA211 



Judaism, Christianiry and Islam (3) 
Ancient Greek Philosophy (3) 
Hellenistic and Medieval Philosophy (3) 
Introduction to the New Testament (3) 
Plato (3) 



History of Theatre and Drama to 1600 (3) 



COMPARATIVE ETHNIC STUDIES MINOR 

Advisory Committee: Lena Ampadu (English), Evelyn Avery 
(English, Coordinator), Elizabeth Clifford (Sociology, 
Anthropology and Criminal Justice), John Gissendanner 
(English), Barbara Leons (Sociology, Anthropology and 
Criminal Justice), Frances Rothstein (Sociology, Anthropology 
and Criminal Justice) 

OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 219D, 410-704-2865 

The Program 

More than 100 years ago Walt Whitman described America as a 
"nation of nations." Today, the United States remains a nation of 
many peoples who have blended their Old World traditions with 
their New World experiences. Ethnic diversity is especially evident 
in Baltimore where Black, Greek, Hispanic, Irish, Italian, Jewish, 
Polish, Ukrainian, and American Indian individuals and others 
retain distinctive identities and contribute to the vitality of the 
nation. The minor in Comparative Ethnic Studies is designed for 
students who wish to have a broader and deeper understanding of 
the variety of peoples who comprise American culture. It is a mean- 
ingful complement to any major. The minor offers an interdiscipli- 
nary approach and exposure to different cultures in America. 



Minor in Comparative Ethnic Studies 

The minor in Comparative Ethnic Studies consists of 18 units of 
required and elective courses. Each course must be completed with 
a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. 

Required Courses (6 units) 

ENGL 235 Ethnic-American Literature (3) 
SOCI 343 Minority Groups (3) 

Electives (12 units) 

No more than one course may be at the 200 level. No more than 

two courses may be taken in any one discipline. 

ANTH 365 North American Indians (3) 

ANTH 388 Peasant Cultures (3) 

ECON 333 Economics of Poverty and Discrimination (3) 

ECON 351 Urban Economics (3) 

ENGL 233 Survey of African-American Literature (3) 

ENGL 234 Major Writers in African-American Literature (3) 

ENGL 236 American Indian Literature 1772-Present (3) 

ENGL 239 19th and 20th Century Jewish Literature (3) 

ENGL 476 Topics in .Multiethnic Literature (3)* 

ENGL 477 Topics in Black-American Literature (3) 

GEOG 385 Population and Settlement (3) 

HIST 277 A Survey of Jewish History (3) 

HIST 375 The Cit)' in .American History (3) 

HIST 378 Immigrants and Immigration in the United States (3) 

HIST 379 History of Native Americans: The East (3) 

HIST 380 History of Native Americans: The West (3) 

HIST 381 African-American Histor>' to the Mid-19th Century (3) 

HIST 382 African-American History from the Mid 19th Century (3) 

pose 305 Urban Government and Politics (3) 

SOCI 241 Blacks in ,\merica: M>lhs and Reality (3) 

SOCI 370-379 Topics in Sociology (3) 

(The American Jewish Community, when offered) 

*Topics in Multiethnic Literature (ENGL 476) may be taken 
only once for the minor in Comparative Ethnic Studies. 

IRISH STUDIES MINOR 

Advisory Committee: Evelyn Avery (English), Thomas Casciero 
(Theatre Arts), John Connolly (English), James Coughlin 
(Mathematics), James DiLisio (Geography and Environmental 
Planning, Coordinator), K Edgington (English), Clarinda 
Harriss (English), Michael Keating (English), James Paulsen 
(Art), Joseph Rudolph (Political Science), Timothy Sullivan 
{Economics) 

OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 26, 410-704-2971 
Fax: 410-704-4702 
E-mail: jdilisio@towson.edu 

The Program 

The Irish Studies minor draws on the resources of several different 
departments in various colleges of the university. The minor is 
designed for students whose intellectual interest is focused on 
another discipline, but who would like to enhance their knowledge 
of Irish culture under the scholarly guidance of faculty members 
in an organized program. The program offers an interdisciplinan' 
approach to the study of the Irish experience by way of various 
viewpoints and methodologies. The Irish Studies minor comple- 
ments major academic programs of study such as art, English, eco- 
nomics, geography, history, political science and theatre. This pro- 
gram provides an option for any student in the university inter- 
ested in Irish culture. 

The Irish Studies minor is constantly subject to revision and 
expansion as a result of regular evaluation and review by an advi- 
sory committee representing participating departments. New 
courses, special topics, Minimester courses, directed research and 



164 



The College of Liberal Arts 



travel study may be accepted for this minor with the approval of 
the advisory committee. Units toward the minor may also be 
earned as part of a study abroad program in Ireland with the 
approval of the Irish Studies Advisory Committee prior to the 
experience. Application for study abroad must be made through 
the Towson University Study Abroad program director. 

Minor in Irish Studies 

A minimum of 21 units is required for the Irish Studies minor. 

Required Courses {6 units) 

HIST 201 A Survey of Irish History (3) 

ENGL 229 Modern Irish Literature (3) 

Electives (15 units, 9 upper-level) 

No more than two courses may be taken in any one discipline without 
permission. 



Art 

ART 311 
ART 339 
ART 407 
ARTH 495 

Economics 

ECON 470 

ECON 495 

English 
ENGL 235 
ENGL 476 

Geography 
GEOG 448 
GEOG451 
GEOG 494 
GEOG 495 
GEOG 496 

History 

HIST 496 
HIST 497 



Wood: Concept and Process (3) 
Metal: Concept and Process (3) 
Ceramics: Clay Sculpture (3) 
Independent Study in Art History (3) 



Topics in Economics: Irish and British Economic 
Development (3) 
Independent Study (1-3) 



Ethnic-American Literature (3) 

Topics in Multiethnic American Literature (3) 



Conflict in Ireland (3) 
Geography of Europe (3) 
Travel and Study in Ireland (3-6) 
Directed Readings in Geography (3) 
Independent Study in Geography (1-6) 



Directed Individual Research (2-4) 
Directed Reading (2-4) 



Irish Studies 

IRST 465-467 Topics in Irish Studies (3) 

Political Science 

POSC 470 Ethnic Conflict and Public Policy (3) 



Theatre Arts 
THEA 271 



Special Topics: Modern Irish Theater (3) 



In all electives to be used in the Irish Studies minor, the student's 
research paper, directed readings, or major project must be related 
to Ireland and the Irish culture. Other courses related to Irish 
Studies may be elected with the permission of the Irish Studies 
advisers. 



JEWISH STUDIES MINOR 

Advisory Committee: Evelyn Avery {English, Coordinator), Rose 
Ann Christian {Philosophy and Religious Studies), Howard 
Kaplon {Mathematics), Michael Lavine (Computer and 
Information Sciences), Nitza Nachmias (Political Science), 
Douglas Pryor (Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice), 
Allaire Stallsmith (History), Lisa Ziv (Marketing and 
e-Business) 

OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 21 9D, 410-704-2865 
Fax:410-704-3999 

The Program 

Drawing on the resources of six different departments, the Jewish 
Studies minor is designed for students whose vocational and/or 
intellectual interest centers on another discipline, but who would 
also like to deepen their knowledge of Jewish history, literature and 
religion in an organized, directed manner. 

The Jewish Studies minor also provides students with not only a 
link to the past, but with a connection to the present and future. 
The minor also focuses on Jewish culture, education, politics, val- 
ues and way of life, and how the Jewish community interacts with 
society as a whole. Although not as comprehensive as a concentra- 
tion, the minor offers an interdisciplinary approach to the Jewish 
experience, set in the wider context of ancient and modern society. 
Knowledge of Judaism is essential to understanding Christianity 
and Islam, so a minor in Jewish Studies will appeal to those from 
different religious backgrounds. 

A minor in Jewish Studies can provide students with many 
opportunities, including departmental internships and work in 
communal service or education. Students with a minor in Jewish 
Studies have gone on to pursue careers in education, social work, 
journalism, fund-raising, and counseling, as well as in Jewish 
organizations. 

Students from throughout the university are welcome to under- 
take the minor, despite its course concentration in the College of 
Liberal Arts. 

The Jewish Studies minor will be subject to revision and expan- 
sion in the future, as courses are evaluated by a permanent advisory 
committee which will monitor the program. New courses, special 
topics, or Minimester courses may be accepted for the minor, or 
counted toward it, with the approval of the advisory committee. 

Minor in Jewish Studies 

A minimum of 21 units is required for the minor in Jewish Studies. 

Required Courses (6 units) 

HIST 277 A Survey of Jewish History (3) 

ENGL 239 19th- and 20th-century Jewish Literature (3) 

or 
ENGL 249 Honors 19th- and 20th-century Jewish Literature (3) 

Electives (15 units, 12 upper level) 

No more than two courses may be taken in any discipline. 



English 

ENGL 235 
ENGL 253 
ENGL 341 
ENGL 476 



History 
HIST 275 
HIST 484 



Ethnic-American Literature (3) 

The Bible and Literature (3) 

History and Literature of the Old Testament (3) 

Topics in Multiethnic Literature (when applicable to 

Jewish Studies) (3) 



Ancient Israel (3) 

Topics in History (when applicable to Jewish Studies) 



Interdisciplinary Studies Program 



165 



Philosophy 
PHIL 105' 
PHIL 206 
PHIL 353 
PHIL 35" 



Introduction to the Study of Religion (3) 
Judaism, Christianit)' and Islam (3) 
Philosophy of Religion (3) 
Comparative Religions (3) 



Sociology-Anthropology 
SOCI 343 Minority Groups (3) 

SOCI 370-379 Topics in Sociology (The American Jewish 
Community, when offered) (3) 

Hebrew 

HEBR 101-102 Elements of Hebrew I, II (3, 3) 

Other courses related to Jewish Studies may be elected with the per- 
mission of the Jewish Studies advisers. 

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES TRACK/MINOR 

Advisory Committee: Colleen Ebacher {Modem Languages), 
Jose Lopez-Gonzalez {Philosophy and Religious Studies), 
Cristina Magaldi {Music), Ronn Pineo [History, Coordinator), 
Lea Ramsdell {Modern Languages), Frances Rothstein 
{Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal justice), Sandra Tatman 
{Art] 

OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 119N, 410-704-2918 

The Program 

The Latin American Studies Track within the Interdisciplinar\' 
Studies major allows students to approach the study of Latin 
America as an area from an interdisciplinary perspective. It is an 
appropriate track for those intending to pursue Latin American 
Studies or Spanish at the graduate level, for those anticipating living 
or working in Latin America, or for those wishing to acquire 
expertise in Latin America for a career in government or business. 

The Latin American Studies Committee administers the pro- 
gram. Students should select one of the members of the committee 
as an adviser. 

Training in Latin American studies is an excellent preparation 
for careers in education, business and government. Graduates find 
employment with business such as export/import companies, 
international banks, tour and travel companies, and the interna- 
tional media. Government agencies, such as the State Department 
and the Department of Immigration seek individuals trained In 
Latin American studies. Employment opportunities exist for trans- 
lators, researchers, and in other areas. 

Requirements for the Track 

Students in the Latin American Studies Track complete SPAN 301 
or its equivalent, and a minimum of 36 units. The track requires 6 
units in foundations courses, 6 units in advanced study courses, a 
6-unit capstone experience, and 18 units of electives. Students must 
complete a minimum of 6 units in at least three of the following dis- 
ciplines: anthropology, art history, history, geography, music, 
applied music, political science or Spanish. 

Like all Interdisciplinary Studies majors, students choosing this 
track must complete a total of at least 45 units of upper-division 
course work from the departments of arts and sciences. 

All course work must be completed with a grade equivalent of 
2.00 or higher. 



1. Foundations (6 units) 

LAST 100* Latin America: Issues and Approaches (3) (Cornerstone) 

GenEd. I.B) 
HIST 122 Latin America: National Period (3) 

'LAST 100 may be waived by the coordinator of Latin American Studies if 
the student has already completed the GenEd LB requirement at the time 
the student enters the Latin American Studies Program. The student may 
select any 3-unit elective as a replacement. 

2. Advanced Study (6 units) 

Select two of the following: 

ANTH 353 Latinas in the Americas (3) 

HIST 324 Democratization in Latin America (3) 

POSC 351 The Government and Politics of Latin America (3) 

SPAN 312 Culture and Civilizations of the Spanish-Speaking 

Peoples II (3) 
SPAN 455 Hispanic Popular Cultures (3) 

3. Capstone Experience (6 units) 

Latin American Studies students should plan early how they intend 
to fulfill their capstone requirement. Participation in the study 
abroad program in Latin America is strongly recommended. 

Option One (recommended) 

Study Abroad Experience in Latin America (see guidelines) 

Option Ttvo 

Select two of the following: 

LAST 491-492 Directed Readings in Latin American Studies (3-6) 

LAST 497 Internship in Latin American Studies (3-6) 

POSC 385 Model Organization of American States (3)* 

HONR 499 Honors Thesis (in Latin American Studies Themes) (3)'* 

'available only as independent study 

* *open to honors program students only 

4. Electives (18 units) 

Select an additional 18 units from the list of approved units in Latin 
American Studies below. 



Anthropology 
ANTH 351 
ANTH 353 
ANTH 366 
ANTH 369 
ANTH 370-379 
ANTH 470-479 
ANTH 491 
ANTH 492 
ANTH 495 
ANTH 498 
ANTH 499 
"when concerned 

Art History 

ARTH 339 

Geography 
GEOG 461 
GEOG 470-479 
GEOG 494 
GEOG 495 
GEOG 496 



Drugs in the Americas (3) 
Latinas in the Americas (3) 
South American Indians (3) 

Tradition and Revolution in Latin American Society (3) 
Topics in Anthropology* (3) 
Special Topics in Anthropology* (3) 
Internship 1 in .\nthropology* (3) 
Internship II in .\nthropology* (3) 
Independent Research* (3) 
Honors Readings in Anthropology* (4) 
Honors Thesis in Anthropology* (4) 
with Latin America 



Latin American Art: 1800 to Present (3) 



Geography of Latin America (3) 
Topics in Geography* (3) 
Travel and Study* (3-6) 
Directed Readings in Geography* (3) 
Directed Study in Geography* (1-6) 



*when concerned with Latin America 



166 



The College of Liberal Arts 



History 

HIST 121 Latin America: Colonial Period (3) 

HIST 307 The Andean Republics (3) 

HIST 321 History of Mexico: Colonial Period (3) 

HIST 322 History of Mexico: National Period (3) 

HIST 324 Democratization m Latin America (3) 

HIST 484 Historical Themes' (3) 

HIST 493 Internship' (3-6) 

HIST 497 Directed Readings' (1-4) 

HIST 498 Honors Directed Readings' (2-4) 

HIST 499 Honors Thesis' (4-8) 

'when concerned with Latin America 

International Studies 

INST 494 International Studies Abroad' (3) 

INST 496 International Studies Research* (3) 

'when concerned with Latin America 

Latin American Studies 

LAST 484 Special Topics in Latin American Studies (3) 

LAST 491-492 Directed Readings in Latin American Studies (3) 
LAST 497 Internship in Latin American Studies (3-6) 

Music Applied 

MUSA 170, 370 World Music Ensemble'(l) 
'when concerned with Latin America 

Music 

MUSC 1 10 Honors Introduction to World Music' (3) 

MUSC 471 Special Topics in Music' (3) 

'when concerned with Latin America 



Philosophy 

PHIL 328 

Political Science 
POSC351 
POSC 355 
POSC 385 

POSC 437 



Latin American Philosophy (3) 



Government and Politics of Latin America (3) 
Latin American Policy of the U.S. (3) 
Model Organization of American States (3) 
(available only as Independent Study) 
Castro and the Cuban Revolution (3) 



(3) 



POSC 470-479 Special Topics in Political Science' (3) 

POSC 490 Independent Study' (1-3) 

POSC 491 Seminar: Contemporary U.S. Foreign Policy' 

POSC 493 Internship' (3-9) 

POSC 498 Directed Readings in Political Science* (1-3) 

POSC 499 Honors Thesis' (3) 

'when concerned with Latin America 



Spanish 

SPAN 302 Composition and Conversation II (3) 

SPAN 312 Culture and Civilization of the Spanish-Speaking 

Peoples II (3) 

SPAN 331 Spanish for Business (3) 

SPAN 439 Literary Movements in Spanish-American Literature (3) 

SPAN 444 20th-century Spanish-American Literature (3) 

SPAN 455 Hispanic Popular Culture" (3) 

SPAN 470 Special Topics' (3) 

SPAN 491 Directed Readings in Spanish Literature' (1-3) 

SPAN 492 Directed Readings in Spanish' (1-3) 

SPAN 494 Travel Study Abroad' (3-16) 

SPAN 495 Internship for Proficiency in Spanish* (3) 

SPAN 497 Internship in Spanish' (3) 
'when concerned with Latin America 

Minor in Latin American Studies 

The minor in Latin American Studies requires SPAN 301 or its 
equivalent, and a minimum of 21 units. Students complete 6 units 
in foundations courses, 3 units in advanced study courses, a 3-unit 
Capstone experience, and 9 units of electives. Courses must be 
selected from at least three of the following disciplines: anthropol- 
ogy, history, geography, political science or Spanish. All course 
work must be completed with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. 



1. Foundations (6 units) 

LAST 100 Latin America: Issues and Approaches' (Cornerstone) 

(GenEd I.B) 
HIST 122 Introduction to Modern Latin America (3) 

*LAST 100 may be waived by the coordinator of Latin American Studies if 
the student has already completed the GenEd I.B requirement at the time 
the student enters the Latin American Studies Program. The student may 
select any 3-unit elective as a replacement. 

Advanced Study (3 units) 

Select one of the follnwing: 

ANTH 353 Latinas in the Americas (3) 

HIST 324 Democratization in Latin America (3) 

POSC 351 The Government and Politics of Latin America (3) 

SPAN 312 Culture and Civilizations of the Spanish-Speaking Peoples 

11(3) 
SPAN 455 Hispanic Popular Cultures (3) 

Capstone Experience (3 units) 

Latin American Studies students should plan early how they intend 
to fulfill their capstone requirement. 

Option One (recommended) 

Study Abroad Experience in Latin America (see guidelines) 

Option Two 

Select one of the following: 

LAST 493 Internship in Latin American Studies (3) 

LAST 497 Directed Readings in Latin American Studies (3) 

POSC 385 Model Organization of American States (3)* 

HONR 499 Honors Thesis in Latin American Studies Themes (3)** 

'available only as independent study 

**open to honors program students only 

4. Electives (9 units) 

Select an additional 9 units from the list of approved courses in 

Latin American Studies. 

Suggested Majors to Combine with Latin American 
Studies Minor 

The minor in Latin American Studies provides an excellent com- 
plement to the following majors: Anthropology, Business 
Administration, International Business, International Studies, 
History, Political Science and Spanish. See the coordinator of Latin 
American Studies for details. 

Guidelines for Study Abroad 

Students may attend any Latin American study abroad program 
approved by the Towson University Study Abroad Office. Students 
studying abroad earn units toward fulfilling the Towson University 
Latin American Studies Program requirements only by completing 
courses in Latin American Studies-related disciplines (for Spanish 
grammar, composition, and conversation courses, only Spanish 
301, Spanish 302, Spanish 331 or their equivalents may be counted), 
and are subject to the approval of the Latin American Studies coor- 
dinator. Units earned abroad inay not be counted more than once 
toward fulfilling any Latin American Studies Program requirement. 
Travel-study courses to Latin America may also count toward 
the Study Abroad Option of the Latin American Studies Capstone 
Experience requirement, subject to the approval of the Latin 
American Studies coordinator. 

Internships 

Internships may be taken with any department participating in the 
Latin American Studies Program. All internships must be con- 
cerned with Latin America, and are subject to the approval of the 
coordinator of Latin American Studies. 






Interdisciplinary Studies Program 



LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL AND TRANSGENDER 
STUDIES MINOR 

Advisory Committee: David Bergman [English), K Edgington 
[English), M. Paz Galupo [Psychology, Coordinator), Cindy 
Gissendanner [History), Doug Herman (Geography), Joan 
Rabin [Psycholog^•), Steve Satta [Theatre Arts), Deborah 
Shaller [Writing Lab/English), John Tinkler [English) 

OFFICE 

Psychology Building 403, 410-704-3068 

The Program 

The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Studies minor 
addresses issues of sexual orientation from interdisciplinary and 
multicultural perspectives. The growing public visibility and aware- 
ness of diverse sexualities and their cultural and political ramifica- 
tions for individuals, social institutions and communities are evi- 
dent in increased media coverage of political activism and debate 
related to issues of sexual orientation. LGBT Studies is a response 
to these forces in the contemporary world but also represents a 
growing field of scholarship which is in the forefront of developing 
theoretical and methodological innovations in interdisciplinary 
studies. The LGBT Studies minor aims to give students the critical 
skills to analyze a wide range of issues, including the historical evo- 
lution of sexual identities in different cultural settings, the relation- 
ship between gender systems and sexual orientation, the develop- 
ment of lesbian and gay cultural institutions, institutionalized 
forms of heterosexism and homophobia, and the social and politi- 
cal mobilization of LGBT individuals and their allies in efforts to 
eliminate discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. 

Educational Objectives 

1. To familiarize students with major concepts, theories, substan- 
tive findings and works of fiction and nonfiction in the field of 
lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) studies. 

2. To make students aware of the diversity of the attitudes toward 
and the experiences of LGBT individuals in different cultures and 
historical periods. 

3. To examine institutionalized homophobia and heterosexism and 
their impact on the political, social and economic status of LGBT 
individuals. 

4. To investigate the relations between prevailing gender norms and 
systems and the social construction of sexualities and the cultural 
images associated with them. 

5. To examine differences within LGBT communities along lines of 
race, class, gender, ethnicity, age and region and the social and 
political ramifications of such differences for those communities. 

6. To understand the wide range of political strategies used by 
LGBT individuals in the past and the present in their struggles 
against oppression. 

7. To trace the historical evolution of sexual identities and the roles 
of LGBT individuals in reshaping them. 

Required Course (6 units) 

LGBT 101 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender 

Studies (3) 
LGBT 474 Seminar in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender 

Studies (3) 

or 
LGBT 491 Independent Investigations in LGBT Studies (3) 

Electives (12 units) 

Four of the follotving: 

HIST 361 Gays and Lesbians in U.S. History (3) 

ENGL 376 Themes in Literature: Gay Themes in American 

Literature (3) 
PSYC 447 Sex Differences: Psychological Perspectives (3) 

PSYC 457 Gender Identity in Transition (3) 



PSYC 449 Psychology of Lesbian Culture (3) 

WMST 338 Women and Sexuality (3) 

EDUC 201 The Parenting Process (3) 

CLST 303 Identity and Culture (3) 

IDIS 495 Internship in Interdisciplinary Studies 

LGBT 381 Directed Readings in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and 

Transgender Studies (1-3) 
Relevant topics courses, directed readings, and directed individual 
research approved by the Advisory Committee. 

PRELAW 

Coordinator: Jack Fruchtman [Political Science) 

OFFICE 

Lmthicum Hall 118B, 410-704-3350 

The Program 

Students contemplating law school after graduation should make 
an appointment with the university's Prelaw adviser, Dr. Jack 
Fruchtman. He can provide prospective students with a copy of the 
Towson Prelaw Handbook, introduce them to the Prelaw Society, 
and offer advice concerning courses of study, preparation for the 
Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and other matters pertaining to 
what students need for their application to law school. In general, 
students should concentrate on improving their reading, writing 
and speaking skills. 

Dual Law Program 

Towson University offers to qualified students the opportunity to 
apply to the early admission program at the University of Baltimore 
School of Law. Admission is not automatic but is contingent upon 
acceptance by the University of Baltimore Law School (including 
review of LSAT scores). Transfer to the UB law program can only 
take place at the end of a spring term. To qualify for entrance to the 
dual-degree program, students must fulfill the first three of the 
standards listed below; to qualify for graduation from Towson 
University, they must also fulfill the fourth standard listed; 

1. Completion of at least 91 units at TU with at least a 3.00 GPA. 

2. Completion of all TU General Education requirements. 

3. Completion of a major at TU with at least a 3.25 GPA in the 
major. No specific areas of study or disciplines are required for 
this program; accordingly, students may choose majors in which 
they are most interested. 

4. Successful completion of 29 units at the University of Baltimore 
School of Law, and of all other TU graduation requirements as 
listed in the catalog under the heading Degree Requirements. 

Subsequent completion of all requirements at the University of 
Baltimore Law School is necessary in order to earn the J.D. degree 
from the University of Baltimore. Students interested in this pro- 
gram should contact the TU Prelaw adviser, Dr. Jack Fruchtman, in 
the Department of Political Science. 



168 



The College of Liberal Arts 



International Studies Program 

Director: Alison McCartney [Political Science) 
Affiliated Faculty: Kangoh Lee {Economics), George McCool 
(Modern Languages), Wayne McKim (Geography), Michael 
O'Pecko {European Studies), Steven Phillips (Asian Studies), 
Ronn Pineo (History), James Roberts (Political Science), Doug 
Ross (Management), Fran Rothstein (Anthropology) 
Ex-officio: Glenda Henkel {Career Center), Dean Esslinger 
(Academic Affairs) 

OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 118L, 410-704-2958 

Fax:410-704-2960 

E-mail: inst@towson.edu 

THE PROGRAM 

The International Studies Program provides a rigorous interdisci- 
plinary curriculum in international affairs that is designed to 
appeal to students interested in addressing international problems 
and issues through careers in public service, education, business, 
and nonprofit enterprises. The program also provides excellent 
preparation for students wishing to pursue graduate education in 
international studies, law, or international business. The program 
aims to achieve a global perspective through an interdisciplinary 
network of courses and experience that will lead to a Bachelor of 
Arts degree in International Studies. The program is administered 
by a committee of faculty members from the various departments 
and colleges from which the courses are taken. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN INTERNATIONAL 
STUDIES 

All students must complete 48 units (16 courses) in international 
studies to complete the major. Students must complete the core 
curriculum described below (27 units) and one of five tracks of 
courses (21 units). The five tracks are the General Track, 
International Development Track, Asia Track, Europe Track, and 
Latin America Track. The purpose of the tracks is to provide stu- 
dents an opportunity to apply what they learned in the core cur- 
riculum to an issue or region of their choice. All 16 courses must 
be completed with a grade of 2.00 or higher. It is recommended 
that students complete the foundation courses in the core curricu- 
lum before proceeding to the rest of the curriculum. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS 

Students must achieve a level of proficiency equivalent to four 
terms of college-level language training in a modern foreign lan- 
guage that is offered by or can be tested by the Department of 
Modern Languages. The language selected may depend upon the 
International Studies track the student chooses. For example, stu- 
dents in the Latin America Track must achieve proficiency in 
Spanish. Students can fulfill the language requirement for the 
International Studies major through any of the procedures outlined 
in the Meeting B.A. Requirements section of the Department of 
Modern Languages entry in this catalog. Lower-division courses 
taken in a modern language do not count toward the 48 units needed 
to complete the International Studies major. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES CORE COURSES 

The courses meet General Education tequirements as noted. 
Courses used to fulfill a requirement in the core cannot also be used 
to fulfill a requirement in a track. 



Foundation Courses (15 units) 

All of the following: 

ANTH 207 Cultural Anthropology (3) (GenEd II.D) 

ECON 202 Macroeconomic Principles (3) (GenEd 1I.C.2) 

GEOG 105 Geographv of International Affairs (3) (GenEd II.D) 

HIST 151 The World since 1945 (3) (GenEd II.D) 

POSC 107 Introduction to International Relations (3) (GenEd II.D) 

Economics and Management (3 units) 

One of the following: 

ECON 305 Survey of International Economics (3) 

ECON 323 Comparative Economic Systems (3)(GenEd I.D) 

ECON 325 Economic Development (3)(GenEd I.D) 

ECON 421 International Economics (3) 

MNGT 355 International Business (3) 

Geography and History (3 units) 

One of the following: 

GEOG 381 Polincal Geography (3) 

GEOG 427 The Global Economy (3) 

HIST 150 Europe and the Non-European World (3) 

(GenEd II.D.2) 
HIST 103 European Civilization since the 17th Centurv (3) 

(GenEd II.C.l) 
HIST 324 Democratization in Latin America (3) 

HIST 370 Diplomatic History of the United States since 1900 (3) 

Political Science (3 units) 

One of the following: 

POSC 303 Theory of International Relations (3) 

POSC 337 Comparative Governments of Foreign Powers (3) 

POSC 339 Comparative Political Systems (3) 

POSC 428 Political Theory II (3) 

Research and Practicum (3 units) 

One of the following: 

Any 3-unit course in an approved study abroad program 

or 
ANTH 491 Internship in .Anthropology* (3) 
ANTH 37x Ethnographic Field Methods (3) 
ECON 205 Statistics for Business and Economics (3) 
ECON 497 Internship in Economics' (1-3) 
FREN 497 Internship in French' (3) 
GEOG 491 Internship in Geography' (1-6) 
GERM 497 Internship in German' (3) 
HIST 300 Introduction to Historical Study (3) (GenEd LD) 

HIST 493 Internship in History' (3-6) 

INST 493 Internship in International Studies* (3) 

LAST 493 Internship in Latin American Studies' (3) 

POSC 461 Research Methods in Political Behavior (3) 

POSC 493 Internship in Political Science' (3-9) 

SPAN 497 Internship in Spanish* (3) 

or 
An honors thesis if the topic is approved by the director of International 
Studies 

* Internships must be taken for 3 units and must be in work related to 
international studies and must be approved by the student's academic 
adviser or the director of International Studies. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES TRACKS (21 units) 

The tracks are intended to provide students with flexibility in 
designing a curriculum in international studies that addresses their 
interests while maintaining academic rigor and focus. Students 
must complete the course requirements listed for one of the fol- 
lowing tracks. 

GENERAL TRACK (21 upper-division units) 

The General Track is intended to give students a flexible approach 
to developing their skills and knowledge in international studies. 
Students may choose to focus their courses on a particular disci- 
pline (such as economics or geography), or to focus their courses on 
a particular topic (such as international development), or to select 



International Studies Program 



169 



a broad range of courses that provides them with a general under- 
standing of international affairs. The student's academic adviser 
must approve the entire track. 

To complete the General Track, students must take at least 21 
units (seven courses) from the courses listed below. Courses must 
be taken in at least three different departments. No more than two 
lower-division courses (6 units) may be counted toward the 
General Track. Other courses, not listed below, that are relevant to 
international studies (such as special topics courses or directed 
readings courses) may be accepted with the approval of the stu- 
dent's academic adviser. Courses cannot be counted in both the 
International Studies core and the General Track. 

Students must complete through the 202 level or equivalent in a 
foreign language that is offered by or can be tested by the 
Department of Modern Languages. Language units through the 
202 level do not count toward the 21 units needed for the track or 
the 48 units needed for the International Studies ma|or. 

Approved Courses for the General Track in 
International Studies 



Gender in Cross-Culrural Perspective (3) 

Wealth, Power and Politics in Cross-Cultural 

Perspective (3) 

Drugs in the Americas (3) 

Latinas in the Americas (3) 

Peoples of the Middle East (3) 

Development and Industrialization of Cross-Cultural 

Perspective (3) 

Tradition and Revolution in Latin America (3) 

Peasant Cultures (3) 

Special Topics in Anthropology * (1-3) 



Anthropolog\- 


ANTH321 


ANTH 346 


ANTH351 


ANTH 353 


ANTH 367 


ANTH 368 


ANTH 369 


.\NTH 388 


ANTH 47x 


Art History- 


ARTH 331 


ARTH ii3 


Chinese 


CHNS 301 


Economics 


ECON 305 


ECON 321 


ECON 323 


ECON 325 


ECON 421 


ECON 423 


ECON 47x 


English 


ENGL 345 


ENGL 347 


ENGL 439 


ENGL 441 


ENGL 442 


ENGL 471 


Finance 


FIN 435 


French 


FREN 301 


FREN 328 


FREN 329 


FREN 331 


FREN 441 


Geography 


GEOG 381 


GEOG 385 


GEOG 427 


GEOG 431 


GEOG 443 



The Art of China (3) 
The Art of Japan (3) 



Chinese Composition and Conversation I (3) 



Survey of International Economics (3) 

History of Economic Thought (3) 

Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

Economic Development (3) 

International Economics (3) 

International Monetary Theory and Policy (3) 

Topics in Economics * (3) 



Perspectives in World Drama (3) 
World Literature Written in English (3) 
Modern World Poetry (3) 
Modem Fiction to World War II (3) 
Modem Fiction since World War 11 (3) 
Topics in World Literature * (3) 



International Finance (3) 



French Composition and Conversation I (3) 
20th-Centur)- French Literature and Civilization (3) 
Contemporary French Literature and Civilization (3) 
French for Business (3) 
French Literature of the 20th Centurv (3) 



Political Geography (3) 
Population Geography (3) 
The Global Economy (3) 
Geography of Africa (3) 
Geography of East Asia (3) 



GEOG 445 
GEOG 447 
GEOG 448 
GEOG 451 
GEOG 453 
GEOG 461 

German 
GER.M 301 
GERM 311 
GER.M 321 
GERM 331 
GER.M 341 
GERM 441 
GERAI 442 

History 

HIST 307 
HIST 312 
HIST 313 
HIST 315 
HIST 316 
HIST 318 
HIST 319 
HIST 320 
HIST 322 
HIST 324 
HIST 328 
HIST 329 
HIST 331 
HIST 332 
HIST 370 
HIST 384 
HIST 391 
HIST 406 
HIST 415 
HIST 421 
HIST 441 
HIST 452 
HIST 477 
HIST 478 
HIST 479 

Italian 
FTAL 301 

Japanese 

JPNS 301 



Geography ot South and Southeast Asia (3) 
Geography of the Middle East (3) 
Conflict in Ireland (3) 
Geography of Europe (3) 
Geography of the Former U.S.S.R. (3) 
Geography of Latin America (3) 



German Composition and Conversation I (3) 

Culture and Civilization (3) 

Survey of German Literature (3) 

German for Business (3) 

Readings in Contemporary German (3) 

.Modern German Literature (3) 

German Literature since 1945 (3) 



The Andean Republics (3) 

Histor)' of Modern India (3) 

Histor)' of Modern Southeast Asia (3) 

Imperial China: The Last Dynasty (3) 

Revolutionary China (3) 

History of Modern Korea (3) 

Japan, 1830 to 1930(3) 

Japan, 1930 to Present (3) 

History of .Mexico: National Period (3) 

Democratization in Latin America (3) 

History of East Africa from 1820 to Present (3) 

History of South Africa (3) 

American .Military History 1898-1945 (3) 

American .Military History since 1945 (3) 

Diplomatic History of the U.S. since 1900 (3) 

Life Histories of African Women (3) 

Histon^ of Canada (3) 

Europe: 1815-1914 (3) 

Diplomatic Histor>- of Europe: 1815-1939 (3) 

Britain in the 20th Century (3) 

Germany: 1871-1945 (3) 

Russia/Soviet Union: 1894-1953 (3) 

Europe in the Third World (3) 

Histor)- of Terrorism since Mid-1 9th Century (3) 

A History of Diplomacy (3) 



Italian Composition and Conversation I (3) 



Japanese Composition and Conversation I (3) 



Management 

MNGT 375 International Business: Theon.- and Practice (3) 

.MNGT 438 Multinational Management and Strategies (3) 



Marketing 
MKTG 445 



International .Marketing (3) 



Philosophy and Religion 

PHIL 301 Philosophies of India (3) 

PHIL 302 Philosophies of China and Japan (3) 

PHIL 327 African Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 357 Topics in Comparative Religion (3) 

Political Science 

POSC 303 Theory of International Politics (3) 

POSC 307 Contemporary Intemadonal Politics (3) 

POSC 337 Comparative Government of Foreign Powers (3) 

POSC 339 Comparative Political Systems (3) 

POSC 340 Comparative Public Policy (3) 

POSC 351 The Government and Politics of Larin America (3) 

POSC 355 The Latin American Policy of the U.S. (3) 

POSC 385 Model Organization of American States (3) 

POSC 428 Political Theory II (3) 

POSC 432 United States - Russian Relarions (3) 

POSC 434 Comparative Foreign Policy (3) 

POSC 437 Castro and the Cuban Revolution (3) 

POSC 441 Contemporar)' U.S. - European Relanons (3) 



170 



The College of Liberal Arts 



pose 455 International Law and Organization I (3) 

pose 456 International Law and Organization II (3) 

pose 457 Use of Force in International Law (3) 

POSC 47x Special Topics in Political Science ' (3) 

POSC 482 Seminar in Political Science * (3) 

POSC 491 Seminar m U.S. Foreign Policy (3) 

Sociology 

SOCI 329 Demography (3) 

SOCI 333 Political Sociology (3) 

Spanish 

SPAN 301 Spanish Composition and Conversation I (3) 

SPAN 311 Culture and Civilization of Spanish-Speaking Peoples I (3) 

SPAN 312 Culture and Civilization of Spanish-Speakmg Peoples II (3) 

SPAN 321 Sur\'ey of Spanish Literature I (3) 

SPAN 322 Survey of Spanish Literature II (31 

SPAN 331 Spanish for Business (3) 

SPAN 439 Literary Movements in Spanish-American Literature (3) 

SPAN 444 20th-century Spanish-American Literature II (3) 

* Special topics, seminars, and independent study and readings courses 
must be related to international topics to count toward the General Track 
in International Studies. 

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TRACK (21 units) 

The International Development Track is intended to provide stu- 
dents with a thorough understanding of the causes and effects of 
the problems of persistent international underdevelopment. The 
track also provides skills that will prepare students to work in 
international development or to pursue development studies at the 
graduate level. 

Requirements for the International Development Track 

1. To complete the International Development Track, students must 
take at least 21 units from the courses listed below. Students 
must complete the three required courses. Students must take 
four elective courses covering at least three of the four areas list- 
ed below. Other courses, not listed below, that are relevant to 
international studies (such as special topics courses or directed 
readings courses) may be accepted as elective courses with the 
approval of the student's academic adviser. No more than 3 units 
of lower-division courses may be counted toward the 
International Development Track. Courses cannot be counted in 
both the International Studies core and the International 
Development Track. 

2. Students must complete through the 202 level or equivalent in a 
foreign language that is offered by or can be tested by the 
Department of Modern Languages. Language units through the 
202 level do not count toward the 21 units needed for the track 
or the 48 units needed for the International Studies major. 

Required Courses 

ANTH 368 Globalization in Cross-Cultural Perspective |3) 
ECON 325 Economic Development (if ECON 325 is counted in the 
International Studies core, an additional course must be 
taken from the electives below for the International 
Development Track) 
GF.OG 359 Economic Geography (3) 

Electives 

Four courses selected from at least three of the following areas: 



Topical Courses 
ANTH 351 
ANTH 353 
ANTH 388 
ECON 305 
GEOG 385 
POSC 437 
SOCI 329 



Drugs in the Americas (3) 

Latinas in the Americas (3) 

Peasant Cultures (3) 

Survey of International Economics (3) 

Population Cieography (3) 

Castro and the Cuban Revolution (3) 

Demography (3) 



Regional Courses 

ANTH 369 Tradition and Revolution in Latin American Society (3) 

ANTH 370 Korea and Globalization (3) 

GEOG 431 Geography of Africa (3) 

GEOG 443 Geography of East Asia (3) 

GEOG 445 Geography of South and Southeast Asia (3) 

GEOG 447 Geography of the Middle East (3) 

GEOG 461 Geography of Latin America (3) 

SPAN 312 Culture and Civilization of the Spanish-Speaking 

People IP (3) 
SPAN 322 Survey of Spanish Literature 11* (3) 

History and Culture 

PHIL 327 African Philosophy ( 3 ) 

ENGL 336 Post-colonial Literature (3) 

GEOG 357 Cultural Geography (3) 

HIST 121 Latin America: Colonial Period (3) 

HIST 111 Modern East Asia since the 1 7th Century (3) 

HIST 122 Latin America: National Period (3) 

HIST 307 The Andean Republics (3) 

HIST 312 History of Modern India (3) 

HIST 313 History of Modern Southeast Asia (3) 

HIST 316 Revolutionary China (3) 

HIST 318 Modern Korea (3) 

HIST 322 History of Mexico: National Period (3) 

HIST 328 History of East Africa from 1820 to Present (3) 

HIST 329 History of South Africa (3) 

HIST 339 The Making of the .Modern Middle East (3) 

Institutions 

ECON 421 International Economics (3) 

GEOG 359 Economic Geography (3) 

GEOG 427 The Global Economy (3) 

HIST 324 Democratization in Latin America (3) 

POSC 341 African Government and Politics (3) 

POSC 351 The Government and Politics of Latin America (3) 

* Unit toward the track is only granted for these courses when the topic 
of the course is related to Latin America. 

ASIA TRACK (21 upper-division units) 

The Asia Track is designed to offer students an interdisciplinary 
program of study in various dimensions of the Asian world. 
Students may plan a course of study that concentrates on a partic- 
ular aspect of Asian civilization or on a particular sub-region of 
Asia. One might, for example, focus on the art and philosophy of 
various Asian peoples or, instead, concentrate on Chinese, Indian 
or Japanese civilizations, studying both the traditional and modern 
society, its physical setting, its political and economic development, 
etc. Students interested in Asia should also see the Asian Studies 
Track offered under the Interdisciplinary Studies major. However, 
students may not pursue both the Asia Track in International 
Studies and the Asian Studies minor offered under the 
Interdisciplinary Studies Program. 

To complete the Asia Track, students must take a total of 21 
units (seven courses) from the courses in the categories listed below. 
Courses must be taken in at least three different departments. No 
more than two lower-division courses (6 units) may be counted 
toward the Asia Track. Other courses, not listed below, that are rel- 
evant to Asia (such as special topics courses or directed readings) 
may be accepted with the approval of the student's academic advis- 
er. Courses may not be counted in both the Asia Track and the 
International Studies core. 

Students must complete through the 202 level or equivalent in 
Chinese, Japanese or another language that can be tested by the 
Department of Modern Languages if it is appropriate to the stu- 
dent's interests in Asia. Language units through the 202 level do 
not count toward the 21 units needed for the track or the 48 units 
needed for the International Studies major. 



International Studies Program 



Approved Courses for the Asia Track in International Studies 



Anthropology 
ANTH 367 

An History 
ARTH33i 
ARTH Hi 

Geography 
GEOG 44.5 
GEOG 445 
GEOG 447 

History 

HIST i07 
HIST 109 
HIST 3 11 
HIST 312 
HIST 313 
HIST 315 
HIST 316 
HIST 318 
HIST 319 
HIST 320 

Languages 

CHNS301 
CHNS 492 
JPNS301 
JPNS 492 



Peoples of the Middle East (3) 

The Art of China (3) 
The Art of Japan (3) 



Geography of East Asia (3) 

Geography of South and Southeast Asia (3) 

Geography of the Middle East (3) 



Introduction to the History of Islamic Civilization (3) 
Introduction to the Civilization of India (3) 
Traditional India: Its Historical Development (3) 
History of Modern India (3) 
History of Modern Southeast Asia (3) 
Imperial China: The Last Dynasty (3) 
Revolutionary Chma (3) 
Modern Korea (3) 
Japan, 1830 to 1930 (3) 
Japan, 1930 to Present (3) 



Chinese Composition and Conversation I (3) 
Directed Readings in Chinese (3) 
Japanese Composition and Conversation I (3) 
Directed Readings in Japanese (3) 



Philosophy and Religion 

PHIL 205 Women in World Religions (3) 

PHIL 219 Introduction to Asian Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 301 Philosophies of India (3) 

PHIL 302 Philosophies of China and Japan (3) 

PHIL 357 Topics in Comparative Religion (3) 

EUROPE TRACK (21 upper-division units) 

The Europe Track permits students to apply what they have 
learned in the International Studies curriculum to European issues 
and problems. Students may choose courses that focus their studies 
on a specific issue, such as European integration, or they can 
choose courses that permit them to gain a broader perspective on 
European politics, economics and cultures. The entire track must 
be approved by either the student's academic adviser or the direc- 
tor of the International Studies Program. 

To complete the Europe Track, students must take a total of 21 
units (seven courses) from the courses listed in the categories below. 
No more than two lower-division courses (6 units) may be counted 
toward the Europe Track. Other courses, not listed below, that are 
relevant to Europe (such as special topics courses or directed read- 
ings) may be accepted with the approval of the student's academic 
adviser. Courses may not be counted in both the Europe Track and 
the International Studies core. Students may not pursue both the 
Europe Track in International Studies and a European Studies 
minor. 

Students must complete through the 202 level or equivalent in 
any modern foreign language that is offered by or can be tested by 
the Department of Modern Languages. Language units through 
202 do not count toward the 48 units needed for the International 
Studies major. 

Approved Courses in the Europe Track in 
International Studies 

Fine Arts and English 

One o/ the following: 

ARTH 309 Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture (3) 

ARTH 311 Northern Renaissance Art and Architecture (3) 

ENGL 325 18th-Century British Literature (3) 

ENGL 326 Literature of the British Romantic Period (3) 



ENGL 327 The Victorian Age (3) 

ENGL 420 The Development of the British Novel 1 8th Century (3) 

ENGL 421 The Development of the British Novel 19th Century (3) 

ENGL 422 Development of the British Novel 20th Century (3) 

ENGL 423 Modern British Poetry (3) 

MUSC302 Historyof Musicll (3) 

MUSC 402 Music of the Baroque Period (3) 

MUSC 403 Music of the Classical Period (3) 

MUSC 404 Music of the Romantic Period (3) 

MUSC 411 Survey of Opera (3) 

Modern Languages 

One of the following: 

FREN 301 French Composition and Conversation I (3) 

FREN 325 Early French Literature and Civilization (3) 

FREN 326 !8th-Century French Literature and Civilization (3) 

FREN 327 19th-century French Literature and Civilization (3) 

FREN 328 20th-century French Literature and Civilization (3) 

FREN 329 Contemporary French Literature and Civilization (3) 

GERM 301 German Composition and Conversation I (3) 

GERM 31 1 German Culture and Civilization (3) 

GERM 321 Survey of German Literature (3) 

GERM 341 Readings in Contemporary German (3) 

ITAL301 Italian Composition and Conversation I (3) 

ITAL 321 Survey of Italian Literature I (3) 

ITAL 322 Survey of Italian Literature II (3) 

SPAN 301 Spanish Composition and Conversation I (3) 

SPAN 311 Spanish Culture and Civilization 1 (3) 

SPAN 321 Survey of Spanish Literature I (3) 

Social Sciences and Humanities 

One of the following: 

GEOG 451 Geography of Europe (3) 

GEOG 453 Geography of the Former Soviet Union (3) 

HIST 150 Europe and the Non-European World (3) 

HIST 241 History of European Civilization through the 

17th Century (3) 

HIST 242 History of European Civilization from the 17th Century (3) 

HIST 406 Europe: 1815-1914 (3) 

HIST 415 DiplomaticHistoryof Europe: 1815-1939 (3) 

HIST 416 British History: 1760-1902 (3) 

HIST 420 European Ideas: French Revolution to the Present (3) 

HIST 427 European Military History: 1871-1925 (3) 

HIST 429 European Military History: 1925-1945 (3) 

HIST 431 France: 1763-1871 (3) 

HIST 441 Germany: 1871-1945 (3) 

HIST 477 Europe in the Third World: The Age of High Imperialism (3) 

PHIL 322 Hellenistic and Medieval Philosophy (3) 

POSC 337 Comparative Governments of Foreign Powers (3) 

POSC 432 United States - Russian Relations (3) 

POSC 441 Contemporary U.S. - Western European Relations (3) 

LATIN AMERICA TRACK (21 upper-division units) 

The Latin America Track permits International Studies majors to 
apply what they learn about international affairs to the problems 
and cultures in Central America, South America and the 
Caribbean. Students can choose courses to focus their studies on 
specific countries or issues or they can choose courses that provide 
a broad overview of international affairs in the region. The entire 
track must be approved by either the student's academic adviser or 
the director of the International Studies Program. Students inter- 
ested in Latin America should also see the Latin American Studies 
Track offered under the Interdisciplinary Studies major. However, 
students may not pursue both the Latin America Track in 
International Studies and a Latin American Studies minor offered 
under the Interdisciplinary Studies Program. 

To complete the Latin America Track in International Studies, 
students must take a total of 21 units (seven courses) from the 
courses listed in the categories below. No more than two lower- 
division courses (6 units) may be counted toward the Latin 
America Track. Other courses, not listed below, that are relevant to 
Latin America (such as special topics courses or directed readings) 
may be accepted with the approval of the student's academic adviser. 
Courses may not be counted in both the Latin America Track and 
the International Studies core. 



172 



The College of Liberal Arts 



Students must complete through Spanish 202 or equivalent. 
Language units through 202 do not count toward the 48 units 
needed for the International Studies major or the 21 units needed 
to complete the Latin America Track. 

Approved Courses for the Latin America Track in 
International Studies 

Introductory Latin America Courses 

Both of the folUnvmg: 

LAST 100 Latin America: Issues and Approaches* (3) 

(Gen.Ed. I.B) 
HIST 122 Latin America: National Period (3) 

'LAST 100 may be waived by the director of International Studies if the 
student has already completed his or her GenEd I.B requirement at the 
time the student enters the International Studies Program. 

Advanced Latin America Courses 

One of the following: 

ANTH 369 Tradition and Revolution in Latin America (3) 
GEOG 461 Geography of Latin America (3) 
POSC351 Government and Politics of Latin America (3) 

SPAN 312 Culture and Civilization of the Spanish-Speaking 

Peoples II (3) 

Latin America Electives 

Students mint take at least 1 1 units (four courses) selected from the fol- 
lowing list of courses. Courses must be taken in at least three different 
departments. 

ANTH 353 Latinas in the Americas (3) 

ANTH 366 South American Indians (3) 

ANTH 369 Tradition and Revolution in Latin American Society (3) 

ANTH 370 Topics in Anthropology ' (3) 

GEOG 461 Geography of Latin America (3) 

GEOG 495 Directed Readings in Geography ' (3) 

HIST 121 Latin America: Colonial Period (3) 

HIST 122 Latin America: National Period (3) 

HIST 307 The Andean Republics (3) 

HIST 321 History of Mexico: Colonial Period (3) 

HIST 322 History of Me.xico: National Period (3) 

HIST 324 Democratization in Latin America (3) 

pose 351 Government and Politics of Latin America (3) 

POSC 355 Latin American Policy of the United States (3) 

POSC 385 Model Organization of American States (3) 

POSC 470 Special Topics in Political Science * (3) 

POSC 482 Seminar in Political Science '' (3) 

SPAN 301 Spanish Composition and Conversation I (3) 

SPAN 312 Culture and Civilization of Spanish-Speaking People II (3) 

SPAN 439 Literary Movements in Spanish-American Literature (3) 

SPAN 444 20th-century Spanish-American Literature (3) 

SPAN 470 Special Topics in Spanish" (3) 

SPAN 492 Directed Readings in Spanish' (1-3) 

* Special topics, seminar, independent study, and readings courses must be 
related to Latin American topics to count toward the Latin America Track 
in International Studies. 

TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

Transfer students must take a minimum of 18 units of upper-divi- 
sion courses in international studies at Towson to fulfill the require- 
ments for the major. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES MINORS 

In addition to the Bachelor of Arts major, the International Studies 
Program offers two minors for students majoring in other areas. 
The International Studies minor is not open to International Studies 
majors. The European Studies minor is not open to students who 
elect to pursue the Europe Track in the International Studies major. 



INTERNATIONAL STUDIES MINOR (21 units) 

1 . Two of the following: 

ANTH 207 Cultural Anthropology (3) (GenEd. II.D) 

ECON 202 Macroeconomic Principles (3) (GenEd II. C. 2) 

GEOG 105 Geography of International Affairs (3) (GenEd II.DI 

HIST 151 The World since 1945 (3)(GenEd II.D) 

POSC 107 Introduction to International Relations (3) (GenEd II.D) 

2. All students in the International Studies minor must complete 15 units 
(five courses) from the list of approved courses for the General Track of the 
International Studies major. 

3. Language Requirement: Students in the International Studies minor must 
attain an intermediate level of proficiency (through 202) or equivalent in 
any modern foreign language that is offered by or can be tested by the 
Department of Modern Languages. Language units through 202 do not 
count toward the 21 units needed for the minor. 

EUROPEAN STUDIES MINOR (21 units) 

1 . Two of the following: 

HIST 150 Europe and the Non-European World (3) 

HIST 102 History of European Civilization through the 17th 

Century (3) 
HIST 103 History of European Civilization since the 1 7th Century 

(3) 

2. All students in the European Studies minor must complete 15 units (five 
courses) from the list of approved courses for the Europe Track of the 
International Studies major. 

3. Language Requirement: Students in the European Studies minor must 
attain an intermediate level of proficiency (through 202) or equivalent in 
any one of the following modern languages: French, German, Italian, 
Russian or Spanish. 

Students can fulfill the language requirement for the European Studies 
minor through any of the procedures outlined in the Meeting B.A. 
Requirements section of the Department of Modem Languages entry in this 
catalog. Language units through 202 do not count toward the 21 units 
needed for the minor. 

THE INTERNATIONAL CREDENTIAL 

The International Credential provides students in any major with a 
structured curriculum to certify that they have integrated interna- 
tional study and experience with their major. Recognizing the glob- 
al nature of work, study and practice enhances learning in nearly 
all majors. The Credential acknowledges those students who have 
actively and rigorously sought international experience related to 
their course of study. Evidence of the completion of the Credential 
will appear on the student's transcripts. To earn the International 
Credential, students must complete an approved study abroad pro- 
gram, international experiential learning program, or international 
internship program and complete the following courses with a 
grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. 

COMM 378 Intcrcultural Communications (3) 
INST 494 International Studies Abroad (3) 

INST 496 International Research (3) 

Applications for the International Credential are available from the 
director of International Studies in Linthicum Hall, room 1 18L. 



Law and American Civilization Program 



173 



INTERNATIONAL STUDIES ACTIVITIES AND 
PROGRAMS 

The International Studies Program offers students the opportunity 
to participate in the following special programs and activities: 

• internships for academic units in metropolitan Baltimore and 
Washington, D.C. 

• participation in the Model Organization of American States 

• annual foreign affairs conferences held at the U.S. Naval 
Academy, U.S. Air Force Academy, and U.S. Military Academy 
at West Point 

• editing and managing the Towson Journal of International 
Affairs for academic unit 

• travel study and opportunities to more than 15 universities 
around the world 

• the annual Earle T. Hawkins Symposium on International Affairs 



Law and American 
Civilization Program 




Director: Jack Fruchtman 

Affiliated Faculty: Omar Ali (History), Peter Baker (English), Eric 
Belgrad {Political Science), Linda Bishai (Political Science), 
Cynthia Gates (Political Science), Rose Ann Christian 
(Philosophy and Religious Studies), Don-John Dugas (English), 
Edwin Duncan (English), Laura Eldridge (History), Jack 
Fruchtman (Political Science), Cindy Gissendanner (History), 
H. George Hahn (English), Carolyn Hill (English], William 
Home (Electrornc Media and Film), Jack Isaacs (Political 
Science), Martha Kumar (Political Science), Michael Korzi 
(Political Science), Toni Marzotto (Political Scie?ice), John 
Murungi (Philosophy and Religious Studies), Benjamin Neil 
(Accounting), Florence Newman (English), Jo-Ann Pilardi 
(Women's Studies), Akim Reinhardt (History), Stephen Scales 
(Philosophy and Religious Studies), W. Michael Seganish 
(Accounting), Richard Vatz (Mass Communication and 
Communication Studies), Donn Worgs (Political Science) 



OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 



118B, 410-704-3350 



THE PROGRAM 

The Law and American Civilization Program introduces under- 
graduates to the American legal system. Students will learn the 
methodology and gain the knowledge necessary to participate as 
active citizens in a nation devoted to the rule of law and will receive 
intensive training in analytical reasoning and critical thinking. 
Students majoring in Law and American Civilization may wish to 
attend law school following college graduation; they may choose to 
apply to graduate school in one of the disciplines of the program; 
or they may enter the work force in government, business and 
industry, or politics. This course of study is not necessarily a pre- 
professional program. Students not contemplating law or graduate 
school are encouraged to major in the program if their primary aca- 
demic interest in college is to learn more about the American legal 
system. 

MAJOR IN LAW AND AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

Majors must complete 54 units. The program is divided into four 
parts, and writing skills are emphasized throughout. First, students 
must complete two introductory courses, one each in political sci- 
ence and philosophy, which acquaint students with the nature of 
law and its role in American society. Second, students will take four 
core courses, one at the lower-division, two at the upper-division 
level, and an advanced writing course. These courses further situ- 
ate students in American culture, politics, judicial policymaking 
and logical thinking. Third, students will have several options in 
choosing electives, which will be offered by several departments: 
Accounting, Mass Communication and Communication Studies, 
English, History, Philosophy and Religious Studies, and Political 
Science. Fourth and finally, students will undertake a 6-unit cap- 
stone experience of their choice and, if possible, design. Advanced 
students may wish to undertake a project in the workplace and 
then write an analytical essay on that experience as it fits into the 
overall program. Other students will participate in a senior semi- 
nar, in which they will write a research paper on some aspect of the 
law, to be developed into a thesis supervised by the program direc- 
tor. Finally, qualified students may choose to write an honors thesis. 

I. Introductory Courses (6 units) 

PHIL 204 ' Race, Class and Gender (3) 
POSC 209 Introduction to Law (3) 



174 



The College of Liberal Arts 



U.Core Courses (12 units) 

ENGL 3 1 Writing Argument ( 3 ) 
COMM 331 Advocacy and Argument (3) 
PHIL 111 Logic (3)' 

POSC 384 The Judicial System (3) 

in. Electwes (30 units) 

Two courses in each of the following lettered topics. (Students may 
take no more than five law-related courses, so designated by an 
asterisk.) Students will need to fulfill each department's individual 
prerequisites in advance of taking these courses. 



. Accounting 
ACCT201 
LEGL 225^ 
LEGL 226* 



Principles of Accounting I (3) 
Legal Environment of Business (3) 
Business Law (3) 



Communication Studies 

COMM 304 Persuasion (3) 

COMM 420* Communication in the Legal Process (3) 



Mass Communication 

MCOM 350' Media Law 



(3) 



B. English 

Strongly recommended are ENGL 221 and ENGL 222 as prereq- 
uisites. 

ENGL 331 American Drama (3) 

ENGL 361 Literary Research and Applied Criticism (3) 

ENGL 372 Women Writers (3) 

ENGL 425 Chaucer (3) 

ENGL 427 Shakespearean Comedy (3) 

ENGL 428 Shakespearean Tragedy (3) 

ENGL 429 Milton and the Humanist Tradition (3) 

ENGL 431 Literature of the American Romantic Period (3) 

ENGL 432 Literature of the American Realist Period (3) 

ENGL 433 The American Short Story (3) 

ENGL 435 The Development of the American Novel; 19th 

Century (3) 

ENGL 436 The Development of the American Novel: 20th 

Century (3) 

ENGL 441 Modern Fiction to World War II (3) 

ENGL 442 Modern Fiction since World War II (3) 

ENGL 461 History of Literary Criticism (3) 

ENGL 465 British and .American Prose (3) 

ENGL 476 Topics in Multi-ethnic Literature (3) 

ENGL 477 Topics in Black American Literature (3) 

C. History 

HIST 345 The American Colonies (3) 

HIST 346 The American Revolutionary Period (3) 

HIST 347 The Earlv National Period (3) 

HIST 348 The Jacksonian Era (3) 

HIST 349 The Civil War (3) 

HIST 350 The Era of Reconstruction (3) 

HIST 351 The U.S. 1865-1901: Age of Enterprise (3) 

HIST 352 The U.S. 1892-1920: Age of Reform (3) 

HIST 359 The ED.R. Era (3) 

HIST 360 Recent American History (3) 

HIST 361 Gays and Lesbians in U.S. History (3) 

HIST 363 Social History of the U.S. to 1865 (3) 

HIST 364 Social History of the U.S. since 1865 (3) 

HIST 366 A History of American Business (3) 

HIST 367* The Development of the U.S. Constitution: 1787-1941 (3) 

HIST 368* The Bill of Rights and the Constitution, 1941 to the 

Present (3) 

HIST 370 Diplomatic History of the United States (3) 

HIST 374 The Far Western History (3) 

HIST 375 The City in American History (3) 

HIST 378 Immigrants and Immigration in the U.S. (3) 

HIST 379 History of Native Americans: The East (3) 

HIST 380 History of Native Americans: The West (3) 

HIST 381 .African-American History to the .Mid- 19th Century (3) 

HIST 382 African-American History from the Mid- 1 9th Century (3) 

HIST 385 Workers and Work in the United States (3) 



D. Philosophy 

PHIL 311 Symbolic Logic (3) 

PHIL 319 Science, Technology and Values (3) 

PHIL 321* Philosophy of Law'(3) 

PHIL 324 .Modern Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 325 Schools of Contemporary Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 326 American Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 331 Concepts of Woman: An Historical Approach (3) 

PHIL 332 Feminist Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 341 Ethics (3) 

PHIL 353 Philosophy of Religion (3) 

PHIL 361 Ethics of Medicine and the Life Sciences (3) 

PHIL 371 Business Ethics (3) 

E. Political Science 

POSC 305 Urban Government and Politics (3) 

POSC 375 Public Administration (3) 

POSC 381 The Presidency (3) 

POSC 383 Congress (3) 

POSC 417 Political Parties (3) 

POSC 418* Constitutional Law and Politics (3) 

POSC 419* Civil Rights and Civil Liberties: The First and 

Fourteenth Amendments (3) 

POSC 420* Constitutional Protections: Personal Liberty and Rights 

of the Accused (3) 

POSC 421 Politics and Environmental Policy (3) 

POSC 422* The Supreme Court (3) 

POSC 424* Law Online (3) 

POSC 425* Legal Theory (3) 

POSC 427 Political Theory I (3) 

POSC 428 Political Theory II (3) 

POSC 450 Interest Groups and Public Policy (3) 

POSC 467 Politics and the Budgetary Process (3) 

POSC 472 American Political Thought (3) 

POSC 473 International Law (3) 

POSC 478* Courts and Public Policy (3) 

POSC 479* Women and the Law (3) 

IV. Seminar and/or Capstone Experience (6 units) 

Students have five options to fulfill this stage of the Law and 

American Civilization Program. 



Option I 
POSC 482 

POSC 486 
LWAC 491 

Option n 

LWAC 497 
LWAC 491 

Option in 

LWAC 497 
POSC 482 

Option TV 

LWAC 497 
POSC 486 

Option V 
LWAC 498 

LWAC 499 



Seminar in Political Science (3) 

or 

Seminar: Law and Justice (3) 

Thesis Seminar in Law and American Civilization (3) 



Practicum in Law and American Civilization (3) 
Thesis Seminar in Law and American Civilization (3) 



Practicum in Law and American Civilization (3) 
Seminar: Law and Society (3) 



Practicum in Law and American Civilization (3) 
Seminar: Law and Justice (3) 



Honors Thesis 1 : Directed Readings in Law and 
American Civilization (3) 
Honors Thesis II : Thesis in Law and American 
Civilization (3) 



Metropolitan Studies Program 



175 



Metropolitan Studies Program 

Affiliated Faculty: Kent Barnes {Geography and Environmental 
Planning), Cynthia Gates (Political Science), Matthew 
Durington (Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice), 
Kenneth Haddock (Geography and Environmental Planmng), 
Marion Hughes (Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal 
Justice), Toni Marzotto (Political Science), John Morgan II 
(Geography and Environmental Planning), Dennis Munial< 
(Political Science), Seth Ovadia (Sociology, Anthropology and 
Criminal ]ustice), Ronn Pineo (History), Douglas Pryor 
(Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice), Cecilia Rio 
(Women's Studies), Roderick Ryon (History), Timothy Sullivan 
(Economics), Virginia Thompson (Geography and 
Environmental Planning), Donn Worgs (Political Science) 

OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 1188,410-704-5908 
Program Director: Donn Worgs 

THE PROGRAM 

The Metropolitan Studies Program is designed as a liberal arts pro- 
gram that offers students the opportunity to explore the complexity 
of metropolitan regions in the United States as well as overseas. 
Classes place an emphasis on contemporary issues and problems 
and on innovative policy solutions. The Baltimore/Washington 
metropolitan area provides an ideal "laboratory" for classes in 
metropolitan studies. Students are prepared for a number of inter- 
esting careers in the public and private sectors in planning policy 
and community development. The major is also an excellent prepa- 
ration for graduate study in these professional fields, all of which 
are rapidly growing. 

MAJOR IN METROPOLITAN STUDIES 

Students in the Metropolitan Studies major are required to com- 
plete 39 units with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. Of the total 
units in program requirements, a maximum of 9 may also be used 
to fulfill General Education requirements. 

Note: Courses designated with "xx" did not have numbers 
assigned in time for publication. Please see the program director for 
information. 

Core Courses (9 units) 

MTRO 101 Introduction to Metropolitan Studies (3) 

GEOG 1 1 Physical Geography ( 3 ) 

POSC 207 State and Local Government (3) 

Required Courses (27 units) 

Majors must take two courses in each of the categories lettered A, 
B and F; and one course each in C, D and E. 

A. GEOG 391 Urban Systems (3) 
And one of the following: 

GEOG 355 Historical Geography of Urbanization (3) 

GEOG 363 Spatial Organization of Economic Activity (3) 

GEOG 393 Transportation and Infrastructure (3) 

GEOG 409 Comprehensive Planning (3) 

GEOG 484 Land Use Plannmg (3) 

B. POSC 3xx Politics of Metropolitan Growth and Change (3) 
And one of the following: 

POSC 4xx Comparative Metropolitan Governance in Industrial 

Democracies (3) 
POSC 4xx Metropolitan Administration (3) 
POSC 305 Urban Government and Politics (3) 
POSC 4xx Problems and Issues in the Metropolitan State (3) 
POSC 421 Politics and Environmental Policy (3) 



History of Metropolitan Baltimore and Washington (3) 
Metropolitan History in World Perspective (3) 
The City in American Histor)' (3) 



Economics of the Metropolitan Area (3) 
Seminar in Economic Issues (3) 



C. Select One: 
HIST 3xx 
HIST 3xx 
HIST 375 

D. Select One: 
ECON 351 
ECON485 

E. Select One: 

SOCI 339 

SOCI 329 

SOCI 327 

R Select Two: 

1. MTRO 497 Metropolitan Studies Internship (3) 

(open to juniors and seniors with a GPA of 3.00 and above) 

2. MTRO 4xx Honors Seminar: Metropolitan Leadership (3) 

3. any course listed in A-E that coincides with the students individual 
interests in metropolitan studies 

4. an upper-level course that the student's adviser must approve as 
relevant to metropolitan studies (including approved study 
abroad) 

Capstone Experience (3 units) 

MTRO 4xx Capstone Seminar in Metropolitan Studies (3) 



Community Organization (3) 
Demography (3) 
Urban Sociology (3) 




176 



The College of Liberal Arts 



Department of Modern 
Languages 

Professors: John McLucas, Michael O'Pecko, 

Salvatore Zumbo {Chair) 
Associate Professors: Thomas Evans, Beverly Leetch, George 

McCool 
Assistant Professors: Isabel Castro-Vazquez, Francis Guevremont, 

Lea Ramsdell, Katia Sainson 
Lecturer: Enrique Venegas 
Part-time Faculty: Vivian Braun, Kristen Freeman, Franca Gorraz, 

Junko Handa, Teresa Huidobro, Jane Li, James Medvitz, Sylvia 

Moore, Victoria Paetow, James M. Pickett, Celeste Riccio, 

Sophia Swope, Kanji Takeno, Eston Teter, Larissa Titkova, 

Theresa Alfano Vance 

OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 319 F/G, 410-704-2883 
Fax: 410-704-4290 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Modern Languages offers the following pro- 
grams: 1) the major in French, German and Spanish Secondary 
Education; 2) the major in French, German and Spanish 
Literature/Professional Program; 3) the minor in French, German, 
Italian and Spanish; 4) the proficiency in French, German and 
Spanish for non-language majors or minors planning for careers 
which require reasonable oral and written competency in a foreign 
language; and 5) language elective, for all students who wish to 
acquire a reading or conversational ability in one of the following 
languages: Russian, Chinese, Portuguese, Hebrew, Japanese, Greek, 
Latin or Hindi. Expansion of these non-major languages will be 
made in response to expressed student interest. Students majoring 
or minoring in French, German or Spanish must declare their major 
or minor in the department and are required to have academic 
advisers in their major and minor field and maintain close contacts 
with the faculty advisers in order to select and prepare their course 
of study. Majors should see their advisers at least once a term. It is 
recommended that the major be declared before or during the 
sophomore year. 

Culture and Civilization Course Requirement 

The requirement of 6 units of culture and civilization for Spanish 
majors is strongly felt by the Spanish faculty to be a necessity in 
their program. This is primarily because of the great diversity of 
Spanish-speaking countries in Europe, South America, Central 
America and the Caribbean, and the importance of the knowledge 
of this diversity for all who teach or otherwise use Spanish. The 
French faculty also feels that the study of French culture and civi- 
lization represents a necessary aspect of the program and believes 
that it cannot be separated from the study of the language and lit- 
erature. The German culture and civilization course is required for 
the Teacher Education Program in German. 

Double Majors 

The department encourages its language majors in French, German 
or Spanish to carry an additional major in either another language 
or to combine their language with another field of study. Interested 
students should consult the department. 



MAJOR IN FRENCH LITERATURE/PROFESSIONAL 
PROGRAM 

In addition to the General Education (GenEd) requirements, French 
Literature/Professional Program majors must complete 30 units 
with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher in French beyond the 
intermediate level. Of the 30 units, at least 15 units must be taken 
at Towson University. 

Required Courses (15 units) 

FREN 301 Advanced Conversation (3) 

FREN 302 Advanced Composition (3) 

Students are required to take three courses in literature and civilization at 

the 300 level. All students must take either FREN 328 or FREN 329. 

FREN 328 20th-century French Literature and Civilization (3) 

or 
FREN 329 Contemporary French Literature and Civilization (3) 
phis two of the following: 

FREN 325 Early French Literature and Civilization (3) 

FREN 326 18th-Century French Literature and Civilization (3) 

FREN 327 19th-century French Literature and Civilization (3) 

Electives 

Fifteen units in the target language, including 9 units at the 400 

level are required. 

Students wishing to acquire Professional Program rather than 
Literature Study, with the permission of the department, can sub- 
stitute the internship (497) for one 400-level elective course. The 
internship is generally completed in the junior or senior year, and 
students will need to complete 27 units beyond the intermediate 
level and have a GPA of at least 2.50 in the foreign language before 
applying for the internship. 

FRENCH SECONDARY EDUCATION PROGRAM 

French majors may wish to obtain certification to teach French at 
the secondary level. Students in this Secondary Teacher Education 
Program receive certification to teach in Maryland upon gradua- 
tion. In addition to the GenEd requirements and the requirements 
specified by the Department of Secondary Education, students must 
complete 30 units with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher beyond 
the intermediate level from among the following courses. Students 
must contact the Department of Secondary Education about 
admission to the Secondary Education Program. 

Majors who are in the Secondary Teacher Education Program 
are required to take Advanced Grammar and Method of Teaching 
a Foreign Language before student teaching. 

Required Courses (18 units) 

FREN 301 Advanced Conversation (3) 

FREN 302 Advanced Composition (3) 

Students are required to take three courses in literature and civilization 

at the 300 level. All students must take either FREN 328 or FREN 329. 

FREN 391 Advanced Grammar (31 

FREN 328 20th-century Literature and Civilization (3) 

or 
FREN 329 Contemporary French Literature and Civilization (3) 
plus two of the following: 

FREN 325 Early French Literature and Civilization (3) 

FREN 326 18th-Century French literature and Civilization (3) 

FREN 327 19th-century French literature and Civilization (3) 

Electives 

Twelve units of electives, including 6 units at the 400 level. These 
courses must be taken in addition to the Department of Secondary 
F^ducation requirements. 



Department of Modern Languages 



177 



MINOR IN FRENCH 

Required Courses (18 units) 

FREN 201-202 French Intermediate 1, II (3,3) 

FREN 301 Advanced Conversation (3) 

FREN 302 Advanced Composition (3) 

FREN 325 Early French Literature and CiviHzation (3) 

or 
FREN 326 18th-Centiir\' French Literature and Civilization (3) 

or 
FREN 327 19th-Centur>- French Literature and Civilization (3) 

or 
FREN 328 20th-Centun,' French Literature and Civilization (3) 

or 
FREN 329 Contemporarv' French Literature and Civilization (3) 

plus 
FREN XXX One additional FREN elective course (3) 

MAJOR IN GERMAN LITERATURE/PROFESSIONAL 
PROGRAM 

In addition to the GenEd re q u i renHits, German Literature/ 
Professional Program majors must complete 30 units with a grade 
equivalent of 2.00 or higher in German beyond the intermediate 
level. Of the 30 units, at least 15 units must be taken at Towson 
Universit)'. 

Required Courses (18 units) 

GERM 301-302 Composition and Conversation I, II (3,3) 

GERM 311 Culture and Civilization (3) 

GERM 341 Readings in Contemporary German (3) 

GERM 391 Advanced German Grammar (3) 

GERM 392 Advanced German (3) 

Electives 

Twelve units in the target language, including 9 units of literature 
at the 400 level are required. 

Students wishing to acquire Professional Program rather than 
Literature Study, with the permission of the department, can sub- 
stitute the internship (497) for one 400-level elective course. The 
internship is generally completed in the junior or senior year, and 
students will need to complete 27 units beyond the intermediate 
level and have a GPA of at least 2.50 in the foreign language before 
applying for the internship. 

GERMAN SECONDARY EDUCATION PROGRAM 

German majors in the Secondary Teacher Education Program 
receive certification to teach in Maryland upon graduation. In addi- 
tion to the GenEd requirements and the requirements specified by 
the Department of Secondary Education, students must complete 
30 units with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher beyond the 
intermediate level from among the following courses. Stylistics is 
recommended as an elective. 

Required Courses (21 units) 

GERM 301-302 Composition and Conversation I, II (3,3) 

GER.Vl 303 German Translation (3) 

GER.Vl 31 1 Culture and Civilization (3) 

GER.M 341 Readings in Contemporary German (3) 

GER.M 391 Advanced German Grammar (3) 

GERM 392 Advanced German (3) 

Electives 

Nine units in the target language, including 6 units of literature at 
the 400 level are required. These courses must be taken in addition 
to the Department of Secondary Education requirements. Students 
must contact the Department of Secondary Education about admis- 
sion to the Secondary Teacher Education Program. 



MINOR IN GERMAN 

Required Courses (18 units) 

GERM 201-202Intermediate I, II {3,3) 

GERM 301 Composition and Conversation I (3) 

or 
GERM 302 Composition and Conversation II (3) 
GERM 3 1 1 Culture and Civilization (3) 
GERM 391 Advanced German Grammar (3) 

plus 
GERM XXX One additional GERM elective course (3) 

MAJOR IN SPANISH LITERATURE/PROFESSIONAL 
PROGRAM 

In addition to the GenEd tequinsments, Spanish Literature/ 
Professional Program majors must complete 30 units with a grade 
equivalent of 2.00 or higher in Spanish beyond the intermediate 
level. Of the 30 units, at least 15 units must be taken at Towson 
University. 

Required Courses (18 units) 

SP.^N 301-302 Composition and Conversation I, II (3,3) 
SPAN 311-312 Culture and Civilization 1, II (3,3) 
SPAN 321-322 Survey of Spanish Literature I, II (3,3) 

Electives ( 12 units) 

Select from the folloiring: 

SPAN 305 Readings in Spanish (3) 

SPAN 306 Spanish Phonetics (3) 

SPAN 331 Spanish for Business (3) 

SPAN 391 Advanced Spanish Grammar (3) 

SPAN 407 Advanced Spanish Composition (3) 

SPAN 408 Advanced Spanish Conversation (3) 

SPAN 409 Spanish Translation (3) 

SPAN 400-479 Special Topics (3) 

SP.^N 455 Hispanic Popular Culture (3) 

SPAN 4xx Upper-level literature course (3) 

Of the 12 units of electives in the target language, 3 units must be 
in a 400-level literature course or in a 400-ievel special topics 
course. However, before enrolling in a 400-level literature course, 
students must have completed a survev of literature course, either 
321 or 322. 

Students wishing to acquire Professional Program, with the per- 
mission of the department, can substitute the internship (497) for 
one 400-level elective course. The internship is generally completed 
in the junior or senior year, and students will need to complete 27 
units beyond the intermediate level and have a GPA of at least 2.50 
in the foreign language before applying for the internship. 

SPANISH SECONDARY EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Spanish majors in the Secondary Teacher Education Program 
receive certification to teach in Maryland upon graduation. In addi- 
tion to the GenEd requirements and the requirements specified by 
the Department of Secondary Education, students must complete 
30 units with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher beyond the inter- 
mediate level in the following courses. Students must contact the 
Department of Secondary Education about admission to the 
Secondary Teacher Education Program. 

Required Courses (27 units) 

SPAN 301-302 Composition and Conversation 1, 11 (3,3) 
SPAN 311-312 Culture and Civilization I, II (3,3) 
SPAN 321-322 Survey of Spanish Literature I, II (3,3) 
SPAN 391 Advanced Spanish Grammar (3) 

SPAN 407 Advanced Spanish Composition (3) 

or 
SPAN 408 Advanced Spanish Conversation (3) 



178 



The College of Liberal Arts 



Electives (6 units) 

Six units of electives taken in the target language. These courses 
must be taken in addition to the Department of Secondary 
Education requirements. 

MINOR IN SPANISH 

Required Courses (18 units) 

SP.^iN 201-202 Intermediate I, II (3,3) 

SPAN 301 Composition and Conversation I (3) 

or 
SPAN 302 Composition and Conversation II (3) 

SPAN 311 Culture and Civilization I (3) 

or 
SPAN 312 Culture and Civilization II (3) 

Plus two additional SPAN electives (61 

MINOR IN MODERN LANGUAGE 

The minor program in French, German, Spanish and/or Italian pro- 
vides majors in other disciplines with the educational language 
background necessary to enhance their career opportunities. The 
minor requirements include 12 units of 300-400 level courses in addi- 
tion to the intermediate level course I and II to complete 18 units. 
Language minors may transfer up to 6 units toward a minor and 
must earn 6 upper-division units at Towson. The minor should be 
approved by the student's department adviser and cannot be taken 
concurrently with the proficiency in a modern foreign language. 
Minors in all languages need a C or higher in each completed 
course beyond the intermediate level. 

PROFICIENCY IN A MODERN FOREIGN 
LANGUAGE 

The department has designed a program of study that offers the 
non-language major or minor a recognition of Proficiency in 
Modern Languages with a focus in French, German or Spanish 
upon satisfactory completion of prescribed requirements. 

The proficiency may be earned by a degree candidate at Towson 
University as well as any individual whose sole interest in attending 
the university is for the purpose of obtaining the proficiency of the 
language. 

The program is designed for those individuals who are planning 
or practicing careers which require reasonable oral and written 
competence in a modern language. In the job market, national and 
international, a large number of opportunities await persons whose 
knowledge of one or more modern languages has been well estab- 
lished through intensive college/university study. The proficiency is 
quite advantageous for aspiring professionals in the fields of com- 
munications, public service, business and finance, agriculture, 
transportation, health services, education, energy, natural 
resources, journalism, law, foreign services, air traffic, manage- 
ment, import/export purchasing, sales, etc. 

In order to complete the recognition of proficiency, students 
must complete all required courses with a grade equivalent of 2.00 
or higher Students who are prepared to begin at the advanced level 
will need to complete 12 units of study, whereas students who 
begin at the elementary level will have to earn 24 units in the par- 
ticular language. 

PROFICIENCY IN A MODERN LANGUAGE 

French Proficiency Required Courses (24 units) 

FRF.N I01-l(.)2 ' Elements 1, II (3,3) 
FREN 201-202 Intermediate I, II (3,3) 
FREN 301 Advanced Conversation (3) 

FREN 302 Advanced Composition (3) 

FREN 495 Internship in French (3) 

FREN XXX One elective course in FREN (3) 



German Proficiency Required Courses (24 units) 

GERM 101-102 Elements I, II (3,3) 

GERM 201-202 Intermediate I, II {3,3) 

GERM 301 Composition and Conversation I (3) 

or 
GERM 302 Composition and Conversation II (3) 

GERM 311 Culture and Civilization (3) 

GERM 391 Advanced German Grammar (3) 

GERM 495 Internship in German (3) 

Spanish Proficiency Required Courses (24 units) 

SPAN 101-102 Elements I, II (3,3) 

SPAN 201-202 Intermediate I, II (3,3) 

SPAN 301 Composition and Conversation I (3) 

or 
SPAN 302 Composition and Conversation II (3) 

SPAN 311 Culture and Civilization 1(3) 

or 
SPAN 312 Culture and Civilization II (3) 

SP.\N 495 Internship in Spanish (3) 

SPAN XXX One elective course in SPAN (3) 

MEETING B.A. REQUIREMENTS 

Completion of the intermediate level of a foreign language or its 
equivalent is required of all Bachelor of Arts degree candidates. 
This requirement may be met by: a) completing two or more years 
of the language in high school plus intermediate levels I and II in 
college; b) completing the elementary- and intamediate-level 
courses of the language in college; c) successfully completing one 
term of any course beyond the intermediate level; or d) successfully 
completing a Unit for Prior Learning Exam in any language offered 
at the 301-302 level at Towson University administered each 
November by the Department of Modern Languages. 

CREDIT FOR PRIOR LEARNING EXAM 

The examination will be given only in the languages offered by the 
Department of Modern Languages at the 301-302 level. The units 
for 201-202 may not be earned unless the student takes 301 as a 
course. An overall grade of A is required in order to receive 6 units; 
a grade of B entitles the student to 3 units. The student should con- 
tact the department for further information. 

COMPETENCY UNITS IN MODERN FOREIGN 
LANGUAGES 

Degree candidates successfully completing courses numbered 102, 
201, 202 or 301 in any foreign language offered by the Department 
of Modern Languages at Towson University may earn a maximum 
of 6 units for the two preceding courses if the course in which they 
are enrolled is successfully completed with a grade equivalent of 
2.00 or higher in the first attempt. Students may attempt to earn 
competency units by completing a higher level language course only 
once. Students who have earned units via the competency units or 
Credit for Prior Learning exam in a foreign language cannot enroll 
in any other lower-level courses in the same language for which 
they received the units. Students should consult the department for 
detailed information about the competency units in foreign lan- 
guages. 

PLACEMENT IN LANGUAGES 

The department's policy regarding placement of entering students 
with high school language study follows: 

• One year of high school language studv, students may register 
for 101 or 102. 

• Two vears of high school language studv, students mav regis- 
ter for 102. 

• Three years of high school language study, students may regis- 
ter for 102 or 201. 

• Four years of high school language studv, students may regis- 
ter for 201 or 202. 

• Five years of high school language study, students may regis- 
ter for 202 or 301. 



I 



Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies 



179 



TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

All foreign language majors must complete a minimum of 15 
units toward the major at Towson University at the upper (300- 
400) level. 

All foreign language minors must complete a minimum of 
6 units toward the minor at Towson University at the upper level. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

The department participates in the university honors program. 
Students interested in completing a language major with honors 
should consult the department Honors Board representative no 
later than the first term of their junior year. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS 

The department sponsors the Eta Gamma Chapter of the National 
Spanish Honor Society', Sigma Delta Pi, and encourages all Spanish 
students to participate in the activities of the societ)'. The depart- 
ment also sponsors the Kappa Pi chapter of the National French 
Honor Societ)-, Phi Delta Phi. 

The department offers an internship program through the Career 
Center. 

Study abroad in France, Germany, Spain, Mexico or Italy is also 
available. 

Note for foreign language students: Courses at the levels of 101, 
102, 201 and 202 in any foreign language offered by the depart- 
ment are not open to students who have completed a higher level 
in the same language. 




Department of Philosophy and 
Religious Studies 

Professors: Wolfgang Fuchs, Christos Evangeliou, John Murungi 

(C/w;>), Jo-Ann Pilardi 
Associate Professors: Rose Ann Christian, Stephen Scales 
Assistant Professors: Steven Coutinho, Paul Pojman 

OFHCE 

Linthicum Hall 219F, 410-704-2755 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies offers a 
major and minor in Philosophy, and a major and minor in 
Religious Studies. 

Program in Philosophy 

The examination of the nature of philosophy is an essential feature 
of the Philosophy Program. The program pays close attention to 
the history of philosophy, for it is in its history that the nature of 
philosophy is manifested. The program also attends to the diverse 
social and cultural settings out of which philosophy develops, to 
which it speaks, and with which it interacts. Philosophy cultivates 
and nourishes rigorous thinking; the development and the practice 
of analytic and dialectical skills are strongly emphasized. The pro- 
gram encourages students to take as great a diversity of courses as 
possible. It is flexible enough to ensure the incorporation of new 
interpretations and new schools of philosophy. It also enables the 
faculty to be innovativ'e and to develop new courses. 

The program prepares students for advanced work in philoso- 
phy, humanistic studies and various professions. The sound, clear 
and systematic thinking that philosophy emphasizes also makes 
philosophical education relevant to every other discipline. Hence, 
the program is designed to meet not only the needs of the majors 
and minors but also the needs of every other student in the univer- 
sity. Furthermore, it fosters reflection, a prerequisite for leading the 
good life. 

Program in Rehgious Studies 

Religious studies as an academic endeavor takes as its subject mat- 
ter two distinct but related objects of investigation. On the one 
hand, it focuses on the varied religious traditions, both living and 
dead, that figure prominently in any adequate account of the devel- 
opment of human culture. On the other hand, it theorizes about 
the phenomenon of religion itself, abstracting from its concrete 
manifestations and subjecting it to explanation and evaluation. 
Both orientations reveal religion to be complex by nature. Any spe- 
cific religious tradition is impressively multifaceted. Typically, it is 
the outgrowth of an intricate history and the embodiment of a dis- 
tinctive program for communal existence. Its vision of the nature 
of the cosmos and its understanding of the meaning of human life 
may find expression through ritual, myth, doctrine, art or philoso- 
phy. When religion is treated in more general terms, investigation 
may explore its psychological, sociological, anthropological, artis- 
tic, ethical or metaphysical dimensions. These considerations 
make it apparent that religious studies is well conceived as a mul- 
tidisciplinary enterprise whose subject matter is best understood 
through the employment of a variety of approaches. 

MAJOR IN PHILOSOPHY (33 units) 

In exceptional instances, students may, with the permission of the 
chair, make substitutions of courses within the department for 
required courses. Three units may, with the permission of the chair, 
be taken in an allied discipline. 



180 



The College of Liberal Arts 



Section A: Required Course (3 units) 

PHIL 111 Logic (3) 

Section B: Required Courses (9 units) 

PHIL 22 1 Ancient Greek Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 322 Hellenistic and Medieval Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 324 Modern Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 325 Schools of Contemporary Philosophy (3) 

Section C: Required Courses (6 units) 

PHIL 30 1 Philosophies of India (3) 

or 
PHIL 302 Philosophies of China and Japan (3) 

PHIL 326 American Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 327 African Philosophy (3) 

RLST 357 Topics in Comparative Religion (3) 

Section D: Required Courses (6 units) 
PHIL 20! Social and Political Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 319 Science, Technology and Values (3) 

PHIL 332 Feminist Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 341 Ethics (3) 

Section E: Required Courses (3 units) 



Philosophy of Science (3) 
Philosophy of Law (3) 
Theories of Knowledge (3) 
Aesthetics (3) 
Philosophy of Religion (3) 



PHIL 320 
PHIL 321 
PHIL 339 
PHIL 343 
PHIL 353 
PHIL 380-389 Philosophical Topics (3) 

Section F: Electives (6 units) 

PHIL 413 Phenomenology (3) 

PHIL 417 Existentialism (3) 

PHIL 440-449 Philosophical Systems (3) 

PHIL 460-469 Writing Seminar in Philosophical Studies (3) 

PHIL 470-479 Philosophical Problems (3) 

PHIL 495 Research Tutorial in Philosophy (3) 

MINOR IN PHILOSOPHY (24 units) 
Section A: Required Courses (6 units) 

PHIL 111 Logic (3) 

PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy (3) 

Section B: Required Courses (6 units) 

PHIL 221 Ancient Greek Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 322 Hellenistic and Medieval Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 324 Modern Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 325 Schools of Contemporary Philosophy (3) 

Section C: Required Courses (3 units) 

PHIL 301 
PHIL 302 
PHIL 326 
PHIL 327 
RLST 357 



Philosophies of India (3) 
Philosophies of China and Japan (3) 
American Philosophy (3) 
African Philosophy (3) 
Topics in Comparative Religion (3) 



Section D: Required Courses (3 units) 

PHIL 201 Social and Political Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 319 Science, Technology and Values (3) 

PHIL 332 Feminist Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 341 Ethics (3) 

Section E: Required Courses (3 units) 



PHIL 320 
PHIL 321 
PHIL 339 
PHIL 343 
PHIL 353 
PHIL 380-389 



Philosophy of Science (3) 
Philosophy of Law (3) 
Theories of Knowledge (3) 
Aesthetics (3) 
Philosophy of Religion (3) 
Philosophical Topics (3) 



Section F: Required Courses (3 units) 

PHIL 413 Phenomenology (3) 

PHIL 417 Existentialism (3) 

PHIL 45 1 Philosophy of Religion (3) 

PHIL 440-449 Philosophical Systems (3) 

PHIL 460-469 Writing Seminar in Philosophical Studies (3) 

PHIL 470-479 Philosophical Problems (3) 

PHIL 495 Research Tutorial in Philosophy (3) 

MAJOR IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (36 units) 

Majors in Religious Studies must complete 36 units of course work, 
15 from a set of core requirements designed to equip students with 
methodological tools critical to the study of religion and to 
acquaint them with a broad spectrum of religious traditions. The 
remaining 21 units are to be selected from elective courses organ- 
ized along geographical and cultural lines into four areas of study 
and representing various academic disciplines. Elective courses are 
to be distributed over at least three of the four areas and are to be 
selected from at least two disciplines; 15 of the 21 units are to be 
at the 300-400 level. In selecting electives, students are strongly 
encouraged to meet with the program coordinator in order to be 
guided to courses that will address their distinctive interests and 
contribute to a balanced course of study. 

Core Courses (IS units) 

RLST 105 Introduction to the Study of Religion (3) 

or 
RLST 205 Women in World Religions (3) 

RLST 206 Judaism, Christianity and Islam (3) 

PHIL 219 Introduction to Asian Philosophy (3) 

ANTH 207 Cultural Anthropology (3) 

or 
ANTH 210 Honors Cultural Anthropology (3) 
PHIL 353 Philosophy of Religion (3) 

or 
RLST 357 Topics in Comparative Religion (3) 

Electives 

Students complete 21 units to be distributed over at least three of 
the following four areas and representing at least two academic dis- 
ciplines, 15 of which must be at the 300 or 400 level. Additional 
elective courses may be approved each term by the department. 



AREAl 

ANTH 331 
ANTH 364 
ANTH 365 
ANTH 366 
ANTH 369 
HIST 135 
HIST 328 
HIST 379 
HIST 380 
PHIL 327 

AREA 2 

ARTH331 
ARTH 333 
HIST 109 
HIST 111 
HIST 312 
PHIL 301 
PHIL 302 

AREA 3 

ENGL 341 
HIST 107 
HIST 275 
HIST 301 
RLST 355 



Eskimo Ethnography (3) 

Religion, Magic and Witchcraft (3) 

North American Indians (3) 

South American Indians (3) 

Tradition and Revolution in Latin America (3) 

African History and Culture (3) 

History of East Africa from 1820 to the Present (3) 

History of Native Americans: The East (3) 

History of Native Americans: The West (3) 

African Philosophy (3) 



The Art of China (3) 

The Art of Japan (3) 

Introduction to the Civilization of India (3) 

Traditional India (3) 

History of Modern India (3) 

Philosophies of India (3) 

Philosophies of China and Japan (3) 



History and Literature of the Old Testament (3) 
Introduction to History of Islamic Civilization (3) 
The History of Ancient Israel (3) 
Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations (3) 
Introduction to the New Testament (3) 



Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies 



181 



AREA 4 

ARTH 221 Survey of Western Art (3) 

ARTH 307 Medieval Art (3) 

F.NGL 243 Introduction to Classicil Mythology (3) 

ENGL 429 Milton (3) 

HIST 101 Introduction to Ancient Civilization (3) 

HIST 105 Byzantine Empire and Balkans to 1821 (3) 

HIST 277 A Survey of Jewish History (3) 

HIST 303 Hellenistic Civilization (3) 

HIST 304 Ancient Greek Civilization (3) 

HIST 305 Roman Civilization (3) 

HIST 401 The Early Middle Ages: 300-1050 (3) 

HIST 402 The High Middle Ages: 1050-1350 (3) 

HIST 404 The Reformation: 1500-1648 (3) 

PHIL 22 1 Ancient Greek Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 322 Hellenistic and Medieval Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 326 American Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 417 Existentialism (3) 

MINOR IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (24 units) 
Core Courses (12 units) 

REST 105 Introduction to the Study of Religion (3) 

or 
REST 205 Women in World Religions (3) 

REST 206 Judaism, Christianity and Islam (3) 

PHIL 219 Introduction to Asian Philosophy (3) 

PHIL 353 Philosophy of Religion (3) 

or 
REST 357 Topics in Comparative Religion (3) 

Electives 

Students complete 12 units to be distributed over at least two of the 
following areas. Additional elective courses appropriate to specif- 
ic areas may be approved each term by the program coordinator. 



TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

All Philosophy and Religious Studies majors must complete a min- 
imum of 24 units toward the major at Towson University, with at 
least 18 units at the upper (300-400) level. 

All Philosophy and Religious Studies minors must complete a 
minimum of 18 units toward the minor at Towson Universit)', with 
at least 12 units at the upper level. 



AREA 1 

ANTH 331 
ANTH 364 
ANTH 365 
ANTH 366 
ANTH 388 
HIST 328 
HIST 379 
HIST 380 
PHIL 327 

AREA 2 

ARTH 331 
ARTH 333 
HIST 312 
PHIL 301 
PHIL 302 

AREA 3 

ENGL 341 
HIST 301 
REST 355 

AREA 4 

ARTH 307 
ENGL 429 
HIST 303 
HIST 304 
HIST 305 
HIST 401 
HIST 402 
HIST 404 
PHIL 322 
PHIL 326 
PHIL 417 



Eskimo Ethnography (3) 

Religion, Magic and Witchcraft (3) 

North American Indians (3) 

South American Indians (3) 

Peasant Cultures (3) 

History of East Africa from 1820 to the Present (3) 

History of Native Americans: The East (3) 

History of Native Americans: The West (3) 

African Philosophy (3) 



The Art of China (3) 
The Art of Japan (3) 
History of Modern India (3) 
Philosophies of India (3) 
Philosophies of China and Japan (3) 



History and Literature of the Old Testament (3) 
Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations (3) 
Introduction to the New Testament (3) 



Medieval Art (3) 

.Milton (3) 

Hellenistic Civilization (3) 

.Ancient Greek Civilization (3) 

Roman Civilization (3) 

The Earlv Middle Ages: 300-1050 (3) 

The High .Middle Ages: 1050-1350 (3) 

The Reformation: 1500-1648 (3) 

Hellenistic and Medieval Philosophy (3) 

American Philosophy (3) 

Existentialism (3) 




182 



The College of Liberal Arts 



Department of Political Science 

Professors: Eric Belgrad, Jack Fruchtman, Martha Kumar, Toni 
Marzotto, James Roberts [Chciir), Joseph Rudolph 

Associate Professors: Cynthia Gates, Dennis Muniak 

Assistant Professors: Linda Bishai, Michael Korzi, Alison 
McCartney, Donn Worgs 

Lecturer: James L. Hardin 

Part-time Faculty: Andreas Behnke, John Bowen, James Brochin, 
Robert Ginsburg, Hidetashi Hashimoto, Jack Isaacs, Lynn 
Kirby, Bosire Maragia, G. Franklin Mullen, Nitza Nachmias, 
Dennis Rasmussen, Sabrina Willis, Ted Zaleski 

OFFICE 

Linthicum Hall 1 18M, 410-704-2958, Fax: 410-704-2960 

PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The program of courses in political science aims to promote under- 
standing of the nature of political relationships. The department 
offers a major and minor in Political Science. In addition, the 
Department of Political Science offers a double major with the 
Department of Economics, the Department of Mass 
Communication and Communication Studies, and with the 
Department of Geography and Environmental Planning. Students 
wishing to major in both Political Science and Economics, or 
Political Science and Geography and Environmental Planning, or 
Political Science and Mass Communication, or Political Science and 
Communication Studies can obtain a double major which certifies 
that the requirements of both departments have been completed. 
Students should refer to the section on double majors listed on the 
next page. The major prepares students for advanced study and 
provides the foundation for careers in public administration, law, 
public relations, business and research, and urban and regional 
planning. 

MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Thirty-six units with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher are 
required for the major in Political Science. Students must complete 
the following requirements: 

• At least 9 units at the lower-division, of which no more than 3 
units may be at the 200 level 

• POSC 301 Political Research I 

• At least 21 units at the upper-division, including courses in three 
of the four topical areas: Comparative Politics, International 
Politics, American Government and Public Administration, and 
Law and Political Theory 

Note: Courses taught under Independent Study (POSC 490) or 
under Special Topics (POSC 470-479) will be assigned to one of the 
four areas by the department or students' advisers. This is to assure 
that courses taken under these two categories are not used in more 
than one area in order to meet the three area requirements. 

Three units from among the approved seminar courses. (Note: 
Seminar unit will not be given for Independent Study POSC 490.) 
All courses must be completed with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or 
higher except POSC 465. "Pass" will count only for POSC 465. 

Required Courses (36 units) 

POSC 301 Political Research I (3) 
At least three of the folUnving, of which no more than one may be at the 
200 level: 

POSC 101 Introduction to Political Science (3) 

POSC 102 Honors Introduction to Political Science (3) 

POSC 103 American National (Jovcrnment (3) 

POSC 105 Governments of the World (3) 

POSC 107 Introduction to International Relations (3) 

POSC 108 Honors International Relations (3) 

POSC 207 State Government (3) 

POSC 209 Introduction to Law (3) 

POSC 212 Honors in Political Science (3) 



Approved Seminar Courses 

All majors must take an approved seminar from the following list. 
POSC 301 Political Research I must be completed before register- 
ing for a seminar. 

POSC 455 Seminar: International Law and Organization I (3) 

POSC 456 Seminar: International Law and Organization II (3) 

POSC 457 Seminar: Use of Force in International Law (3) 

POSC 481 Seminar: Public Policy Analysis (3) 

POSC 482 Seminar in Political Science (3) 

POSC 483 Seminar: Politics and the News Media (3) 

POSC 485 Seminar: Democratic Theory Seminar (3) 

POSC 486 Seminar: Justice and the Law (3) 

POSC 488 Seminar: Topics in Public Policy (3) 

POSC 491 Seminar in Contemporary United States Foreign Policy (3) 

Electives 

Twenty-one units of electives, not counting the required seminar, 
must be taken at the upper division in three of the four topical areas 
of political science. No more than 9 units of special topics courses 
(470-479) may be united toward the major. 

Topical Areas 

The department offers courses in four topical areas: Comparative 
Politics, International Politics, American Government and Public 
Administration, and Law and Political Theory. The numbers indi- 
cate courses that are offered in each area. 

Comparative Politics: 337, 339, 340, 351, 470, 471, 490, 498, 499 
International Politics: 303, 307, 355, 385, 432, 437, 441, 465, 
472, 473, 474, 490, 491, 498, 499 

American Government and Public Administration: 305, 375, 381, 
383, 384, 401, 417, 421, 450, 467, 475, 476, 477, 490, 493, 498, 
499 

Law and Political Theory: 418, 419, 422, 424, 427, 428, 478, 479, 
490, 498, 499 

MINOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Twenty-one units with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher are 
required for the minor in Political Science to be completed as fol- 
lows: at least 6 units at the lower division of which no more than 
3 units may be at the 200 level; at least 15 units at the upper 
division. 

Required Courses (21 units) 

At least two of the following, of which no more than one may be at the 

200 level: 

POSC 101 Introduction to Political Science (3) 

POSC 102 Honors Introduction to Political Science (3) 

POSC 103 American National Government (3) 

POSC 105 Governments of the World (3) 

POSC 107 Introduction to International Relations (3) 

POSC 108 Honors Introduction to International Relations (3) 

POSC 207 State Government (3) 

POSC 209 Introduction to Law (3) 

POSC 212 Honors in Political Science (3) 

Electives (15 units) 

Select 15 upper-division elective units in political science. 

DOUBLE MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 
AND ECONOMICS 

Completion of individual majors in Political Science and 
Economics requires the successful completion of 69 units (36 in 
political science and 33 in economics). However, by electing the 
double major in Political Science and Economics, students will be 
able to complete both majors with a total of 57 units. Students 
interested in either of the double majors should consult with an 
adviser in cither department to review requirements. 



Department of Political Science 



183 



In political science, students must complete all requirements for 
the major. However, they must substitute two of the following 
upper-level courses (6 units) in economics toward fulfillment of the 
required seven upper-level courses (21 units) in political science: 

ECON 323 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

ECON 325 Economic Development (3) 

ECON 331 Government and Economic Life (3) 

ECON 337 Public Finance (3) 

ECON 339 Health Economics (3) 

ECON 351 Urban Economics (3) 

ECON 375 Environmental Economics (3) 

ECON 421 International Economics (3) 

ECON 423 International Monetary Theory and Policy (3) 

ECON 470-479 Topics in Economics' (3) 

'Topic to be approved by the Department of Political Science 

In economics, students must complete all requirements for the 
major. However, they must substitute two of the following upper- 
level courses (6 units) in political science toward fulfillment of the 
required four courses (12 units) of upper-division economics elec- 
tives: 

POSC 305 Urban Government and Politics (3) 

POSC 375 Public Administration (3) 

POSC 421 Politics and Environmental Policy (3) 

POSC 459 Simulation and Games in Political Science (3) 

POSC 470-479 Special Topics* (3) 

POSC 481 Public Policy Analysis (seminar or lecture course) (3) 

'Topic to be approved by the Department of Economics 

DOUBLE MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE AND 
GEOGRAPHY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING 

Completion of individual majors in Political Science and 
Geography requires the successful completion of 75 units (36 in 
political science, 39 in geography). However, by electing the double 
major in Political Science and Geography, students will be able to 
complete both majors with a total of 65 units. Students interested 
in this double major should consult with an adviser in either 
department to review requirements. 

In political science, students must complete all requirements for 
the major. However, they must substitute two of the following 
upper-level courses (6 units) in geography and environmental plan- 
ning toward fulfillment of the required seven upper-level courses 
(21 units) in political science: 

GEOG 317 Energy Resources (3) 

GEOG 355 Historic Geography of Urbanization (3) 

GEOG 359 Economic Geography (3) 

GEOG 381 Political Geography (3) 

GEOG 385 Population Geography (3) 

GEOG 391 Urban Systems (3) 

GEOG 393 Transportation and Infrastructure Planning (3) 

GEOG 405 Comprehensive Planning (3) 

GEOG 427 Global Economy (3) 

GEOG 431 Geography of Africa (3) 

GEOG 461 Geography of Latin America (3) 

GEOG 470-79 Seminar in Geography' (3) 

' Topic to be approved by the Department of Political Science 

In geography and environmental planning, students must com- 
plete all requirements for the major. However, they must substitute 
two of the following upper-level courses (6 units) in political sci- 
ence toward fulfillment of the required five courses (15 units) of 
lower/upper-division geography and environmental planning elec- 
tives: 

POSC 303 Theory of International Politics (3) 

POSC 305 Urban Government and Politics (3) 

POSC 307 Contemporary International Polidcs (3) 

POSC 337 Comparative Government of Foreign Powers: The 

Western World (3) 
POSC 340 Comparative Public Policy (3) 



POSC 351 The Government and Politics of Latin America (3) 

POSC 355 TheLatin American Policy of the U.S. (3) 

POSC 385 Model Organization of American States (3) 

POSC 441 Contemporar)' U.S.-European Relations (3) 

POSC 470-79 Special Topics in Political Science' (3) 

POSC 488 Seminar: Topics in Public Policy (3) 

' Topics to be approved by the Department of Geography and 
Environmental Planning 

DOUBLE MAJOR PROGRAMS WITH MASS 
COMMUNICATION AND COMMUNICATION STUDIES 

Completion of individual majors in Political Science and 
Communication Studies or Political Science and Mass 
Communication requires the successful completion of 72 units {36 
in each major). However, by electing the double major in Political 
Science and Communication Studies or Political Science and Mass 
Communication, students will be able to complete both majors 
with a total of 60 units. Students interested in either of the double 
majors should consult with an adviser in either department to 
review requirements. 

DOUBLE MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE AND 
COMMUNICATION STUDIES 

In political science, students must complete all requirements for the 
major. However, they must substitute two of the following upper- 
level courses (6 units) in communication studies toward fulfillment 
of the required seven upper-level courses (21 units) in political sci- 
ence: 

COMM 304 Persuasion (3) 

COMM 331 Argument and Advocacy (3) 

COMM 379 Intercultural Communication (3) 

COMM 420 Communication in the Legal Process (3) 

COMM 470 Special Topics' (3) 

'Topic to be approved by the Department of Political Science 

In communication studies, students must complete all require- 
ments for the major. However, they must substitute two of the fol- 
lowing upper-level courses (6 units) in political science toward ful- 
fillment of the required three courses (9 units) of communication 
studies electives: 

POSC 301 Political Research I (3) 

POSC 340 Comparative Public Policy (3) 

POSC 375 Public Administration (3) 

POSC 381 Presidencv (3) 

POSC 383 Congress (3) 

POSC 417 Political Parties (3) 

POSC 459 Simulation and Games (3) 

POSC 470-479 Special Topics' (3) 

'Topic to be approved by the Department of Mass Communication and 
Communication Studies 

DOUBLE MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE AND 
MASS COMMUNICATION 

In political science, students must complete all requirements for the 
major. However, they must substitute two of the following upper- 
level courses (6 units) in mass communication toward fulfillment of 
the required seven upper-level courses (21 units) in political science: 

MCOM 350 Media Law (3) 

MCOM 352 Media Criticism (3) 

MCOM 385 Mass Media and Society (3) 

MCOM 431 Public Opinion and the Press (3) 

MCOM 433 Media Ethics (3) 

MCOM 479 Special Topics' (3) 

'Topic to be approved by the Department of Political Science 



184 



The College of Liberal Arts 



In mass communication, students must complete all require- 
ments for the major. However, they must substitute two of the fol- 
lowing upper-level courses (6 units) in political science toward ful- 
fillment of the required seven courses (21 units) of electives in mass 
communication: 

POSC 301 Political Research 1(3) 

POSC 340 Comparative Public Policy (3) 

POSC 375 Public Administration (3) 

POSC 381 Presidency (3) 

POSC 383 Congress (3) 

POSC 417 Political Parties (3) 

POSC 459 Simulation and Games (3) 

POSC 470-479 Special Topics' (3) 

*Topic to be approved by the Department of Mass Communication and 
Communication Studies 

TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY 

Students who transfer to Towson University in senior standing are 
expected to complete a minimum of 15 units of upper-division 
political science courses. Those who transfer below senior standing 
normally will be expected to complete 21 units of upper-division 
political science courses at Towson University. 

CAREERS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political Science majors generally prepare themselves, at the under- 
graduate level, for careers in law, government (federal, state and 
local), service in public and private interest groups, business, and 
journalism and the media, as well as research and teaching at vari- 
ous levels of the education system. 

STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES 
Activities 

In addition to its academic curriculum, the department offers 
opportunities providing a broad range of related experiences. 
Classes travel to Annapolis and Washington, D.C. to observe first- 
hand the political workings of government. The annual Earle T. 
Hawkins Symposium on International Affairs brings to campus 
noted scholars to lecture on topics of contemporary relevan